San Antonio Spurs v Golden State Warriors

Spurs sued by Miami lawyer for resting top players vs. Heat

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If you buy any product any product and it’s not what it is promised to be, you can ultimately sue the company that made it to get your money back.

Should you be able to sue a professional sports team if they do not provide the players expected to perform?

One Miami lawyer thinks so (and wants some publicity) so he has sued the San Antonio Spurs over he Thursday night game earlier this season when Gregg Popovich sent Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili. Darren Rovell at ESPN has the story.

On Monday, Larry McGuinness filed a class action suit in Miami-Dade County, stating that the team’s head coach, Gregg Popovich, “intentionally and surreptitiously” sent their best players home without the knowledge of the league, the team and the fans attending the Nov. 29 game against the Heat. McGuinness contends that he, as well as other fans, “suffered economic damages” as a result of paying a premium price for a ticket that shouldn’t cost more…

“It was like going to Morton’s Steakhouse and paying $63 for porterhouse and they bring out cube steak,” said McGuinness, who said he bought his ticket on the resale market. “That’s exactly what happened here.”

Not exactly. The Spurs reserves were not cube steak, they almost won in a dramatic game that came down to the final minutes. They are professional athletes, not some high school team. The entire suit seems to suggest that in buying a ticket to a live event you do not have any risk in the players who will be performing that day, which flies in the face of common sense.

However, is one of the challenges of the tiered ticket pricing a lot of teams are going to — it costs more to see the Heat or the Thunder or other elite/big draw teams than it does to see the Bobcats and Magic. While there is always a risk that a player or players may not play, if I’m paying more to see Duncan, Parker and Ginobili I want to see them. Especially if they are not injured.

You have to think this guy’s case is bolstered a little by the fact David Stern apologized to fans and fined the Spurs $250,000 for the incident.

The legal issues here could be interesting. Is the risk that key players may sit assumed in buying the ticket to a live event like this (sometimes on Broadway you get the understudy for a night)? Did he actually get his money’s worth? Does he even really have standing here?

To me, it sounds like a lawyer trying to get some publicity, but it will be interesting to see if he can find and make a case.

Dwight Howard commits ridiculously sloppy inbound violation (video)

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An embarrassing lack of focus by the Rockets? I can hardly believe it.

Late in a game against a team Houston is battling for playoff position, Dwight Howard was just careless, stepping on the baseline as he inbounded the ball. It’s a needless goof, and he’ll get plenty of deserved criticism for it.

But don’t overlook Patrick Beverley‘s frustration foul on Damian Lillard before the ensuing inbound. That was nearly as foolish and even more costly.

The sequence sparked a 7-0 run for the Trail Blazers, who seized control of the game en route to a 116-103 win.

DeAndre Jordan dunks on Marcus Smart before Smart knows what’s happening (video)

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Marcus Smart went to tag DeAndre Jordan on the pick-and-roll, and Jordan took off from so far from the basket, he was dunking on Smart before the Celtics guard could do a thing.

Chris Paul finds brilliant counter to hack-a-DeAndre Jordan (video)

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I originally favored allowing Hack-a-Shaq as the NBA currently does. I found the strategy fascinated – why and when teams would use it and how their opponents would counter.

But it just became too common. Far too many games featured a parade of trips to the line, a boring stretch that made games too long. I thought the intrigue had run its course.

Then, Chris Paul pulled this move last night.

The Clippers guard saw Jonas Jerebko charging toward DeAndre Jordan to commit an intentional foul, so Paul stepped in front of an unsuspecting Jerebko and took the foul himself. That’s sent a good free-throw shooter to the line instead of the dismal Jordan.

Just an awesome heady play by Paul.