The Extra Pass: Kevin Durant’s shot at history

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The Extra Pass is a new daily column that’s designed to give you a better look at a theme, team, player or scheme. Today, we look at Kevin Durant’s chance to make NBA history.

For the last three seasons, Kevin Durant has led the NBA in scoring. That’s no easy task, but doing it again this year is going to be quite the challenge.

Kobe Bryant is the current points per game leader, and if the Lakers do end up out of the playoff hunt, we know exactly what he’ll be gunning for. Out in New York, Carmelo Anthony is having his best year ever and is scoring from all over the court. James Harden lurks as a darkhorse who will get all the shots he can handle, and LeBron James is always a threat to win it — if he feels like it. Point is, the competition for the scoring title this year will be stiff.

Of course, there’s history on the side of the challengers as well. Five players in NBA history have led the league in scoring three straight seasons, but only Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain have done it four years in a row.

But if Durant can beat out the competition and secure the scoring title, he’ll have a chance to do something no one in NBA history has ever done — not Jordan, not Wilt — no one.

The 180 Shooter

A “180 shooter” is a player whose field goal percentage (at least 50%), 3-point percentage (at least 40%) and free throw percentage (at least 90%) add up to 180 or greater. It’s a term coined by the late, great Rick Majerus, who was full of little nuggets of basketball wisdom.

Since the 3-point line was introduced in the 1979-80 season, the NBA has had seven different players join the 180 club. It’s almost basketball’s equivalent to baseball’s Triple Crown, albeit more common.

Only the best of the best of the best shooters gain this distinction. Larry Bird, Reggie Miller, Dirk Nowitzki, Mark Price, Steve Nash, Steve Kerr and Jose Calderon have all had 50-40-90 years that placed them in the 180 club.

Durant’s résumé

Durant is obviously a great shooter, but he hasn’t so much as sniffed the 180 club in his career. Despite that beautiful jumper, he has never shot over 50 percent from the field, and he’s only eclipsed 40 percent 3-point shooting and 90 percent free throw shooting once, and in different seasons at that. If you were to guess which players were most likely to join the club going into this year, Stephen Curry, Steve Nash or Jose Calderon would have been much better choices given their past performances.

With all that said, it’s pretty easy to forget that Durant is only 24-years-old. He’s still perfecting his shot and finding ways to free himself up for better looks, which is terrifying for the rest of the league, but great for his numbers.

Where Durant stands today

Going into Wednesday night’s games, Durant is shooting 52 percent from the field, 40 percent from the 3-point line, and 90 percent from the foul line. If the season ended today, Durant would become the eighth player in NBA history to post percentages of 50-40-90.

What does that mean in the grand scheme of things? Excluding Calderon, the last two members to join the club (Nowitzki and Nash) have won the league MVP. Obviously there are other factors at play, but it doesn’t hurt to solidify yourself as the league’s best shooter when it’s time to tally the votes.

But here’s where Durant can really separate himself from his current peers and past shooting legends. If Durant can manage to win the scoring title and keep these percentages intact, he’ll be the only 180 shooter in NBA history to lead the league in scoring.

All by himself

There are a few reasons why Durant would be the only player to have ever done this. The first is obvious enough: bigger point totals almost always come at the cost of efficiency.

The second reason why this hasn’t happened? Michael Jeffrey Jordan. In the 1987-88 season, Larry Bird averaged a whopping 29.9 points per game, but that was only good for third on the scoring list. Dominique Wilkins, maybe the most underrated player ever, averaged 30.7 points a game that year for the Hawks. But MJ? He averaged a ridiculous 35 points per game. Think about how crazy that is. We make a big deal when a player drops 40, but Jordan nearly averaged that.

That’s part of what makes Durant’s potential accomplishment so impressive. There aren’t many individual feats MJ left unclaimed, but this is one of them. And in what is already shaping up as one of the league’s hottest MVP races of recent memory, with Durant, James, Chris Paul, Anthony, and Tim Duncan all in contention, doing something no one has ever done before may end up tipping the scales in Durant’s favor.

Andrew Bogut signs to play in NBL in native Australia

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Back in January, the Los Angeles Lakers waived Andrew Bogut. He had a very limited role on a Los Angeles team that was not making the playoffs, serving as a backup big man against teams who use a traditional center. That’s not much of a role anymore. He’s a center who can pass, shoot from the midrange a little, and knows where to be defensively, but the game has evolved as Bogut’s skills have faded. Bogut tried to latch on with a contender for the playoffs, but could not find a team to take him.

So he is going home.

Bogut is signing to play for the Sydney Kings in Australia’s NBL.

Bogut was the first No. 1 draft pick from Australia when he was selected by the Milwaukee Bucks in 2005. He made the All-Rookie team that season, was All-NBA in 2010, but may be best known for his role as a crucial part of the defense of the NBA champion Golden State Warriors in 2015 (and his injury during the 2016 Finals is an underrated reason Cleveland was able to pull off a miracle comeback).

At age 33 Bogut may not have a spot in the NBA, but in the NBL he both will thrive for a few more years but also be a huge draw and get the welcome home from fans that he deserves.

When Lance Stephenson gets a traveling call, he earns it (VIDEO)

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Yes, guys get away with traveling in the NBA. James Harden on the step back (sometimes, not always), or guys sliding left/right to avoid a closeout at the arc and not bothering to dribble while they do it.

Lance Stephenson got called for traveling Sunday in the Pacers’ loss to the Cavaliers. In a game where Stephenson got under the skin of LeBron James and drew a technical (and tied him up for a jump ball at one point), this was the best Lance highlight of the game. Because if you’re going to travel, you should go all in.

Never change Lance. Never change.

Matthew Dellavedova steals pass, hits wild scoop shot at buzzer (VIDEO)

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Matthew Dellavedova is a hustler. Everybody knows that. Well, unless you want to argue he’s more about grit. It’s really your call.

But against the Boston Celtics on Sunday, Dellavedova came through with whatever you want to call it — hustle, grit, moxie, gumption.

As the first quarter wound down and the Celtics tried to inbound the ball, Dellavedova spied his opponents rolling the basketball in order to save time on the clock.

That allowed the Australian native to fly in and do this:

That’s a steal, a scoop, and a score all within 1.2 seconds.

Milwaukee won Game 4 and evened the series with the Celtics, 2-2.

Cavaliers tie series with Pacers in Indiana, 2-2

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Sunday night’s game between the Indiana Pacers and Cleveland Cavaliers was raucous. Bankers Life Fieldhouse was rocking, and despite Indiana’s best effort to put back seemingly every offensive board it encountered, LeBron James‘ 32 points was just too much to overcome.

Facing the possibility of going down 3-1 in the first round, the Cavaliers pulled out the win, 104-100, and sent the series back to Ohio for Game 5.

The game came down to the final period following a surge by the Pacers to end the third quarter. The teams were tied several times midway through the fourth, but a tip shot by Thaddeus Young wth 6:13 left gave the Pacers the lead as fans in Indiana went wild.

Cleveland then came roaring back. At the three-minute mark, James drove to the basket and scored. Thirty seconds later, Kyle Korver hit a big-time 3-pointer to put the Cavaliers up by four points, a mark the Pacers couldn’t recover from.

LeBron scored again with 1:52 left, and despite some weird late-game antics — featuring none other than Lance Stephenson — the Cavaliers were able to remain resolute down the stretch.

James finished with 32 points, 13 rebounds, and seven assists. Kyle Korver added 18 points on 4-of-9 shooting from deep, and Kevin Love had five points with 11 boards.

Victor Oladipo struggled for Indiana, scoring 17 points but shooting just 25 percent from the floor. Seven Pacers finished in double-digits, with Young notching an impressive double-double of 12 points and 16 rebounds.

Game 5 will be played in Cleveland on Wednesday, April 25.