Royce White

Royce White refusing assignment to D-League. Ugh.


For a second time this season, the Houston Rockets have assigned Royce White — the No. 16 overall pick from the last draft — to their D-League team. And for the second time he has refused the assignment.

And from here it’s just hard to see him ever playing a moment for the Rockets.

After a six-week absence from the team as White and the Rockets disagreed over the best course of action to help him play and deal with his anxiety disorder, White had returned to working out at the team facilities this week. Then the Rockets assigned White to the Rio Grande Valley Vipers.

But White is refusing the assignment, tweets Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle. White released a statement which is in full on the Chronicle Web site (this is a portion of it):

I do wish to play, but I only intend to do so with the collaboration and recommendation of trained professionals. The purpose of a doctor’s confirmation is to ensure that health decisions are made in the sole interest of health and not conflicted with business. My only hope is that decision makers involved realize that doctors are the only logical source to decide action.

There is an admitted lack of knowledge on behalf of the Rockets and the NBA, it becomes transparent as they choose to forego the knowledge of trained professionals and make independent decisions for something as complex as mental health without consulting any doctors. The Rockets have told me in recent conversations that it is their right to decline even their own doctors’ recommendations. The concept of not listening to medical consultants in medical situations is alarming. It is also alarming that a player is susceptible to fines for simply adhering to the recommendation of doctors.

It is true that accommodating mental health can be very tough and complex, however, sometimes the only reasonable solution to doing what is right is doing what is tough. To portray that the Rockets have been supportive to me is fundamentally incorrect.

White has said continuously that he has not gotten enough if any support from the Rockets organization to help him be a functioning NBA player. The Rockets have been supportive publicly but have said in multiple reports that they have tried a number of steps to accommodate White but that he has not followed through on his end.

I’m not going to pretend to know what is the appropriate way to deal with White’s disorder (my psych minor only gets me so far). My understanding is that one of the ways to best deal with the anxiety is a regular routine schedule, but that is something nearly impossible to do with the travel and varied games times of an NBA team. There clearly is no easy solution.

But the idea of White getting some burn in the D-League before coming up to the NBA squad makes basketball sense.

And more importantly for White, slamming your employer in public — while not having played a game for them — does not help make your point or case to a broader public. If his goal is to show Rockets fans and everyone else that the Rockets are in the wrong here and are not helping him properly, these kinds of statements (not to mention twitter rants) defeat his own purpose. He loses the battle of perception with these things and that hurts his overall cause.

Really, from here it’s just hard to imagine White and the Rockets ending up on the same page, or at least close enough to that page where he would join the team and play.

In other Rockets news, they are adding to their roster on the perimeter, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports and the NBC Sports Network.


Carmelo Anthony says he can play at high level 4-5 more years

USA Basketball Men's National Team Training Camp

Carmelo Anthony can flat-out score the rock — that has never been the question. Even hurting last season for many of the 40 games he played, he averaged 24.2 points a game, had a true shooting percentage of 53.1 percent (right near the league average) while having the entire weight of the Knicks offense on his shoulders (32.2 usage rate, fifth highest in the NBA). When people (or players) talk about him being overrated, the discussion turns to defense or if he makes his teammates better. But there should be no doubt Anthony is an elite scorer.

He thinks he will be for a while longer — like another five years. Via Ian Begley of ESPN:

In fact, the 31-year-old Knicks star is confident that he can play at a high level for the next “four or five years.”

“Without a doubt. Without a doubt,” Anthony said after the Knicks’ final training camp practice on Saturday.

The Knicks better hope that’s true, they already made that bet with that massive five-year contract they gave him last summer.

Anthony’s age combined with him coming off knee surgery have a lot of people — myself included — expecting him to take a step back. Not a big one, but he is coming up at the point in his career where some open shots he used to get are now contested because he’s half-a-step slower, and some of those looks don’t fall as often. His jumper isn’t suddenly going to look like Rajon Rondo‘s, ‘Melo is going to get his points, but he may not be as efficient.

Fortunately, the Knicks have an improved supporting cast around him this season. That should take some offensive load off his shoulders, and maybe the Knicks offense will see better ball movement and start to resemble the triangle. If it’s just more isolation Anthony, it’s not going to be pretty.

Kings pick up option on G Ben McLemore

Ben McLemore, Rodney Hood
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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) The Sacramento have picked up the 2016-17 option on guard Ben McLemore‘s contract.

General manager Vlade Divac announced the move Saturday.

McLemore was Sacramento’s first-round pick in 2013. He averaged 12.1 points, 2.9 rebounds and 1.7 assists last season.