Bruski: Sacramento lines up offers in effort to keep Kings

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It has been a whirlwind of a week for Kings fans and the Sacramento Kings relocation story in general.

We reported first in this saga that ‘Kings to Seattle’ was not a done deal, as sources close to negotiations told us there were many hurdles for the deal to clear, and that Sacramento had multiple, qualified buyers that could either meet or beat Chris Hansen’s offer.

This has played out over the last 24 hours as multiple buyer groups have stepped up in Sacramento to buy the Kings, including a group that is connected to Ron Burkle.

In terms of the math and money, as we reported in September the reason Sacramento has a shot against top-tier owner prospects such as Seattle’s Hansen and billionaire deluxe Steve Ballmer is that they don’t have to pay as much for the team.

Anybody moving the team will have to account for at least $100 million in unpaid loans to Sacramento (~$75 million) and relocation fees (~$30 million), and this is a very low estimate. That number increases as you account for moving costs, and the fact that the relocation fee could be more than $30 million. We’re reporting that this number could go as high as $300 million if the league really wants to flex its muscles in getting what it wants.

Our report Thursday estimated a $425-450 million price tag for Sacramento to hit in order to start outperforming Seattle’s offer. Sam Amick of USA Today was able to confirm with Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson at his charity event that this was indeed the city’s initial target, and also that the mayor would be approaching David Stern to speak at the NBA’s Board of Governors meeting.

In a moment of levity at that charity event, attendee LeBron James was asked by Johnson if he could buy the Kings and keep them in Sacramento and he responded with, “get me my check book.

LeBron isn’t going to have to reach far because Sacramento buyers have been making themselves known over the past 24 hours. Mark Mastrov, former CEO of 24 Hour Fitness and San Francisco investment firm JMA Ventures have thrown their hats in the ring.

JMA Ventures is proposing to buy the team and build a $400 million downtown arena where a downtown mall they recently purchased currently sits. CBS 13’s Steve Large reports that group includes Darius Anderson, who is the same man that connected mayor Johnson to Ron Burkle.

According to sources there are more interested buyers being filtered through the process, too. The Sacramento market is all-but rubber stamped with $200 million or more of public investment toward a new arena and has an extreme level of fan support. Being the No. 20 television market doesn’t hurt, but having no other sports teams to compete with is what puts it in the same category as a larger market like Seattle, which has the Seahawks, Mariners, and Sounders to steal entertainment dollars.

In Sacramento, all they have is the Kings.

Assuming Hansen and his group don’t want to start acting like the drunk guy at an auction, then the NBA is going to be choosing between two similar offers. The owners in Sacramento might not be Ballmer-rich, but Burkle was good enough to drop David Stern’s jaw and Mastrov finished second to Joe Lacob’s group in Golden State, ahead of Larry Ellison.

The NBA isn’t picking between steak and chopped liver, here.

But if for some reason they don’t let California’s capitol city have a shot here, and they allow the team to be moved to Seattle, then the NBA will be the ones left holding the Sacramento’s beating heart after the Maloofs rip it out of their convulsing chest.

Charles Barkley said it best on TNT:

“I’ve always like the Maloof brothers, but they’ve screwed this thing up royally. All these teams try to screw these cities, that’s what the deal is. I don’t think it’s right for all poor people to build these cities all these major stadiums year after year after year. Every ‘x’ amount of years, they screw the fans and the taxpayers and make them build them bigger stadiums and bigger stadiums and bigger stadiums. I think these owners are worth so much money … does a city benefit? Of course a city benefits. But this thing in all sports been screwing these fans for the last 30 years, moving from city to city. Because those people in Sacramento, those were some of the best fans in the world. They screwed Seattle because they wouldn’t give them a new arena, and those fans in Seattle were amazing. But this is all about the owners just being greedy and screwing these fans.”

We’ve reported the NBA’s billion dollar subsidy issue here for nearly two years now, as the league and its players have received over $3 billion in public funds for arenas since 1990.

This happens because the league and its owners pit cities against one another with threats of relocation if a city doesn’t pay up for an arena, but in the case of Sacramento they did everything they could and then some according to multiple league sources.

One league source with intimate knowledge of the situation called it “a model offer of public funds.”

The league is walking dangerously close to the line in which people get fed up and they start to lose those subsidies they love dearly. In Seattle, yes their own politicians screwed up and were culpable in the matter, but the league’s underhandedness and heartlessness was brought to life in the documentary Sonicsgate. It’s not pretty.

But unlike that story that was told after the fact, the saga in Sacramento is playing out in real-time. The NBA media is getting constant updates on their Twitter feed about the incompetent, despicable Maloof family and how they’re leaving the house in worse condition than they found it.

This twisted tale is filtering all the way down to the fans, and when Charles Barkley talks about the deplorable business tactics of the NBA on TNT the cat is out of the bag.

This isn’t just league insider talk anymore, it’s coffee talk.

If the Kings leave Sacramento, it will transcend sport. The story of Sacramento Kings fans, arena workers, and the like will make the morning talk show rounds, ultimately culminating in a national discussion about the role of public money in professional sports.

Seattle — a victim of the system – is excited that their Sonics might be coming home, but the mere exercise of having to replace the team that was stolen from them is a trying experience.

And even if they can secure an NBA team, some Sonics fans are having trouble with their own moral relativism.

For years they’ve railed on the NBA for stealing their team and now they’re trying to steal Sacramento’s team. They’re slowly understanding what it means to have that blood on their hands, and many Seattleites are already speaking out saying the juice isn’t worth the squeeze – especially when they know they stand a very good chance of getting a team down the road under more moral circumstances.

Unlike the Oklahoma City fans that can point at Seattle’s politicians and argue that they slept on the job – Seattle fans have no such target.  Kevin Johnson has moved mountains to keep this team while the Maloof family can’t get out of their own way.

Besides wanting to move the team since they purchased it and ruining every arena deal the city tried to create in good faith, the Maloofs sold profitable businesses to build a pipe dream casino a mile off the strip in Vegas and it led to their downfall.

Rather than atoning for their financial mistakes, the Maloofs have dragged the league through embarrassment after embarrassment through the years, all because they cannot afford to own an NBA team.

Every subsequent episode is their worst one and the shenanigans come with increasing frequency, as just Friday night a report surfaced that their Palms Casino was getting popped with a $1 million fine for a prostitution and cocaine ring (no word if the price of the Kings just went up).

This isn’t a case of Sacramento not deserving the team, or not having the wherewithal to keep the team, but rather a case of a Maloof family that makes Antoine Walker look like Warren Buffett.

Sacramento has been paying for this Maloofery for years, and nobody is comfortable with an indecent proposal leaving Kevin Johnson at the altar. Not Stern, not Seattle, and probably not Gavin and Joe Maloof — whose love of Sacramento has been trumped by brotherly grudges and family needs.

It’s against this twisted backdrop that sources close to the situation believe Sacramento has a chance, and some sources believe they are actually favored to keep their team. I happen to share that belief.

Once again it all comes back to the NBA. They can tell the Maloofs what to do here. If the offers between the cities are close, they can decline the move to Seattle and force the Maloofs to take them to court in an antitrust case if they don’t like it.  There, the league can show a laundry list of claims that show the Maloofs are putting the league’s subsidy industry at tremendous risk by selling to Hansen.

After all, what city or politician can sell their constituents on making a long-term investment in the NBA when Sacramento did everything a city could to protect their investment and got told to kick rocks.

Also in the NBA’s arsenal would be the aforementioned increased relocation fee up to $300 million, and if push comes to shove David Stern can remove the family from the league using the ‘best interest of the league’ clause.

Regardless of what some of their intermediaries might like you to think, the Maloofs aren’t going to wade too far into those waters.

With the family’s debt to the league upwards of $127 million and as high as $217 million by some reports, and their financial situation a total mess, they’re bringing a whoopee cushion to a gun fight if they want to go to court.  And if they do, they won’t have the law on their side unless Hansen can drastically overpay for the franchise, giving the Maloofs the argument that the league is costing them significant money by forcing them to sell to Sacramento.

Even then, the cash-strapped and beleaguered Maloofs would still have to win that battle in court.

Looking outside the courtroom and toward the league office, there has been a lot of talk about the wrongs that David Stern wants to ‘right’ in Seattle, and how he wants to remove that inscription from his tombstone.

You can’t cross out Seattle’s name and simply write in Sacramento’s and change your legacy.  We all learned in kindergarten that two wrongs don’t make a right.

But that’s not what’s really at stake here.

As usual it comes down to the money, and with all things equal in this case the threat of killing the public subsidy goose will be the tiebreaker.

With Kevin Johnson’s legitimate, comparable offer from more-than-reputable buyers in hand, the NBA will have to both look a gift horse in the mouth and sanction Sacramento’s open-heart surgery if they move the team to Seattle.

And if they do, it’s going to leave a mark. A $3 billion mark.

And unless you’re the Golden State Warriors that’s not good for business.

LeBron James: I think Dan Gilbert’s letter was racial

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LeBron James left a job for a more appealing one in 2010. His previous employer, Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, infamously published a letter that called LeBron’s decision a “cowardly betrayal,” “shameful display of selfishness and betrayal,” “shocking act of disloyalty” and “heartless and callous action.” Most ridiculously, Gilbert wrote, “Some people think they should go to heaven but NOT have to die to get there.” Perhaps most hurtfully, Gilbert added LeBron’s choice “sends the exact opposite lesson of what we would want our children to learn. And ‘who’ we would want them to grow-up to become.”

Remember, LeBron completed his contract with Gilbert’s Cavs then sign with the Heat. Gilbert’s reaction was beyond over the top.

It was also probably rooted in racial attitudes that persist since a time rich white men held complete control over the lives of young black men.

LeBron, via Mark Anthony Green of GQ:

Did you feel like Dan Gilbert’s letter was racial?

“Um, I did. I did. It was another conversation I had to have with my kids. It was unfortunate, because I believed in my heart that I had gave that city and that owner, at that point in time, everything that I had. Unfortunately, I felt like, at that point in time, as an organization, we could not bring in enough talent to help us get to what my vision was. A lot of people say they want to win, but they really don’t know how hard it takes, or a lot of people don’t have the vision. So, you know, I don’t really like to go back on that letter, but it pops in my head a few times here, a few times there. I mean, it’s just human nature. I think that had a lot to do with race at that time, too, and that was another opportunity for me to kind of just sit back and say, ‘Okay, well, how can we get better? How can we get better? How can I get better?’ And if it happens again, then you’re able to have an even more positive outlook on it. It wasn’t the notion of I wanted to do it my way. It was the notion of I’m gonna play this game, and I’m gonna prepare myself so damn hard that when I decide to do something off the court, I want to be able to do it because I’ve paid my dues.”

We’ve obviously come a long way since slavery, but the racism used to justify that evil practice lingers. In 2017, few want to be racist. Many more do racist things. Racism is basked into our society, and it will require thoughtful recognition of it to eradicate it.

Gilbert’s letter contained racial undertones, Gilbert attempting to assert a control of LeBron he didn’t rightfully possess. If Gilbert considered how his letter fit into historical context, maybe he wouldn’t have written it. Whether or not Gilbert intended to be racist matters only so much. He danced in racist tones to vilify LeBron.

Now, maybe Gilbert has progressed. He apologized to LeBron for the letter (while trying to woo LeBron back to Cleveland in 2014) and said he’s learning more about the level of racism in this country.

But there’s still an apparent lingering distrust by LeBron toward Gilbert, and LeBron saying he still sometimes thinks about the letter only enhances that. That could matter as LeBron heads toward free agency.

Gregg Popovich rants, calls President Trump a “soulless coward” after recent comments

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Every time he speaks, it seems President Trump says something that is outright, provably false — a lie, if you will. The latest came in a Rose Garden press conference Monday where, when asked about two fallen American soldiers in Niger, he said he would call and “If you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls — a lot of them didn’t make calls — I like to make calls when it’s appropriate.” It didn’t take long for representatives from the former Obama administration — as well as the most recent Bush administration — to come out and say Trump was flat-out wrong, noting the numerous calls, letters, visits to troops at the hospital and more (all of which is easily verified). Even by the end of the same press conference, when pressed by reporters, Trump back pedaled saying maybe Obama did make calls, “I don’t know. That’s what I was told.”

That wasn’t near good enough for Air Force Academy graduate, frequent Trump critic, and Spurs coach Gregg Popovich. He called up one of the people who understands the intersection of sports and politics, Dave Zirin of The Nation, and ranted.

“But his comments today about those who have lost loved ones in times of war and his lies that previous presidents Obama and Bush never contacted their families are so beyond the pale, I almost don’t have the words.

“This man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks that he can only become large by belittling others. This has of course been a common practice of his, but to do it in this manner—and to lie about how previous presidents responded to the deaths of soldiers—is as low as it gets. We have a pathological liar in the White House, unfit intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically to hold this office, and the whole world knows it, especially those around him every day. The people who work with this president should be ashamed, because they know better than anyone just how unfit he is, and yet they choose to do nothing about it. This is their shame most of all.”

Popovich is a thoughtful man who highly prizes intellectual curiosity — he believes he needs to be worldly and understand it better just to properly lead a basketball team. If one is going to lead a nation — or, ostensibly, the world — one has to want to know about it, learn about it, respect its differences. Popovich has thought through things before he speaks. Trump does none of that, he goes by his gut and has no filter, and it makes him sort of Bizzaro Popovich. Which sets the Spurs’ coach off.

We can expect more rants from Pop, Steve Kerr, NBA players and a host of others over the course of the season. NBA players have been emboldened by Adam Silver and the league to speak out, and they will, knowing that with the NBA’s younger, more urban, and more diverse and global fanbase (compared to the NFL) they will not face much if any backlash.

NBA Power Rankings: Preseason rankings for every team from Warriors to Bulls

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They’re back. The weekly NBA Power Rankings from NBC Sports have returned as the NBA season tips off. As always the defending champions start on top — and in the case of the Warriors, the question is will there be more than one week they are not ranked No. 1 this season? These first rankings are pure gut, with a little preseason influence thrown in (once we move 15+ games into the season we have a mathematical system to help guide us, then those figures get massaged by the eye test.

Quick note, these rankings come out on Tuesday to start the season, but starting next week and throughout the NBA season they will come out on Wednesday.

 
Warriors small icon 1. Warriors (last season 67-15). Thanks in part to Kevin Durant’s willingness to sacrifice for the team, Golden State not just brought back but also improved the best team in the NBA. They are going to spend a lot of weeks on top of these rankings. The only question to open the season is does the hangover/jet lag from the China trip still impact them the first couple weeks of the season.

 
Rockets small icon 2. Rockets (55-27). Adding Chris Paul to the James Harden show was a brilliant move, the Rockets will have one of the top three offenses in the NBA this season. However, what may really get this to the conference Finals is the additions of defenders such as Luc Mbah a Moute and P.J. Tucker on the wing. They Rockets outscored teams by 21.9 points per 100 possessions in the preseason, an NBA best number (don’t read much into it, but it’s interesting).

 
Thunder small icon 3. Thunder (47-35).. I think they may be second in this ranking by the end of the season, I like their defense (which should be Top 5), but I’m going to need to see Russell Westbrook, Paul George, and Carmelo Anthony do more than just talk about sacrifices to fully buy in (they looked good together in limited preseason minutes). With Westbrook committed to OKC, George will be asked about his free agency at every turn this season, how will he handle that pressure?

 
Cavaliers small icon 4. Cavaliers (51-31). By the end of the season I think they will be the team best positioned to knock off Golden State — Isaiah Thomas will be healthy (*knocking on wood*), the Cavs still have LeBron James, and they will get to come out of a soft East while the Warriors will have to battle their way out of a deep West. That said, they are not healthy now and will be experimenting with Kevin Love at center.

 
Spurs small icon 5. Spurs (61-21). No Kawhi Leonard in the opener and the question is now much more time will he miss with a lingering quad injury. While the Spurs looked like a mess in the playoffs without Leonard that was against the Warriors, in the regular season they are 14-4 the past two seasons with him sitting. LaMarcus Aldridge is the go-to guy while Leonard is out and he can handle the role.

 
Celtics small icon 6. Celtics (53-29). It’s going to be a circus — one with lots of boos — with Kyrie Irving and company opening on the road in Cleveland. No Marcus Morris the first week of the season with a knee injury, that means rookie Jayson Tatum likely gets the starts. That could add to the one big question about the Celtics — can they get enough stops?

 
Wizards small icon 7. Wizards (49-33). The Wizards looked good and their bench improved during the preseason, which is a nice sign but now they have to do it when it matters. That bench will be tested more early with Markieff Morris missing time due to a sports hernia (the Wizards lost very little time from their starters due to injury last season, that has changed already).

 
Raptors small icon 8. Raptors (51-31). The Raptors are trying to change who they are on offense, with less isolation and more threes — and it worked in the preseason, they scored 110.1 points per 100 possessions. Can they sustain that when the defenses get serious? And how much will they miss the depth that DeMarre Carroll, Cory Joseph, and Patrick Patterson provided?

 
timberwolves small icon 9. Timberwolves (31-51). They added Jimmy Butler, Jeff Teague Taj Gibson, and Jamal Crawford to an already promising young team led by Karl-Anthony Towns — Minnesota is ready to make a leap. Well, if they can defend. They were 27th in defensive rating last season, and they need to get up to the middle of the NBA pack at least. Butler helps, but it’s Towns and Andrew Wiggins learning what to do and putting in the effort night in and night out that will make the biggest difference on that end.

 
Bucks small icon 10. Bucks (42-40). Is this too high a ranking for the Bucks? Maybe. I am betting on a lot of internal improvement with Giannis Antetokounmpo, Thon Maker, Kris Middleton, and Malcolm Brogdon. However, the real key to the Bucks season is if Jason Kidd tweaks his gambling defensive system so the Bucks don’t get torched every time the ball swings sides, do that and this team can move into East’s top four.

 
Nuggets small icon 11. Nuggets (40-42). Denver looked good this preseason in the minutes that both Nicola Jokic and Paul Millsap shared the floor, but the questions are everyone around them. Gary Harris needs to live up to his lofty new contract, and Jamal Murray needs to start looking like the point guard the Nuggets thought they had at the end of last season. Also, is Denver going to defend well enough to make the playoffs?

 
Clippers small icon 12. Clippers (51-31). Talk about a changed roster, new to the Clippers are Danilo Gallinari, Patrick Beverley, Lou Williams, Willie Reed, Sam Dekker, and Montrezl Harrell. Everything still flows through Blake Griffin, and his three-point shot looks improved. The Clippers should be solid on both ends and play faster than they did in the Chris Paul era. This is a playoff team if they can stay healthy, but with this roster it’s a big if (they had their share of minor injuries in the preseason).

 
Blazers small icon 13. Trail Blazers (41-41). It’s just the preseason, but the facts that Portland went 5-0 and Evan Turner found his shooting stroke are both good signs. C.J. Mccollum is suspended for the opener (you can’t leave the bench during an altercation, this isn’t a new rule) so look for Pat Connaughton to get the start.

 
Grizzlies small icon 14. Grizzlies (43-39). The Grizzlies are trying to change their style of play — they played at the fourth fastest pace of any team in the preseason (they were 19th overall in the NBA last season, which was up from previous years). We’ll see if the pace sticks. We’ll see how much the Grizzlies can get out of Chandler Parsons as well (he averaged 14 minutes a game and shot 33 percent in the preseason).

 
Heat small icon 15. Heat (41-41, LW 15). Erik Spoelstra will spend the first part of the season figuring out his rotations (Kelly Olynyk is starting now, James Johnson is coming off the bench), and he needs more of Goran Dragic than the two preseason games he played, but this is a deeper team that should get off to a faster start than last season (but not close the season as fast, either).

 
Jazz small icon 16. Jazz (51-31, LW 7). Utah went 5-0 in the preseason and its offense was the fifth most efficient in the NBA. That’s not going to last, but it’s a good sign that maybe the offense will be somewhat better than projected with Rodney Hood as the playmaker. The defense will be elite with DPOY candidate Rudy Gobert.

 
Pelicans small icon 17. Pelicans (34-48). They have their big two — DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis — plus Jrue Holiday at the point, but the supporting cast is already banged up. Rajon Rondo will miss time with a sports hernia, and Solomon Hill may miss the entire season with a torn hamstring. This team remains one of the big question marks heading into the season, but if it goes sideways things could get ugly fast.

 
Sixers small icon 18. 76ers (28-54). Joel Embiid will start the season on a minutes restriction — Brett Brown said in the teens — and the big man doesn’t like it. Expect the Sixers to be cautious with him all season, we’ll see if he even gets to 55 games. My big question is how good the defense is with him off the court? After a strong preseason, Ben Simmons has moved to the top off everyone’s Rookie of the Year award prediction list.

 
Hornets small icon 19. Hornets (36-46). The Nicolas Batum injury to start the season is a blow. First, they were already thin on the wing and needed his defense, and second the Hornets toughest stretch of the schedule is the first month, so they could get in a hole that’s tough to dig out of. No Batum means rookie Malik Monk gets more run. A lot of people will tune in to see the Dwight Howard redemption project version 3.0, but stay to watch Kemba Walker — he is one of the most entertaining players to watch in the NBA.

Pistons small icon 20. Pistons (37-45. . How did the Pistons’ starting five look in the preseason? Don’t know, they didn’t play a minute together. What we do know is Reggie Jackson — the lynchpin for this team’s playoff chances this season — struggled, like he did much of last season. One thing of note, Andre Drummond was 16-of-20 on free throws in the preseason, if he is knocking those down he just got a lot more dangerous at the end of games.

 
Mavericks small icon 21. Mavericks (33-49). We need to savor having another season of Dirk Nowitzki in the NBA, he remains an all-time great. This season is about developing Dennis Smith Jr. and have him develop chemistry with Harrison Barnes (who was underrated as an isolation scorer last season but now needs to learn to be a playmaker. The Mavericks start out with a tough schedule the first couple of months that puts them in a hole they can’t dig out of.

 
Lakers small icon 22. Lakers (26-56, LW 29). It’s the Lonzo Ball show in Los Angeles, as he brings a buzz on and off the court to this team. Well, unless Kyle Kuzma steals the show again (the Lakers are overloaded at the four thanks to him). Ball will get a boost playing with Brook Lopez on offense. The bigger concern is Brandon Ingram, who shot 37.7 percent in preseason (25 percent from three) and likes to face up in isolation but doesn’t execute that well yet.

 
Kings small icon 23. Kings (32-50). So much to watch development wise with this team. How does De’Aaron Fox come along running the offense (he will come off the bench behind George Hill to start the season)? Can Skal Labissiere and Willie Cauley-Stein form an impressive front line? Is Buddy Hield going to be a starting two guard in the NBA or is he a future gunner sixth man? Also, how will coach Dave Joerger balance minutes for the young players and the veterans on his roster such as Zach Randolph?

 
Magic small icon 24. Magic (29-53). This may be too low for the Magic, who have a lot of talent on paper. Aaron Gordon is back at the four, where he should be, and he looked good this preseason. Jonathon Simmons also looked good and helped the team’s defense this preseason. The pieces still are an odd fit on this team, but Frank Vogel is trying to find rotations that work.

 
Knicks small icon 25. Knicks (31-51 LW 26). Carmelo Anthony is gone but the Knicks biggest problem persists — this is going to be a bad defensive team. With the full triangle offense having been exiled with Phil Jackson, coach Jeff Hornacek wants to run, but to run well a team has to get stops. Is Kristaps Porzingis ready for the load about to be put on his shoulders?

 
Pacers small icon 26. Pacers (42-40, LW 16). This is Myles Turner’s team now, but he will miss having Glenn Robinson III’s floor spacing around him (Robinson’s ankle injury has him out until 2018). On the bright side T.J. Leaf looked better in preseason than he did in Summer League, he will get some run. This team will put the ball in Lance Stephenson’s hands, which is always entertaining.

 
Nets small icon 27. Nets (20-62). They have an interesting backcourt with Jeremy Lin — the undrafted guard who has worked hard on his game and scrapped his way to a solid NBA career — and D’Angelo Russell, the No. 2 pick whose work ethic frustrated the Lakers and they were willing to move on from (he was the sweetener in dumping Timofey Mozgov’s salary). Soft start to the schedule gives them the chance at a decent start.

 
Hawks small icon 28. Hawks (43-39). It’s all about Dennis Schroder and Kent Bazemore creating shots and Mike Budenholzer’s team playing solid defense. This is a rebuilding team (Al Horford and Paul Millsap left in successive summers) and their string of making the playoffs 10 years in a row will end, but they should play hard and be in games, just not able to close them out. They start the season with a five-game road trip.

 
Suns small icon 29. Suns (24-58). They have some interesting young talent in Phoenix with Devin Booker and now rookie Josh Jackson (14 points per game and shot 42 percent from three in the preseason). With Eric Bledsoe running the point the Suns should be able to put up some points, but will the young team get enough stops?

 
Bulls small icon 30. Bulls (41-41, LW 13). Chicago has finally, fully embraced the rebuild. Lauri Markkanen will be the guy to watch this season, he was up-and-down during preseason (1-of-9 in debut, good game against Toronto to close it out) but how does he develop over the course of the season. Rough first week of the season with the Raptors, Spurs, and Cavaliers.

Chris Paul’s free agency decision becomes a documentary

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ASSOCIATED PRESS — Chris Paul had a new home in Los Angeles and the potential for a $200 million contract if he stayed with the Clippers.

He also had reason to doubt a championship would ever come there.

So sometime between walking off the floor after a Game 7 loss with the Clippers last spring and walking back onto it Tuesday night in a Houston Rockets uniform, Paul decided he needed to pack up his family and try for a title elsewhere.

“I just felt that it was time,” Paul said.

His free agency process and decision is the subject of a three-part documentary series titled “Chris Paul’s Chapter 3” that debuts Thursday on ESPN.

The first episode shows Paul’s frustration following the Clippers’ ouster against Utah in the first round of the Western Conference playoffs and his questioning the Clippers’ culture. He had helped them become a perennial playoff team since his arrival in 2011, but not one that ever seriously contended for a title,

“Somewhere, I don’t know when it was – I’m not a saint by any means, it could have a lot do to with me also – but we just weren’t having as much fun,” he said.

He talked with his family and business partners about possibilities with Boston and San Antonio – where he feared Gregg Popovich might only coach for a couple more years – and visited music mogul Jay-Z and Disney CEO Bob Iger for their advice. He began to view Houston as the best option and eventually accepted a trade in late June, agreeing to opt in for the final year of his contract and delaying free agency until next summer.

All that after he had bought a house in Los Angeles across the street from Clippers teammate Paul Pierce, moving his in-laws in last January.

“Truthfully, I didn’t think there was no way that Chris would leave the Clippers,” said Pierce, now retired and an ESPN analyst. “He really built up something special, you know, with getting the Clippers back to being legitimate, make the playoffs every year, (winning) 55 games. He just bought a new home like less than a year ago. He had a $200 million offer on the table. So that really shocked me that he would leave.”

Paul never planned for his first real foray into free agency to become public.

“When it all came together and we saw how it looked it was like, man this would be cool to tell the story of how it’s not just cut and dry, you just pick a team,” Paul said. “We showed the move and everything that goes into it.”

Paul laments having to always have the ball in his hands in Los Angeles – which won’t be a problem alongside James Harden in Houston. And he worries about having to move his two young children, eventually telling his son he can’t go do his job without him. And after they finally move, Hurricane Harvey devastates Houston, a focus of the second episode.

“We are constantly looking for opportunities to bring fans closer to athletes in order to better understand their experience. In this series, Chris Paul gives fans a truly unprecedented look at his free agent decision-making process and how he thinks about both his basketball career and his life off the court,” said Connor Schell, ESPN executive vice president of content.

All three episodes will be available on the ESPN App and on-demand beginning Friday. They will then air next Tuesday from 8-9:30 p.m. EDT on ESPN.

Paul said he learned a lot about the free agency process – but would love to avoid having to do it again next summer.

“In a perfect world you win a championship and there’s nothing to even talk about,” he said.