George Maloof’s Virginia Beach arena ploy falls apart, Seattle rumors heat up

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We never took the Maloofs or Virginia Beach seriously in their talks to move the Sacramento Kings to the eastern seaboard, and predictably the talks officially fell apart when Virginia Beach mayor Will Sessoms declared the deal dead for now on Tuesday.

There were a million reasons that deal was a farce – a sad ploy to manufacture leverage in George Maloof and his family’s ongoing attempt at getting something for nothing in an arena deal.

Still though, this marks the end for yet another painful chapter for Kings fans, who have endured as much uncertainty and shenanigans as any fan base on this side of Seattle.  And as we learned late Tuesday night, the next chapter has already begun.

Super agent David Falk’s daughter Daina tweeted yesterday that Seattle billionaire Chris Hansen has already come to an agreement with the Maloofs to buy the Kings, calling it a “done deal.”  Since those rumors hit the Twittersphere, she backed off a bit on her Facebook page and deleted her tweets at about 9 a.m. ET today (original here).  Seattle writer Chris Daniels wasn’t in a hurry to address the “rumors” last night, adding that “it isn’t over until it’s over” and that’s a point of agreement here.

First off, the idea that a deal is closed is premature since the Board of Governors would have to approve it and that clearly hasn’t happened, let alone with a relocation request attached.  Of course, a deal could be being negotiated in the background between the Maloofs and Hansen with or without the NBA’s participation, and she may be referring to some step in that process, but until she comments further or the next shoe drops this is mere speculation from a potential, albeit unlikely information source.

Either way, we’ll learn a lot in the next 24 hours as the various parties each respond to requests for comment at the start of business today.

As for the Maloofs, Tuesday’s Virginia Beach developments put them back at square one and they are running out of time and money to make their final move. They will either need to come up with a lot more money than they have right now to run a basketball team in the Sacramento market – a market that they torch regularly with their antics – or sell the team and that brings us back to where we were in early September.

For Seattle to ironically take the Kings from Sacramento, Chris Hansen will need to drastically overpay to purchase and move the franchise, and if the notoriously deliberate businessman wants to do that then the NBA will still need to get behind the deal.

Given the fact that Sacramento has come up with a “model offer of public funds” according to one league source, a decision to allow the team to move will not be made lightly, as it will necessarily hurt the league in its negotiations with other cities for future arena subsidies.

In this case, the city of Sacramento has done everything the league could ask for and then some to help build an arena.  The implication is that the league is asking cities for long-term investments of public dollars, but not providing a reasonable expectation of a long-term partnership so long as that city continues to provide reasonable partnership dollars into the future.

The part that is most threatening for the league in this scenario is how publicly embarrassing the Maloof family has become to the NBA, creating a real-life equivalent to the movie Major League, and in this day and age of information those images are exponentially more accessible to the public than they have been in previous arena quagmires.

With the league and its players receiving $3 billion dollars in arena subsidy money since 1990, any shift in public sentiment or political resistance on the issue could cost the league an unfathomable amount.

If Hansen won’t pay drastically more than Sacramento, then the Maloofs will likely need to sell to one of a handful of serious buyers out of California’s capitol city that are ready to buy the team right now.

It’s theoretically possible that another city could come into play, but given the fact that Sacramento is a one-sport town with the No. 20 TV market – chances are moving the franchise won’t make sense for the league or a new owner.

George and his siblings can’t simply do nothing, as the sky is falling at Sleep Train Arena and it’s anybody’s guess when it won’t be suitable for NBA games.  This situation will come to a head and the only question is when the family gives up.

And until the NBA effectively finds a way to nudge George Maloof and his siblings out of their clubhouse, they will continue to panhandle for arena money at the expense of the logo.

We’ll get an update to you guys as soon as we learn whether or not this Seattle rumor has any legs.

Ray Allen tells Orlando court he was ‘catfished’

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ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Retired NBA star Ray Allen believes he is a victim of “catfishing,” and has asked a court to throw out a case where he is accused of stalking someone he met online.

Allen says Bryant Coleman “pretended to be a number of attractive women interested in” him. In documents filed Tuesday, Allen acknowledges he communicated with who he thought were those women and that he eventually entered into an agreement with Coleman to not disclose details of those conversations.

Allen says that agreement was violated.

It was not clear if Coleman has an attorney, and a working phone number for him could not be found. Coleman told the court in a filing Monday that Allen is stalking him; in Allen’s request for an injunction, he says “the reverse is true.”

Klay Thompson interviewed about scaffolding on local news (video)

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Man-on-the-street interviews are a staple of local news.

They just don’t usually include Warriors star Klay Thompson.

But here’s Thompson – in town for Golden State’s win over the Brooklyn Nets on Sunday – talking on Fox 5 New York about walking under scaffolding in the wake of a couple recent scaffolding collapses:

Thompson is the only NBA star who could do this interview so earnestly.

Joel Embiid blocks and stares down Donovan Mitchell, who then pushes flopping 76ers center (video)

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Joel Embiid (when healthy) is running wild over the NBA.

Last night was no different, with Embiid (15 points, 11 rebounds, three assists, two blocks +16) excelling in the 76ers’ 107-86 win over the Jazz. And he let Utah rookie Donovan Mitchell know about it.

After blocking Mitchell in the fourth quarter, Embiid stared down a fallen Mitchell. Mitchell got up and pushed Embiid – listed at nine inches and 35 pounds heavier – to the floor.

Embiid, via NBC Sports Philadelphia:

I flopped, and he got a technical for it. So, that was basically how it happened. But it’s all fun. After the game, we shook hands. It’s just about having fun.

Embiid is having fun. That’s for sure.

LeBron James, Tyronn Lue say LeBron’s minutes no big deal

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LeBron James was on the court a very reasonable 27:16 Monday night, only because the Cavaliers had thrashed the upstart Pistons so badly he didn’t need to play the fourth quarter (116-88 final in that one).

However, on the season LeBron is averaging 37.9 minutes per game, the most in the NBA. He has played 644 total minutes, also tops in the NBA. All this in his 15th year in the league, about to turn 33, with more regular season games played in his career than Michael Jordan. Even Draymond Green has wondered about LeBron’s workload. LeBron himself didn’t disagree, saying the goal is to get the minutes down.

However, as this has become a thing, the Cavaliers are playing it down. Here is Cleveland coach Tyronn Lue after the Detroit win, via Dave McMenamin of ESPN.

“I hear about that all the time,” a somewhat perturbed Lue said. “I played with Michael Jordan when he was 39, he played 37 minutes a night. Karl Malone was 37, played 38 minutes a night, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, Kobe [Bryant]. Everybody’s built different. If you’re one of the greats, sometimes you’ve got to play, sometimes you get rest like tonight.”

The way Kobe’s body broke down on him at the end of his career, is he the guy you want as an example here?

LeBron was not that worried about his minutes after the Detroit win, either.

“You make so much a big thing about my minutes,” James said. “It’s not a huge issue. But at the end of the day, when we can get a win like this, everybody benefits from it. Not just me. Everybody.”

The concern isn’t just the heavy minutes, but the workload — with Isaiah Thomas still out, and right now Derrick Rose and Iman Shumpert as well, basically all the playmaking duties on the team fall on LeBron. He has to carry the Cavs.

With most players, you would say this will distinctly wear on them and could be an issue down the line. With LeBron, normal human rules do not apply. He’s playing at MVP consideration level again early — 28.3 points, 8.5 assists, and 7.4 rebounds a game while shooting 58.2 percent from the floor — and nothing seems to slow him. Maybe eventually the Cavaliers will play well enough consistently there will be more light nights for LeBron, and he can have some games off. For now, however, they need him on the court and performing like a superstar.