The Heat go cold at the wrong time, lose big to the Bucks

13 Comments

Dwyane Wade returned, but Miami’s road woes traveled right along with him to Milwaukee.

After losing to Detroit and the Will Bynum show last night, Miami collapsed in the fourth quarter tonight, falling to the Bucks, 104-85.

Believe it or not, Miami appeared to be in firm control with a little over two minutes left in the third quarter. LeBron James had just hit an impossible fading baseline bank shot from a tough angle, and then had followed it with another tough pull-up bank shot. Miami’s lead was at nine, the Bucks had fallen in love with the long two, and it just felt like one of those classic Heat victories where they turn it on late and blow out their opponent.

Instead, the exact opposite happened. The Bucks went on an improbable 33-5 run in 10 minutes of game time, getting huge offensive contributions from an unlikely source an Luc Richard Mbah a Moute (19 points) and undervalued shooter in Mike Dunleavy (18 points). After defending against the 3 pretty well all game, the Heat let up four 3-pointers during the big run, and each shot seemed to deflate the Heat balloon a little further.

On the other side of the ball, LeBron James and company couldn’t seem to avoid the shotblocking of Larry Sanders and Mbah a Moute. More often than not, Miami’s possessions resulted in turnovers or turned away layups at the rim, and that was the spark the previously dormant Bucks offense needed to get rolling.

It’s not often you see a team of Miami’s caliber completely collapse in the fourth quarter, but Milwaukee’s defense rendered every player not named Wade or James completely irrelevant on the night. Chris Bosh was flustered by the length and shot-altering abilities of Milwaukee’s long frontline, and took 14 shots only to score 12 points. Mario Chalmers was a complete non-factor offensively, and his attempt to take Jennings’ head off on a fast break was probably the best defense he displayed all night. Jennings poured in 25 points on his usual diet of tough pull-up jumpers and slicing drives to the rack.

Somehow, Miami’s bench was even more ineffective than Bosh and Chalmers, mustering up only 15 combined points, two assists, and no steals — numbers Bucks’ bench ace Mike Dunleavy bested all on his own.

Miami is obviously not your average team, but they’ve been exactly that on the road. Now just 6-6 away from the AmericanAirlines Arena, you have to wonder where the Heat would be sitting if they had, say, the early season schedule the Denver Nuggets had.

It’s probably not time to sound the alarm just yet, though. Beating a tough Milwaukee team on the road on the second night of a back-to-back isn’t the easiest of tasks, but losing in this fashion does show a little bit more vulnerability than we were accustomed to seeing last season. Fact is, Miami is a middle-of-the-road defensive team right now (14th in efficiency) that struggles with deep squads who can shoot from the perimeter. And guess what? The two teams directly below them in the Eastern Conference standings fit that bill pretty darn well.

Miami is obviously the heavy favorite going forward even with some of their defensive issues, but the journey back to the NBA Finals might not be the cakewalk most thought it would be after all.

Kevin Durant gets into Twitter debate with reporter over White House comments

3 Comments

Kevin Durant became the latest Warrior — joining Stephen Curry, Andre Iguodala, and Shaun Livingston, that we know of — to say he would not visit President Donald Trump’s White House as NBA champion. Which is all kind of moot because it’s unlikely the White House invites them and outspoken Trump critic/Warriors coach Steve Kerr and his players any way. (The White House’s biggest concern should be that Kerr accepts the invitation and uses that platform to challenge the president’s policies and style in front of him.)

Durant’s comments led to plenty of talk on sports talk radio and around the sports world online about whether a player or team should decline an invitation from the president. It’s not a new debate, Tom Brady denied that politics is why he didn’t visit Barack Obama’s White House (although I’m not sure many believed him), but KD’s on a big stage now so it became a talking point.

Former ESPN reporter Britt McHenry questioned a player not visiting the White House, and Durant responded, leading to a little Twitter back-and-forth.

Durant had previously Tweeted in response “by doing the opposite, I am inspiring more people” but that Tweet was deleted.

There is no one correct way to protest a person/policy/action, McHenry may see things differently, but Durant has chosen to stay away. That’s valid — traditionally these “champions to the White House” things are tedious photo ops with a few bad jokes thrown in. Having a hoops fan/player in Obama in the White House made the NBA visits more entertaining the past eight years, there was some trash talk, but still, they are largely just a public relations moment. If KD doesn’t want to play the PR game with Trump, that’s a legitimate response.

This has all been a tempest in a teapot. Until/unless the White House actually invites the Warriors to come, it’s all kind of moot.

Dwight Howard on Hornets’ coach Clifford: “It’s a great feeling when somebody believes in you”

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Dwight Howard‘s game is much better than his reputation among fans.

He’s not the Defensive Player of the Year/All-NBA/MVP candidate level player he was back in Orlando, but Howard is still one of the best rebounders in the game, he’s strong defensively, and he’s an efficient scorer inside. He’s a quality center, if he plays within himself and is used well. His perception as a guy who does not take the game seriously and held back Houston and Atlanta in recent years has validity (he plays better in pick-and-roll than on the move, but wants the ball in the post), but the idea he is trash is flat-out wrong. He’s still good.

Howard wants to change his reputation, rewrite the final chapters of his career, and told Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN that Steve Clifford’s Charlotte Hornets are the place that is going to happen.

“The other places I was, the coaches didn’t really know who I am,” Howard told ESPN. “I think that they had perception of me and ran with it. Cliff knows my game. He knows all the things that I can do. I’m very determined to get back to the top. It’s a great feeling when somebody believes in you. They aren’t just saying it; they believe it. It really just pushed me to the limit in workouts: running, training, everything. I want to do more.

“In Orlando, I was getting 13-15 shots a game. Last season, in Atlanta, it was six shot attempts. It looks like I’m not involved in the game. And if I miss a shot, it sticks out because I am not getting very many of them. But I think it’s all opportunity, the system. I haven’t had a system where I can be who I am since I was in Orlando.”

Howard averaged 8.3 field goal attempts per game in Atlanta, which is about five a game below his peak. Last season 75 percent of Howard’s shots came within three feet of the rim — is is not there to space the floor, however, he can still move fairly well off the roll and is a good passer for a big.

Last season, 28 percent of Howard’s possessions came on post ups, and he averaged a pedestrian 0.84 points per possession on those. On the 21 percent of shots he got on a cut, he averaged a very good 1.36 PPP. When he got the ball back as a roll man (again on the move), it was 1.18 PPP. The challenge long has been Howard is better on the move but doesn’t feel involved unless he gets post touches, and if he doesn’t feel involved and engaged he’s not the same player.

Maybe Clifford can make this all work with some older plays where Howard feels comfortable.

Charlotte, with Howard in the paint and on the boards, should get back to being a top 10 NBA defensive team, not the middle of the pack as they were last season. Clifford is better than that as a coach, and Howard is an upgrade in the paint (on both ends). Charlotte should be a playoff team again in the East.

But it all will come back to Howard. Fair or not. And Wojnarowski is right, this is Howard’s last best chance to write the ending he wants to his career.

Friday afternoon fun: Watch James Harden’s 10 best plays from last season

Leave a comment

James Harden had a historic season in Houston.

Since it’s Friday afternoon and your sports viewing options consist of watching guys about to be cut from NFL rosters try to impress, why not check out Harden’s best plays from last season. It’s worth a couple minutes of your time.

Mavericks sign Jeff Withey to one-year contract

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Jeff Withey‘s ex-fiancée accused him of domestic violence, but he was not charged.

That frees him to continue his basketball career, which he’ll do in Dallas.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

The Mavericks could use another center, even if they re-sign Nerlens Noel. Salah Mejri is the only other true center, though Dirk Nowitzki will now play the position.

Withey is a good rim protector. Just don’t ask him to do anything away from the basket.

Dallas annually brings excess players to training camp and has them compete for regular-season roster spots. Whether or not his salary is guaranteed, Withey will likely fall into that competition.