While everyone talked Seattle, Dallas and Sacramento played a good game (that the Mavs won)

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As people filed into the Sleep Train Arena in Sacramento, it felt like the game was secondary. All everyone was talking about was the reports that the Kings could be sold to the Chris Hansen/Steve Ballmer group out of Seattle and moved.

But despite the best efforts of the Maloof family to seemingly follow the “Major League” model to drive attendance down, Kings fans are loyal. They showed up.

And what they got was a very entertaining game. One that was ultimately frustrating for them because the Kings blew a 17-point third quarter lead to lose 117-112 to the Mavericks in overtime.

As it has been all season, the arena was not full for the Kings game (as is true around most arenas during the season). Our own Aaron Bruski was there and said that the crowd fills in nearly three quarters of the seats, which is actually up from most recent games. There seemed to be a push to be there, to show support.

“With everything that has gone on with out team this year the fans have come out and shown really great energy in our building, have booed us when we need to be booed, but cheered us when we played exciting basketball,” Kings coach Keith smart said before the game.

Sacramento fans love the Kings. It’s the owners that they loath.

Of course, the Maloofs weren’t there for the game. They haven’t been at a game for a while.

But the fans were there and as they have been since 1985. And early on they liked what they saw. DeMarcus Cousins had 12 first quarter points while the Mavericks started 1-10 from floor. But the Kings really didn’t take control until the second quarter when they went on a 13-0 run sparked by Tyreke Evans (who finished with 20 points).

By the middle of the third that lead was at 17 points. Then Dallas started to come back, helped in part by the Kings going with a small lineup when they had owned the paint in the first half. It was gradual comeback until a 16-4 fourth-quarter run gave the Mavericks the lead. At the end of that run it was O.J. Mayo in transition and some old-school Vince Carter isolation in the half court that helped the Mavs stretch out to a six point lead with less than a minute to go.

But John Salmons nailed a pull-up three pointer from two feet beyond the arc to cut the lead in half (Salmons was 3-of-12 before that shot). Of course, Salmons also had the offensive foul driving the lane with 16.7 left with the Kings down 100-98 that seemed to doom them. The Kings were forced to foul Mayo and he made one of two, it was 101-98.

That’s when it happened. With 10 seconds left Cousins had the ball, kicked it out to Isaiah Thomas, who missed a three so bad he banked it in. He might even have been fouled. Tie game, 101-101. And after a Dallas miss we were headed to overtime.

It was close there too, 109-109, with minute to go, when Cousins picks up goaltend on Shaun Marion layup. Then next possession with 41 seconds left Cousins was stripped when triple-teamed in the paint, then frustrated pushed Carter in the face knocking him to the ground. Cousins was assessed a flagrant two foul for it and he was ejected, the Mavs got two free throws and the ball. Carter hit both. (My feeling is it was a flagrant one, but we will see what the league office thinks. Either way was exactly the kind of reactionary emotional play Cousins needs to stop making.)

Still the Kings got another chance. After a Vince Carter missed free throw it was 115-112 Mavericks with 15 seconds left in OT, once again a three could tie it. Thomas tried again and missed badly again, but this one short and right and fell out. And that was pretty much the ballgame.

Now everyone can go back to discussions about the move. Well, that and Cousins.

Magic rookie Jonathan Isaac forgot to put on jersey for debut

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In the above video, Magic rookie Jonathan Isaac can be seen sitting on Orlando’s bench wearing his warmups midway through the first quarter. After a timeout, his seat was empty.

Where did he go?

Isaac, via Chris Barnewall of CBS Sports:

“I didn’t even put my jersey on. I was on the bench and I completely forgot my jersey. I didn’t even put it on,” Isaac said.

When asked when he retrieved his white, pinstriped Magic jersey, he said: “five minutes left in the first quarter. [I left it] sitting right there.”

Isaac checked in a few minutes later – with his jersey on – and quickly scored.

Good thing the Magic’s rotation didn’t call for him to enter the game sooner. And this was obviously easier to laugh off after Orlando beat the Heat.

Nets’ Jeremy Lin out for season

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The fears for Nets point guard Jeremy Lin have been realized.

Nets release:

Brooklyn Nets guard Jeremy Lin has been diagnosed with a ruptured patella tendon of the right knee.  The injury occurred during the fourth quarter of last night’s game at Indiana. Lin is expected to miss the entire 2017-18 season.

This is obviously a devastating setback for Lin, who missed 46 games last season in his first year with Brooklyn. The Nets’ already-slim playoff chances fade further with the loss of arguably their best player, though fellow point guard D'Angelo Russell shined in his Brooklyn debut with 30 points.

The trickle-down effects of this injury are perhaps more intriguing.

This makes the Nets’ first-round pick – owned by the Cavaliers – more valuable. Does that make LeBron James more likely to re-sign with Cleveland next summer (either because the Cavs add a top-flight rookie or trade the selection for a valuable veteran)? Does that alter long-term plans in Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia and elsewhere?

Lin’s injury doesn’t just sting in Brooklyn. It could alter the entire landscape of the NBA.

Report: Gordon Hayward’s earliest possible return is March

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Gordon Hayward‘s agent, Mark Bartelstein, said the Celtics wing was unlikely to return this season following surgery for a broken leg and dislocated ankle.

We’re obviously dealing with unknowns and probabilities, but there’s another spin to the timeline.

Mike Lynch of WCVB:

It’d be great for Hayward and the Celtics if he can return in March. That’d give him time to acclimate before the playoffs, which Boston could still make.

However, this report casts doubt whether the Celtics will receive a disabled-player exception for Hayward. The NBA grants the exception – worth $8,406,000 in this case – if a league-appointed physician rules Hayward is “substantially more likely than not” to be unable to play through June 15.

When he said Hayward would likely miss the season, did Bartelstein mean the regular season, Boston’s season or the entire postseason? Those could be quite different dates. How likely is a player with at least a chance of returning in March to remain out through June 15?

The NBA is fairly lenient on granting disabled-player exceptions. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the Celtics got one.

But I also wouldn’t be surprised if they’re denied – which, in a way, would signal good news for them and Hayward.

Three Things to Know: Giannis Antetokounmpo spoils Boston home opener

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Every night in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, especially on this, the real opening night of the NBA with 22 teams in action. Every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA. Tonight, that includes a few historic numbers… good and bad.

1) Brad Stevens, Celtics have no answer on how to slow Giannis Antetokounmpo either. As a general rule of thumb, if you’re getting mentioned in the record books with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, you’re doing something very right. Monday night, the Greek Freak was rolling to the rim and finishing alley-oops over defenders, hitting floaters and leaners in the lane, and generally using his length to get any shot he wanted against the Celtics on his way to a 37-point, 13 rebound night in Boston. The only other Buck to have an opening night of at least 35 and 10? Yup, one Mr. Abdul-Jabbar.

Put a smaller defender on Antetokounmpo and he shoots right over them. Put a bigger defender on him and he goes around them — or just over them too. Brad Stevens tried a lot of things on defense, and while Al Horford had a little first-half success slowing him nobody did all game as he shot 59.1 percent on his way to dropping 37.

Notice all those shots are close to the rim. Antetokounmpo was a ridiculous 10-of-12 at the rim and 12-of-18 in the paint overall, but just 1-of-4 outside the key. It’s easy to say “make him a jump shooter” but good luck finding anyone who can stay in front of him, or that he can’t just finish over. The man was dunking over Aron Baynes, how do you get anyone much bigger in front of him?

Boston was up four points entering the fourth quarter when the second night of a back-to-back seemed to hit them, they scored just 20 points on 8-of-25 shooting in the final frame, 4-of-21 outside the restricted area. Meanwhile, Antetokounmpo went off for 16 in the fourth as he ramped up his aggressiveness and Brad Stevens and the Celtics had no answer. Marcus Smart was fiery and got into it with Matthew Dellavedova, that may have exemplified Boston’s spirit, but Celtics looked physically and emotionally worn down by the end. Hard to blame them.

Rough start to the season for Boston, who lost Gordon Hayward just minutes into the opener (he’s out for the season), they fell to the Celtics Tuesday night and now are off to an 0-2 start. They will bounce back, but just now how the team with all these new players thought things would start.

2) Jeremy Lin injures knee and there is “tremendous” concern it is serious. Midway through the fourth quarter against the Pacers, Jeremy Lin drove the lane and finished a layup at the rim that looked ordinary — except when he landed he went to the ground grabbing his knee and did not get back up.

This isn’t good. Neither were the reports during and after the play.

Brooklyn was counting on Lin to help stabilize the point guard position and the backcourt with D'Angelo Russell (who had 30 on the night in a losing effort). If Lin is done for all or most of the season, it’s a huge setback for a team that, while bad, was expected to be a little better than in previous seasons. Remember, the Cavaliers have Brooklyn’s first-round pick this season unprotected (part of the Kyrie Irving trade from Boston).

• While we’re on the injury front, Boston’s Gordon Hayward underwent surgery on his dislocated ankle and fractured tibia on Wednesday, and according to his agent he is “unlikely” to return this season. Hayward did send a video message to Celtics fans thanking them. Boston will try to move on, but it’s been a difficult and emotional start to the season for the Celtics.

3) Suns’ season opening performance wasn’t just bad, it was the worst ever. The record for worst opening night loss in NBA history belonged to the 1987 Los Angeles Clippers coached by Gene Shue, who were blown out by Denver by 46 points.

No more. That record now belongs to the Phoenix Suns, who fell at home to the Portland Trail Blazers 124-76 — a 48 point loss. The Suns shot 31.5 percent as a team — Devin Booker was 6-of-17 and didn’t hit a three, Eric Bledsoe was sloppy and reckless all night and finished 5-of-18 with five turnovers and three assists, while Dragan Bender and Marquese Chriss combined to go 1-of-10 off the bench. The Phoenix offense was about as in synch as the left shark, and many possessions ended with a terrible shot being jacked up because, well, somebody had to shoot it.

I’d like to say this was a good omen for the Trail Blazers’ defense, but really it’s impossible to judge how good it was against this offense. It was still a win the Blazers will gladly take, Damian Lillard had 24 points while Pat Connaughton came off the bench for 22.