Gary Payton talks Lillard, D-Will and guarding Jordan

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We look at today’s NBA as almost a new golden age of point guards — Chris Paul, Rajon Rondo, Tony Parker, Derrick Rose, Russell Westbrook, and the list goes on and on.

It’s a very different era from when Gary Payton was at the peak of his career. Back then Payton could body up on Michael Jordan or Tim Hardaway to defend them — he could hand check, hook them a little, be physical with them on the perimeter. Today, any little contact on the perimeter is whistled as a foul.

It’s a different world, one Payton is not sure he could be the same player in. Of course, the reverse is true of today’s best point guards in his era, the legendary Sonic said.

“It would be very hard for me to adjust because I was very aggressive,” Payton told ProBasketballTalk. “I was an aggressive basketball player. I probably wouldn’t be on the floor too often because I would have to be aggressive. Today you would have to adjust by being a finesse basketball player and just scoring. I don’t know….

“A lot of these players are very explosive and I couldn’t have been pressing up on them. But in our day these guys would have had a lot of problems because we can hand check, we can hold you, we could do a lot of things and you couldn’t go nowhere. We would have been doubling up and jumping out and a lot of players would have been getting hit. It just would have been a little bit different.”

Payton now spends time at his California home, working on his charitable foundations that help youth in Oakland where he grew up. He’s working with Nike to re-release “The Glove” signature shoes, but updated (kind of like Nike did with Penny Hardaway’s shoes recently). And Payton’s working to launch Thuzio in Los Angeles, a company that sets people or organizations up with athletes to come speak at an event or just go to a dinner party.

Payton also is watching a lot of basketball. And what point guards is he watching?

“I like Damian Lillard because he’s from Oakland, California, and he’s a phenomenal basketball player,” Payton said. “He should be the rookie of the year, he’s playing very well right now for Portland and I love his game.

“I’ve been watching Deron Williams for a long period of time now and I like him. He is the epitome of an old-school basketball player. He just goes out there and gets it done, he’s not about being fancy, going through your legs three or four times, pulling up in your face. He just gets it done. He just gets what he has to get, gets his assists, gets his rebounds, gets his points and just gets his team to win.”

Payton talked about a number of other topics with PBT as well (which you can hear more of in his own words in our Friday prodcast):

• On being nominated for the Hall of Fame: “It’s showing a lot of people have respected the things I’ve done in basketball and it’s showing I’ve done a lot in basketball. And I’m really happy for it. Not a lot of people can get in the Hall of Fame, it’s a great honor. I hope that I can make it.”

• On the NBA possibly returning to Seattle soon: “I don’t like to talk about it until it is done. Hopefully it will be there, hopefully it will come back. The Seattle people deserve it very much, they’ve been going on without basketball for seven years now and hopefully that can be done. It would be a great deal for the city of Seattle.”

• On defending Michael Jordan: “What you’ve got to understand is Michael Jordan couldn’t be stopped he could just be contained because he was a great offensive player. He could get to the free throw line. He could jump over you. He had great moves, he did a lot of things.”

“What I tried to do was tie him up, to get a little frustrated, and hopefully I could do that and it worked sometimes. But he would still get his 25-30 points because a guy like that, when he shoots the ball as many times as Michael Jordan does you can’t stop him. He’s going to make baskets and get to the free throw line. So I just tried to contain him. Just tie him up, don’t let him get the ball easy, don’t let him get in his comfort zone, make things difficult for him and try to get him frustrated where he’ll foul you and get in a little foul trouble, then something good will happen for me.”

• Payton is working with John Wall and helping the Wizards guard adjust to the NBA.

• On his charity work: “I work with kids now, try to get them out of the neighborhood, try to get them scholarships, because their families and their parents can’t give them enough money to get out. I give five scholars scholarships a year. In Oakland I have a youth center.”

• On the recent trash talk incident between Carmelo Anthony and Kevin Garnett, and report KG said something about ‘Melo’s wife: “That’s just disrespectful. It’s just the same thing where you can’t say something about somebody’s mom, or their father that was just sick and died or something. There’s just a fine line that you go to.

“You can talk the stuff but this this is nothing but a game. When it gets personal and people get their feelings involved then these guys can do anything. They start wanting to see you off the court and things like that. So we got to keep it a little bit under control.”

• And he was clearly excited about Thuzio and getting to mean fans through it: “It’s a good thing with Thuzio because it gives fans a lot of the memorable things with athletes that they really, really wanted to meet for a long time. There’s people who are like ‘Wow, I wish I could meet Gary Payton.’ Now Thuzio is giving you the opportunity to do that. You can come and have me as a coach, you can have me as a dinner partner, that is something that can be memorable for someone for the rest of their life.”

Utah’s Donovan Mitchell wins throwback Dunk Contest with Vince Carter tribute

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LOS ANGELES — The 2018 Dunk Contest went retro.

And it worked.

The throwbacks started with Cleveland’s Larry Nance Jr. going quick-change to pay tribute to his father, the 1984 winner of the Dunk Contest.

Nance later had the best dunk of the night, but it wasn’t enough in the face of Utah’s Donovan Mitchell‘s strong and consistent night highlight by his throwback dunk — donning a Vince Carter Toronto dinosaur jersey and doing VC’s famed 360 dunk — which got Mitchell the 48 points he needed to hold-off Nance and win the contest. It was over.

“Growing up I was a big dunker,” Mitchell said. “I wasn’t really much of a basketball player. I just dunked and played defense, and I watched a lot of Vince’s videos. I’ve been seeing what he’s been doing all year at his age, which is incredible.

“So I figured, you know, at my size if I was able to get it, it would be a great dunk and a way to finish it, you know. And actually, funny story is I haven’t made that dunk in like half a year. I tried it in practice the past two days and tried it this morning, didn’t make it. Tried it last night, didn’t make it… But to be able to make it was why I was so excited.”

Earlier in the night, Mitchell had done another tribute worn a Darrell Griffith jersey — Utah’s Dr. Dunkenstien, who went to Louisville like Mitchell — for an off-the-side-of-the-backboard jumping over Kevin Hart dunk.

“You know, just knowing your history, I think, is the biggest thing,” Mitchell said of the throwbacks. “Just understanding where this game originated, I guess the OGs of the game, I guess you would call it. But just understanding. Even if it’s just dunking. Whether it’s dunking in the NBA in general, Darrell Griffith, we went to the same school in college. I know Darrell very well. Both got drafted by the Jazz, and he was an incredible player. To be able to pay homage to him meant a lot to me.”

For my money, Nance had the dunk of the night, his first in the Finals, a double off-the-backboard throwdown that you had to see on replay to get (it wasn’t as evident in the building what he had done until it was re-shown on the big screen).

It was a fun contest all night long.

Mitchell (the leader in the Rookie of the Year race) started it off brilliantly — he brought out a second backboard, and did a self-alley-oop off one to the other.

Larry Nance Jr. did his tribute to his father with his first dunk, and on his second one came from behind the backboard, going around the world, and threw it down hard. That got him into the Finals.

Oladipo missed all three of his dunks in the first round, which almost doomed his night. He, however, did a dunk wearing the Black Panther mask for his second dunk, which impressed.

Mitchell said he wanted to beat Dennis Smith Jr. because the Mavericks’ point guard had beaten him in dunk contests for years. Smith had one monster dunk, when he went between the legs and threw it down hard and got the full 50. It just wasn’t enough to get Smith to the Finals.

Nance started off the final round by bringing out his father again to throw an alley-oop to a windmill. Mitchell responded with a self-alley-oop to a windmill that was flat-out wicked. That got Mitchell a 50-46 lead after one round of the Finals.

Then Mitchell went to Vince Carter and “it was over.”

Larry Nance Jr. throws alley-oop to himself, throws alley-oop to himself (video)

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LOS ANGELES — Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. immediately motioned for the replay to be shown of this dunk. It was necessary to properly appreciate it.

Best dunk of the night.

Donovan Mitchell won the dunk contest, though.

Larry Nance Jr. plays tribute to father — rock-the-cradle dunk in Suns uniform

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LOS ANGELES — Back in 1984, high-flying Larry Nance Sr. won the first NBA All-Star Dunk Contest with this set of dunks — most famously a rock-the-cradle move.

Larry Nance Jr. came into the 2018 Dunk Contest and went nostalgic — all the way back to the Suns’ throwback uniform and the same dunk.

That and a good second dunk got him into the Dunk Contest finals. In that round, Nance Sr. threw an alley-oop to his son for the windmill.

Donovan Mitchell throws alley-oop to himself – off second backboard (video)

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LOS ANGELES – Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell set a high standard with the first slam of the 2018 dunk contest.

Very creative. Very well-executed.

Looks like all that preparation paid off.