Los Angeles Lakers v Sacramento Kings

Bruski: Sacramento lines up offers in effort to keep Kings


It has been a whirlwind of a week for Kings fans and the Sacramento Kings relocation story in general.

We reported first in this saga that ‘Kings to Seattle’ was not a done deal, as sources close to negotiations told us there were many hurdles for the deal to clear, and that Sacramento had multiple, qualified buyers that could either meet or beat Chris Hansen’s offer.

This has played out over the last 24 hours as multiple buyer groups have stepped up in Sacramento to buy the Kings, including a group that is connected to Ron Burkle.

In terms of the math and money, as we reported in September the reason Sacramento has a shot against top-tier owner prospects such as Seattle’s Hansen and billionaire deluxe Steve Ballmer is that they don’t have to pay as much for the team.

Anybody moving the team will have to account for at least $100 million in unpaid loans to Sacramento (~$75 million) and relocation fees (~$30 million), and this is a very low estimate. That number increases as you account for moving costs, and the fact that the relocation fee could be more than $30 million. We’re reporting that this number could go as high as $300 million if the league really wants to flex its muscles in getting what it wants.

Our report Thursday estimated a $425-450 million price tag for Sacramento to hit in order to start outperforming Seattle’s offer. Sam Amick of USA Today was able to confirm with Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson at his charity event that this was indeed the city’s initial target, and also that the mayor would be approaching David Stern to speak at the NBA’s Board of Governors meeting.

In a moment of levity at that charity event, attendee LeBron James was asked by Johnson if he could buy the Kings and keep them in Sacramento and he responded with, “get me my check book.

LeBron isn’t going to have to reach far because Sacramento buyers have been making themselves known over the past 24 hours. Mark Mastrov, former CEO of 24 Hour Fitness and San Francisco investment firm JMA Ventures have thrown their hats in the ring.

JMA Ventures is proposing to buy the team and build a $400 million downtown arena where a downtown mall they recently purchased currently sits. CBS 13’s Steve Large reports that group includes Darius Anderson, who is the same man that connected mayor Johnson to Ron Burkle.

According to sources there are more interested buyers being filtered through the process, too. The Sacramento market is all-but rubber stamped with $200 million or more of public investment toward a new arena and has an extreme level of fan support. Being the No. 20 television market doesn’t hurt, but having no other sports teams to compete with is what puts it in the same category as a larger market like Seattle, which has the Seahawks, Mariners, and Sounders to steal entertainment dollars.

In Sacramento, all they have is the Kings.

Assuming Hansen and his group don’t want to start acting like the drunk guy at an auction, then the NBA is going to be choosing between two similar offers. The owners in Sacramento might not be Ballmer-rich, but Burkle was good enough to drop David Stern’s jaw and Mastrov finished second to Joe Lacob’s group in Golden State, ahead of Larry Ellison.

The NBA isn’t picking between steak and chopped liver, here.

But if for some reason they don’t let California’s capitol city have a shot here, and they allow the team to be moved to Seattle, then the NBA will be the ones left holding the Sacramento’s beating heart after the Maloofs rip it out of their convulsing chest.

Charles Barkley said it best on TNT:

“I’ve always like the Maloof brothers, but they’ve screwed this thing up royally. All these teams try to screw these cities, that’s what the deal is. I don’t think it’s right for all poor people to build these cities all these major stadiums year after year after year. Every ‘x’ amount of years, they screw the fans and the taxpayers and make them build them bigger stadiums and bigger stadiums and bigger stadiums. I think these owners are worth so much money … does a city benefit? Of course a city benefits. But this thing in all sports been screwing these fans for the last 30 years, moving from city to city. Because those people in Sacramento, those were some of the best fans in the world. They screwed Seattle because they wouldn’t give them a new arena, and those fans in Seattle were amazing. But this is all about the owners just being greedy and screwing these fans.”

We’ve reported the NBA’s billion dollar subsidy issue here for nearly two years now, as the league and its players have received over $3 billion in public funds for arenas since 1990.

This happens because the league and its owners pit cities against one another with threats of relocation if a city doesn’t pay up for an arena, but in the case of Sacramento they did everything they could and then some according to multiple league sources.

One league source with intimate knowledge of the situation called it “a model offer of public funds.”

The league is walking dangerously close to the line in which people get fed up and they start to lose those subsidies they love dearly. In Seattle, yes their own politicians screwed up and were culpable in the matter, but the league’s underhandedness and heartlessness was brought to life in the documentary Sonicsgate. It’s not pretty.

But unlike that story that was told after the fact, the saga in Sacramento is playing out in real-time. The NBA media is getting constant updates on their Twitter feed about the incompetent, despicable Maloof family and how they’re leaving the house in worse condition than they found it.

This twisted tale is filtering all the way down to the fans, and when Charles Barkley talks about the deplorable business tactics of the NBA on TNT the cat is out of the bag.

This isn’t just league insider talk anymore, it’s coffee talk.

If the Kings leave Sacramento, it will transcend sport. The story of Sacramento Kings fans, arena workers, and the like will make the morning talk show rounds, ultimately culminating in a national discussion about the role of public money in professional sports.

Seattle — a victim of the system – is excited that their Sonics might be coming home, but the mere exercise of having to replace the team that was stolen from them is a trying experience.

And even if they can secure an NBA team, some Sonics fans are having trouble with their own moral relativism.

For years they’ve railed on the NBA for stealing their team and now they’re trying to steal Sacramento’s team. They’re slowly understanding what it means to have that blood on their hands, and many Seattleites are already speaking out saying the juice isn’t worth the squeeze – especially when they know they stand a very good chance of getting a team down the road under more moral circumstances.

Unlike the Oklahoma City fans that can point at Seattle’s politicians and argue that they slept on the job – Seattle fans have no such target.  Kevin Johnson has moved mountains to keep this team while the Maloof family can’t get out of their own way.

Besides wanting to move the team since they purchased it and ruining every arena deal the city tried to create in good faith, the Maloofs sold profitable businesses to build a pipe dream casino a mile off the strip in Vegas and it led to their downfall.

Rather than atoning for their financial mistakes, the Maloofs have dragged the league through embarrassment after embarrassment through the years, all because they cannot afford to own an NBA team.

Every subsequent episode is their worst one and the shenanigans come with increasing frequency, as just Friday night a report surfaced that their Palms Casino was getting popped with a $1 million fine for a prostitution and cocaine ring (no word if the price of the Kings just went up).

This isn’t a case of Sacramento not deserving the team, or not having the wherewithal to keep the team, but rather a case of a Maloof family that makes Antoine Walker look like Warren Buffett.

Sacramento has been paying for this Maloofery for years, and nobody is comfortable with an indecent proposal leaving Kevin Johnson at the altar. Not Stern, not Seattle, and probably not Gavin and Joe Maloof — whose love of Sacramento has been trumped by brotherly grudges and family needs.

It’s against this twisted backdrop that sources close to the situation believe Sacramento has a chance, and some sources believe they are actually favored to keep their team. I happen to share that belief.

Once again it all comes back to the NBA. They can tell the Maloofs what to do here. If the offers between the cities are close, they can decline the move to Seattle and force the Maloofs to take them to court in an antitrust case if they don’t like it.  There, the league can show a laundry list of claims that show the Maloofs are putting the league’s subsidy industry at tremendous risk by selling to Hansen.

After all, what city or politician can sell their constituents on making a long-term investment in the NBA when Sacramento did everything a city could to protect their investment and got told to kick rocks.

Also in the NBA’s arsenal would be the aforementioned increased relocation fee up to $300 million, and if push comes to shove David Stern can remove the family from the league using the ‘best interest of the league’ clause.

Regardless of what some of their intermediaries might like you to think, the Maloofs aren’t going to wade too far into those waters.

With the family’s debt to the league upwards of $127 million and as high as $217 million by some reports, and their financial situation a total mess, they’re bringing a whoopee cushion to a gun fight if they want to go to court.  And if they do, they won’t have the law on their side unless Hansen can drastically overpay for the franchise, giving the Maloofs the argument that the league is costing them significant money by forcing them to sell to Sacramento.

Even then, the cash-strapped and beleaguered Maloofs would still have to win that battle in court.

Looking outside the courtroom and toward the league office, there has been a lot of talk about the wrongs that David Stern wants to ‘right’ in Seattle, and how he wants to remove that inscription from his tombstone.

You can’t cross out Seattle’s name and simply write in Sacramento’s and change your legacy.  We all learned in kindergarten that two wrongs don’t make a right.

But that’s not what’s really at stake here.

As usual it comes down to the money, and with all things equal in this case the threat of killing the public subsidy goose will be the tiebreaker.

With Kevin Johnson’s legitimate, comparable offer from more-than-reputable buyers in hand, the NBA will have to both look a gift horse in the mouth and sanction Sacramento’s open-heart surgery if they move the team to Seattle.

And if they do, it’s going to leave a mark. A $3 billion mark.

And unless you’re the Golden State Warriors that’s not good for business.

Beef? Bradley Beal says he wouldn’t have re-signed with Wizards and John Wall says he wouldn’t have begged Beal back if true

Bradley Beal, John Wall
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
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John Wall and Bradley Beal defined their relationship this summer.

Wall: “I think a lot of times we have a tendency to dislike each other on the court.”

Beal: “It’s tough because we’re both alphas. … Sometimes I think we both lose sight of the fact that we need each other.”

It’s hard to spin those direct quotes. These aren’t anonymous sources or players venting after a tough loss. In the calm of the offseason, Wall and Beal spoke bluntly about their partnership in the Wizards backcourt.

But no matter how difficult now, Beal and Wall are trying to cast their relationship in a different light.

Michael Lee of Yahoo Sports:

“This is my brother at the end of the day,” Beal told The Vertical. “Nothing is going to change. If I didn’t want to be here, if we did beef, I wouldn’t have signed my contract. That’s what it ultimately comes down to.”

“And I wouldn’t have begged him to come back,” Wall interjected. “I would’ve been, ‘Don’t come back because in two years, I ain’t coming back.’ We would’ve figured something out. … I think everybody blew it out of proportion for no reason. I mean, if you look at any two great teammates, and two young, great guys, that’s talented and want to be great, you’re going to have ups and downs. Everything is not going to be perfect.”

The flaws in that logic:

Beal was a restricted free agent. The Wizards weren’t letting him go.

Wall is locked up for three more years. It’s in his best interest to have the best teammates possible in that time, whether or not he stays in Washington past 2019. The Wizards had no way to replace Beal with a similar-caliber player.

So, maybe Wall and Beal are completely cohesive. But even if they aren’t, circumstances dictated they continue their basketball partnership.

I believe last summer’s interviews exposed a rift that was forming somewhat beneath the surface. Their honest assessments in the open, Wall and Beal can now go about repairing any cracks in the foundation.

There’s an mostly unavoidable tension between a team’s two leading scorers. That they’re both guards who want to handle the ball makes it only more difficult.

But if Wall and Beal acknowledge their problems, they can try to work past them and win together.

Manu Ginobili: ‘I gave my right one for the Spurs. I can say it. I can really say it’

San Antonio Spurs guard Manu Ginobili (20) poses for photos during Spurs Media Day, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
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Manu Ginobili missed weeks last season due to a testicular injury.

Once you finish wincing, let’s share a good laugh.

Casey Keirnan of News 4 San Antonio asked Ginobili whether he’s familiar with the phrase “I’d give my left…”


I gave my right one. I gave it all. I gave it all. I gave my right one for the Spurs. I can say it. I can really say it. True.

Why again did we anoint Tim Duncan THE franchise icon in San Antonio? I don’t think he ever made that level of sacrifice to the Spurs.

Report: Timberwolves declining Adreian Payne’s fourth-year option

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 7: Adreian Payne #33 of the Minnesota Timberwolves shoots a basket against Mitch McGary #33 of the Oklahoma City Thunder during the fourth quarter of the preseason game on October 7, 2015 at Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Thunder defeated Timberwolves 122-99. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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A few players – Mitch McGary, Jordan Adams and R.J. Hunter – had their rookie-scale-contract team options declined as their teams waived them this offseason. Another player, P.J. Hairston, had his third-year option declined last fall.

But only one player that we know of so far from the 2013 and 2014 draft classes remains on a team but won’t finish his rookie-scale deal:

Timberwolves forward Adreian Payne, the No. 15 pick in 2014.

Minnesota will decline his $3,100,094 team option for 2017-18, a decision that will become official Tuesday.

Darren Wolfson of 1500 ESPN:

Payne will become an unrestricted free agent next summer. The Timberwolves can re-sign him, but only at a starting salary up to $3,100,094. Any other team can offer up to the max.

Payne probably won’t be worth $3,100,094 next summer. He’s a stretch four without 3-point range and a long 2-point jumper that is expectedly inefficient. He doesn’t move well enough in any direction, including vertically, to defend well. The concern on him coming out of Michigan State – that he relied too heavily on beating up on younger players – looks valid. Payne will be a 26-year-old free agent.

But $3,100,094 is a small amount against a large salary cap. Is it really worth letting Payne hit the open market without seeing what he does this season first?

This is the problem the Pacers ran into with Solomon Hill. They declined his $2,306,019 2016-17 team option, and he had a breakout year. He signed a four-year, $52 million contract with the Pelicans this summer as Indiana could do nothing but watch.

I don’t expect Payne to duplicate Hill’s emergence, but the Pacers obviously didn’t see it coming with Hill, either. As long as Payne remains on the team, it’s probably worth Minnesota buying itself an extra year of potentially cheap labor.

If Payne develops, he could be an irreplaceable bargain. If he doesn’t, it won’t cost much to waive him – especially because the Timberwolves can stretch him.

Even if the odds are against that plan bearing fruit, the upside is high enough to justify exercising the option.

But Minnesota apparently feels differently. Barring a sudden change of plans in the next few days, Payne will be on an expiring contract.

Kobe Bryant says he was nearly late to final game, because was busy editing short stories

LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 13:  Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers waves to the crowd as he is taken out of the game after scoring 60 points against the Utah Jazz at Staples Center on April 13, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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Already eliminated from the playoff chase, the Jazz weren’t focused for Kobe Bryant’s final game. They ceded 60 points to the over-the-hill superstar.

How locked in was Kobe?

Kobe via Thu-Huong Ha of Quartz:

“I was actually at the office until 4 or 4:15 editing a bunch of short stories, and lost track of time,” Bryant told the Wall Street Journal’s Dennis K. Berman. “And I looked at my watch, ‘Oh…I better go home. I got my last game to play.’”

Kobe clearly summoned a will to compete by the time he reached the arena. That was a sendoff for the ages.

But this is another sign he was ready for the next chapter in his life.