Stephen Curry

Stephen Curry heads list of NBA All-Star Game snubs

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Stephen Curry, sorry. It sucks.

Every year there are a couple of guys right on the bubble, guys you can argue should have made the NBA All-Star Game as reserves voted in by the coaches, but didn’t make the cut. (If you have a problem with the starters, blame yourself — the fans vote those in.)

It’s tough on the coaches, they have seven spots to fill and probably 10 guys that are deserving. Tom Thibodeau complained about it Wednesday night (and he is one of the coaches you know actually fills out his own ballot, doesn’t hand it off to an assistant).

But still, people get screwed. Who got it this year? How about three from each conference:

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors. He is the initiator, the guy driving the Golden State offense, he’s scoring 20.9 points a game, dishing out 6.6 assists per game and is shooting 45.1 percent from three while taking nearly seven shots from there a game (he is the best pure shooter in the league). He’s grown his game as defenses have adjusted to him, he can put the rock on the floor and create space. What’s more, he’s made himself a good pick-and-roll defender. He’s led his team to a surprisingly good record and they are a playoff lock. I don’t think you can ask more of a guy.

Jamal Crawford, Los Angeles Clippers. This is one a lot of fans wanted — the All-Star Game is an exhibition and J-Crossover is flashy and fun to watch. He’s also scoring 16.6 points a game, second best on one of the top teams in the NBA, and he’s the leader of the best bench group in the Association. It would be tough to take him over James Harden, Tony Parker or even Curry but he is playing the best ball of his career and winning and that should be rewarded.

Serge Ibaka, Oklahoma City Thunder. Ibaka made my list of guys I would have voted on the reserve team. He has developed a dangerous midrange game and is giving the Thunder 14 points a game on 56 percent shooting plus pulling down 8.3 points a game. And that’s not mentioning he’s really best on the defensive end of the floor where he is one of the game’s best help defenders. Ibaka has become a big part of what the Thunder do and some recognition would have been nice, I had him in just ahead of Zach Randolph, but the coaches saw it differently.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Paul Pierce, Boston Celtics. The fans voted in Kevin Garnett and Rajon Rondo as starters but the Celtics leading scorer at 18.9 points per game didn’t make it even as a reserve. More than just the leading scorer, he has kept the Celtics offense going this season and they would be lost without him. Or more lost. Granted, at 35 he’s not quite as spry as he once was but the guy create his own shot in the half court, he’s shooting 36.4 percent from three, he can get to the line, he’s efficient and he’s got a PER of 19. He’s still got it and in my book and he is still an All-Star.

Brook Lopez, Brooklyn Nets. He has been the best offensive center in the East all season and a catalyst for the Nets transformation this season — when he plays they are a dangerous team. He’s averaging 18.6 points per game shooting 52.1 percent. And he’s grabbing 7.4 rebounds a game, although we can all admit that is not his forte. His defense has improved. He’s got a ridiculous PER of 25.4 — the kind of number that usually means lock All-Star.

Brandon Jennings, Milwaukee Bucks. Jennings himself knew he likely wasn’t going to make the cut and it’s because it’s a numbers game — Rajon Rondo and Dwyane Wade were voted in by the fans as starters and it’s hard argue against the amazingly talented Kyrie Irving or Jrue Holiday, who has carried the Sixers in the absence of Andrew Bynum. But if you want to make the case that a guy leading his team to wins should get preference then Jennings deserves a spot as the Bucks are 22-18 and he is averaging 18.7 points and 5.8 assists per game, with a PER of 17.5.

Zach LaVine edges Aaron Gordon in epic, insane Dunk Contest

Minnesota Timberwolves Zach LaVine slam dunks the ball during the NBA all-star skills competition in Toronto on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. (Mark Blinch/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
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TORONTO — That. Was. Amazing.

In a dunk contest that will go down with the all-time greats — Jordan vs. Dominique, Dr. J from the free throw line — Minnesota’s Zach LaVine defended his dunk contest title. Barely. Because Orlando’s Aaron Gordon was doing dunks nobody had ever seen before.

And LaVine was bringing it just as hard.

The two men advanced to the finals — dismissing Will Barton and Andre Drummond, each of whom had good dunks — and that was when it got wild.

There were four second-round dunks, and four perfect scores of 50. (That was in spite of Shaq, who wanted to give nines for second attempts.)

The Air Canada Centre crowd was exploding with every dunk. The two men went to a dunk-off — and got two more 50s.

So they went to a second-round of overtime, where LaVine put up another 50 and won the contest.

Gordon was close to perfect. Zach LaVine can flat-out fly.

Magic’s Aaron Gordon with the over-the-mascot mad dunk

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TORONTO — Aaron Gordon was giving Zach LaVine all he could handle in the Dunk Contest.

He blew the lid off the Air Canada Centre with this dunk in the first round — and it wasn’t even his best dunk of the night. Never seen this before.

This dunk contest was awesome, so much more video to come.

Zach LaVine opens Slam Dunk Contest title defense with spectacular behind-the-back slam (VIDEO)

during the BBVA Compass Rising Stars Challenge 2016 at Air Canada Centre on February 12, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.
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TORONTO — Zach LaVine clearly heard all the talk that Aaron Gordon or Will Barton had a chance to upset him in the Slam Dunk Contest. He came out ready to prove his superiority right off the bat. This behind-the-back slam was his first attempt of the night:

Even better was the reaction, both from Andre Drummond and from LaVine’s Minnesota teammates:

Splash Brothers showtime: Klay Thompson beats Stephen Curry to win Three-Point Contest

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TORONTO — It came down to the Splash Brothers. Because of course it did. Just like last season.

In the final round of the NBA All-Star Saturday Three-Point Shootout, defending champ Stephen Curry hit his first eight shots and set the bar high with 23 points — the best score of the night.

His backcourt teammate Klay Thompson responded by draining his last seven shots, which included the entire money rack, and put up 27 points — tying the event record.

That gave Thompson the upset win and the Three-Point Contest title.

Although, is it an upset if the second best shooter in the game beats the best?

“It was like déjà vu last year,” Thompson said. “Not gonna lie, I got nervous when he hit his first eight, and I didn’t think he was going to miss. But it was exciting, just coming back to Oakland [with the title], you know. Back-to-back years for Splash Brothers, it’s pretty cool.”

So does Thompson have bragging rights?

“(For) about 364 days, and then — but that’s a daily thing we do,” Thompson said. “We love to shoot against each other. You know, I’ve never been on a team with someone who shoots it better than me, so it’s a privilege to work with him every day. He makes me that much better.”

The Final round was two you expected — the Splash Brothers — plus one few did, Suns rookie Devin Booker.

Getting there was not simple. In the first round, Thompson set a high bar going first and putting up 22. Curry got hot in the middle, then hit the last two money balls to reach 21. James Harden and J.J. Redick ( who stayed behind the line this year) scored very solid 20s. Later 19-year-old rookie Booker put up a 20 to tie those two veterans. Milwaukee’s Khris Middleton (13 points) Portland’s C.J. McCollum (14) and home-town crowd favorite Raptor Kyle Lowry (15) got bounced. .

That left Harden, Redick, and McCollum in a tiebreaker, and the rookie calmly put up a 12 in 30 seconds to advance.

Booker took a step back in the final round with a 16.

Not that it mattered with the Splash Brothers in the building.