Charlotte Bobcats v Phoenix Suns

Losses beginning to wear on Bobcats after dropping 13th straight game in Phoenix

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PHOENIX — Before the Bobcats lost yet again in Phoenix on Wednesday, the team’s head coach, Mike Dunlap, was asked to assess the mood of his club as it was dealing with a losing streak that at the time stood at 12 straight games.

“Hearty,” he said. “Good. Learning, because that’s the way we started. We never thought that we were going to start off and not have a stretch [like this]. Certainly we don’t like this stretch, but there’s a certain attitude with the staff and obviously myself, [which] is that we don’t skip a beat with our habits. Keep your habits right, and your communication fresh with your players. So it’s good.”

It appeared to be the opposite after Charlotte lost its 13th in a row to the Suns, and understandably so.

The Bobcats competed legitimately for only the game’s first 12 minutes, before suffering a second quarter scoring drought that ultimately doomed their chances. Charlotte fell behind by as many as 30 points to the Suns, on the way to a 121-104 loss that wasn’t nearly that close.

The vibe in the Charlotte locker room afterward was a somber one, with few conversations taking place and players, for the most part, sitting individually in silent reflection while searching for answers.

Dunlap understands the situation, that this is a process that’s more about development, and less about wins and losses in the immediate future. The challenge, of course, is conveying that to his players, the majority of which simply aren’t used to losing games like this on a regular basis.

“I think it’s just difficult in general,” Dunlap said, when asked if the streak is more challenging to get through while leading a younger team. “Losing, whether it’s one or a string of them, it does’t feel good if you’re a competitor. Plus, we have guys that have national championship rings [from playing on college]. So the identification is, as you recapitulate that feeling, that this is temporary; it’s not forever. But at the same time, are we getting better? And I think people that are following the trail and have watched us for the entire journey can say yep, that guy’s getting better, and that guy’s getting better. It’s noticeable, but we’re not getting our return, and that’s where the frustration is.”

The Bobcats have competed in at least seven of their 13 straight losses, including most recently against the Lakers on Tuesday, and against the Clippers, Warriors, Knicks, and Hawks — all above average teams.

But after a destructive loss like the one that the team endured at the hands of the Suns, the conviction that what the team is doing is actually working is significantly diminished.

“I think we played well as a group,” Michael Kidd-Gilchrist said afterward. “I mean, the fourth quarter especially, we played really well. I mean, there’s good things in this loss, too. It’s not all bad things that we’ll take away from this loss.”

As for the mood surrounding the team during this losing streak, the words MKG used to express the situation were essentially the polar opposite of what was being conveyed by both his tone and his body language.

“It’s a lot of positives,” he said, fairly unconvincingly. “I think it’s a lot of positives. I’m just taking it day by day.

“We’re just young,” he said. “It’s going to be all good down the road, so I’m not worried about it right now.”

Again, on a scale of 1-10, the believability factor in what Kidd-Gilchrist was saying was hovering around a negative-two.

Kemba Walker, while still clearly dejected over yet another loss, delivered his platitudes with far more conviction.

“We’re fine, man,” he said. “We’re fine. We’re a young team. We still feel pretty confident in ourselves, and it’s still a young season. We still have a lot of time. As long as we’re getting better, we’re definitely all just staying together. Good things are going to happen for us; right now, we’re losing but I think good things will happen for us pretty soon.”

After a game like Wednesday’s in Phoenix, there truly aren’t a lot of positives. The comeback mounted by Charlotte’s reserves came, again, after the team was down by 30 and the Suns had essentially already placed this one in the win column.

Dunlap knows that patience is key to a situation like this, but also knows that there will be some pain along the way as his team develops.

“We’re giving them a lot of time, but unfortunately wisdom comes after some nasty experiences,” he said. “There’s no doubt we’re teething.”

Dunlap is a veteran of the coaching game, despite this being his first chance at being the head man for one of the NBA’s 30 teams. He understands the process better than anyone, but some wins will need to be at least sprinkled among all the losses for the players to truly buy in, and trust the process over the results in order to continue to see real improvement over the course of the long, 82-game season.

NBA VP Kiki VanDeWeghe on “unnaturual acts:” “Our rules are for every player”

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The NBA has tried to crack down on “unnatural acts” — players flailing body parts trying to draw a foul call.

At the heart of that is Golden State’s Draymond Green, who picked up a flagrant foul for the unnatural act of getting his leg high enough to kick James Harden in the face Thursday night. Green fired back at the league, saying in part, “It’s funny how you can tell me how I get hit and how my body is supposed to react. I didn’t know the league office was that smart when it came to body movements.” Green’s argument is that he was fouled in the air and the high leg was the natural act of him trying to keep his balance. (Doesn’t matter, it’s a reckless act and if you kick someone in the face you should get a flagrant foul. Also, try explaining the kick on Marquese Chriss on Saturday that way.)

Former All-Star NBA player as well as coach Kiki VanDeWeghe is now an NBA vice president and the guy who is the decision maker on these reviews and fouls. He spoke with Sam Amick of the USA Today about how those unnatural act rules are applied.

“Our rules are for every player,” VanDeWeghe told USA TODAY Sports. “We want each play judged according to the rules, as best possible, and the rules applied fairly across our whole league. That’s very important to us. We don’t make exceptions for players. They are applied to everybody.

“In Draymond’s particular case (against the Houston Rockets on Thursday), he had an arm flail which struck the player (James Harden) in the neck-head area. And then in addition to that, he had a kick up above the head of the defender. As he brought his leg down, his heel hit him in the face. It wouldn’t matter what player we’re talking about (it’s a foul)….

“Most of these are done to draw the attention of the referees. We noticed an uptick in these last year, and they needed to be addressed by the competition committee.”

While Green feels singled out — “marked” is what he tweeted — VanDeWeghe noted that competition committee included owners, coaches, GMs, people from the players union, and a lot of people with playing experience, who all sat down as a group and studied what is and is not an “unnatural act.” As Amick noted, it isn’t just Green who gets hit with these penalties, although he gets the headlines: Boston’s Marcus Smart was given a Flagrant One for his kick to the groin of the Miami’s Hassan Whiteside; Thursday LeBron James was given a technical foul for his blow to the head of the Clippers’ Alan Anderson.

So long as Green continues to make these acts — and the kick to Chriss Saturday suggests they are not slowing down — the crackdown will continue.

Watch Raptors PG Kyle Lowry throw a full-court alley oop to Pascal Siakam

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Toronto Raptors point guard Kyle Lowry is having an excellent year for the Eastern Conference Finals hopefuls, and part of that is due to his vision. On Saturday, Lowry threw a full-court lob to Pascal Siakam that was mighty impressive.

After a missed shot in the middle of the third quarter by the Atlanta Hawks, Lowry gathered the rebound on the left block and quickly turned his eyes downcourt.

Siakam, the No. 27 overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft, was streaking toward the Raptors basket and behind the Hawks defense.

Lowry took advantage with a long-distance heave after one dribble at the free-throw line, and Pascal was able to gather and softly lay the ball up at the rim.

Warriors F Draymond Green kicks Marquese Chriss in the hand (VIDEO)

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Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green was not punished with an additional fine for kicking Houston Rockets G James Harden in the face on Dec. 1. Perhaps that emboldened him to kick another opponent just two days later in Phoenix Suns rookie Marquese Chriss.

While attempting a rip through move on Chriss in the third quarter of Saturday night’s game, Green could be seen kicking Chriss in the hand.

Chriss, in some obvious pain, immediately ran over to the bench and was replaced by Jared Dudley.

Meanwhile, Green didn’t even draw a foul. On the other end of the floor, P.J. Tucker was trying to fight through a screen and was called for both a personal foul and a technical foul after arguing.

It seems that there’s not much stopping Green from trying to damage opponents. He infamously missed Game 5 of the 2016 NBA Finals due to his extracurricular activity, his absence perhaps acting as the catalyst to swing a series in which the Warriors blew a 3-1 lead to the Cleveland Cavaliers.

There was no fine for kicking the league’s best MVP candidate in Harden, and no reaction from officials for kicking Chriss.

This came just a day after Green complained about how the league was treating him and how he should control his body.

In the last six months, Green has hit or kicked Harden, Chriss, Kyrie Irving, Allen Crabbe, and Steven Adams (twice).

Suns coach Earl Watson cautions support for marijuana use a “slippery slope”

PHOENIX, AZ - OCTOBER 30:  Head coach Earl Watson of the Phoenix Suns reacts during the second half of the NBA game against the Golden State Warriors at Talking Stick Resort Arena on October 30, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  The Warriors defeated the Suns 106 -100. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Warriors’ coach Steve Kerr is a thoughtful, measured adult who made a very rational decision: He was battling debilitating back pain that was keeping him away from the Warriors, so he chose to try marijuana to try to ease that pain. It didn’t work for Kerr, but he advocated for professional sports leagues to have a more open mind toward allowing the drug to be used for pain management.

Suns’ coach Earl Watson is a thoughtful, measured adult who comes from a very different world than Kerr, and that gives him a different perspective. Watson’s story is that of a child who grew up in poverty, surrounded by violence, in Kansas City, and used basketball to pull himself out of that world.

Watson urged caution in NBA coaches endorsing the use of marijuana, speaking to Chris Haynes of ESPN.

“I think our rhetoric on it has to be very careful because you have a lot of kids where I’m from that’s reading this, and they think [marijuana use is] cool,” Watson told ESPN on Saturday after the Suns’ 138-109 loss to the Warriors. “It’s not cool. Where I’m from, you don’t get six fouls to foul out. You get three strikes. One strike leads to another. I’m just being honest with you, so you have to be very careful with your rhetoric…

“I think it would have to come from a physician — not a coach,” Watson said. “And for me, I’ve lived in that other life [of crime and drugs]. I’m from that area, so I’ve seen a lot of guys go through that experience of using it and doing other things with that were both illegal. And a lot of those times, those guys never make it to the NBA, they never make it to college, and somehow it leads to something else, and they never make it past 18.

“So when we really talk about it and we open up that, I call it that slippery slope. We have to be very careful on the rhetoric and how we speak on it and how we express it and explain it to the youth.”

There is no doubt that as a society, the United States is moving toward the legalization of marijuana. More and more states move that way each election, and the generational shift in attitudes toward the drug is an unstoppable trend.

How the NBA (and other professional sports leagues) adjust their rules and procedures in dealing with this will be a topic in the coming years. With that is the issue Watson brings up — the image the NBA projects on the issue. NBA players are free to drink alcohol, but it can’t impact them at work (like just about every other job), but the NBA doesn’t want to be seen as pro-drinking. It will have to find a way to walk that same line with marijuana.