Golden State Warriors' Ezeli dunks against Los Angeles Lakers in Oakland

New Year’s Resolutions for the NBA


Did you catch the Lakers-Warriors game on Saturday night? It was close to perfect. The crowd in Oakland is always wonderful, but with the hated Lakers in town, they really stepped it up a notch. The on-court play was obviously great. The storylines were there. If you watched, regardless of who you were rooting for, chances are you enjoyed yourself quite a bit.

That doesn’t happen enough. It’s not that the NBA doesn’t provide a quality product, because they do. It could just be better. And that’s what New Year’s Resolutions are for, right? Here’s my list for David Stern and Adam Silver:

Change the overtime timeout rule

For some asinine reason, each team is awarded three timeouts in the five minute overtime period. That just kills any back-and-forth action, making even the best game too drawn out. Basketball thrives on building momentum and constant action, but timeouts just take the wind out of your sails too often.

We’re not even talking about mandatory media timeouts here — just like overtime, these are bonus timeouts. And there are too many of them.

Want to know what really made the Warriors-Lakers game great? There were no stoppages while the action was at its best. Neither the Warriors or the Lakers used a single one of their three timeouts in overtime until there were eight seconds left in the overtime period. It built drama, it built intrigue, and it kept the crowd in it the whole way.

Stop playing music during big moments

This is a thing only a small handful of game operations staff get. Let the game be the show. There is absolutely no reason to be playing a Ke$ha song in a tie game with 15 seconds left while the ball is getting inbounded. Let the applause grow, let the tension build. There are moments where music provides a nice supplement or distraction, but please, let the crowd at least have the chance to get into the game without a Black Eyed Peas song drowning out their thoughts.

Move the photographers back

If I see one more player get hurt because he either tramples a photographer under the baseline or has to try and leap over them, I’m going to lose my mind. These players don’t have pads on. They’re often moving with insane amounts of momentum — can we give them a little more floor area to slow down? I love a good basketball picture, but will it make a huge difference to the photos if we move these guys back, say, five feet? We have the technology! Keep the players safe from getting tripped or faceplanting into a camera and move these guys back, pronto.

Stop counting all shots behind halfcourt as field goal attempts

There’s nothing lamer in basketball. Time is winding a down, a player has a shot at a heave, and he waits to hear the buzzer before he lets the shot go so it won’t hurt his numbers. It happens in just about every game. Don’t blame the players — those long attempts count towards their stats, which is what their salaries are based on.

Let’s change the rule instead. Any shot behind halfcourt is almost certainly a buzzer beating shot, so why count it towards a player’s field goal attempts? If they make it, sure, add it. But if they miss from beyond halfcourt? Just don’t count it. It’s simple — stop punishing players for trying to score in these situations, and we’ll see guys actually try to make shots from unfathomable distances. Isn’t that more fun for everyone?

Hezonja throws down one-handed dunk in preseason debut

Orlando Magic Introduce 2015 NBA Draft Picks
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Mario Hezonja, the No. 5 pick in this year’s draft, has never lacked for confidence. The Croatian guard made his pro debut in the Magic’s preseason game against the Hornets on Saturday and did this:

Between Hezonja, Elfrid Payton, Victor Oladipo and Aaron Gordon, the Magic have a nucleus of young players that has the potential to be a lot of fun. Even if they’re still a few years away from contending, they’re definitely going to be a League Pass favorite this year.

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist suffers dislocated shoulder in preseason game

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Solomon Hill
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Preseason is only just getting underway and there’s already a potentially serious injury to report. In the game between the Hornets and Magic on Saturday night, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist was taken to the locker room after suffering a right shoulder injury. The Hornets announced that he was then taken to an Orlando-area hospital for follow-up x-rays:

A few hours after the game, the Hornets announced that Kidd-Gilchrist has a dislocated shoulder:

Depending on the severity of the injury, he could miss a few weeks or a few months. Hopefully, it’s the shorter end of that timeline. We should know more on Sunday.