J.R. Smith, Jason Kidd, Carmelo Anthony, Tyson Chandler, Bill Kennedy

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Carmelo has Knicks on top in New York


Welcome to PBT’s roundup of the day in NBA action. Or, what you missed while you were wondering who thought an Angry Birds movie was a good idea…

Cavaliers 100, Lakers 94: It’s not just one thing with the Lakers – their offense was off, their defensive rotations are sloppy, their big men missed shots, but the real culprit was Kyrie Irving. He is back and the Cavs look much better. We broke down the Lakers third straight loss here.

Knicks 100, Nets 97: Brooklyn started out the game on a 21-5 run, playing some of their best interior defense since Brook Lopez went down (which is a weird thing to type). Deron Williams was attacking. Things were clicking and the Nets shot 67 percent in the quarter.

But starting with a 12-2 run in the middle of the second quarter the Knicks owned the rest of the game. Part of that was Carmelo Anthony, who had 14 points in the second quarter, 15 in the fourth when it mattered and a grand total of 45. The Knicks were moving the ball, getting and hitting three point looks — 14-of-28. Andray Blatche had 23 to lead the Nets. It was another fun, close game between these teams. But old man Jason Kidd was the difference when it mattered most. (He missed the free throw on the and-1, but ‘Sheed did not yell “Ball Don’t Lie.”)

Clippers, Bulls: The Bulls did everything by the books. They created 4-on-3 opportunities in the high post for Joakim Noah (6 assists) to pick apart the defense. They got Carlos Boozer open looks along the baseline, where he used his power to overwhelm (24 points) the Clippers frontcourt. And of course, the halfcourt defense was wonderful.

But here’s the thing — the Bulls can do everything right schematically and still lose because the talent just isn’t on par with the league’s elite teams. Marco Belinelli clanked his way to a 6-for-22 shooting performance. Should Belinelli shoot 22 shots ever? Probably not, but these are the types of realities good teams will force the Bulls to face.
—D.J. Foster

Nuggets 101, Pistons 94: The Nuggets led the entire second half, but these are a scrappy Pistons bunch and they made Denver work for it. The real key for the Nuggets was their bench — Corey Brewer had 15 points, JaVale McGee 12 and Andre Miller 11. And the three did it shooting 66.7 percent. Ty Lawson also filled up the stat sheet with 26 points, getting 16 of those in the second half. The Pistons Greg Monroe had 27 points and 10 rebounds.

Wizards 77, Hornets 70: Even Anthony Davis’ return couldn’t save this from being an ugly affair. The Wizards shot 32.9 percent and won (the Hornets were 32.5). Washington scored just 11 points in the first quarter, but that was better than New Orleans 10 in the fourth quarter. Heck, Jordan Crawford outscored the Hornets by himself 14-10 (Crawford finished with 26). Davis had 13 points and 8 rebounds in his return.

Kobe Bryant went from DeMar DeRozan’s idol to his friend

Kobe Bryant, DeMar DeRozan
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TORONTO (AP) — DeMar DeRozan was 16 when he was invited to Kobe Bryant‘s camp for the top 25 American high school shooting guards.

A friendship grew between the youngster who would become an All-Star for the Toronto Raptors and the player who would become the third-leading scorer in NBA history.

DeRozan talked at length Sunday night about Bryant, who announced on The Players’ Tribune that he’ll retire after the season, capping a 20-year NBA career.

“The knowledge that he tended to give me every time I got the chance to be around him, especially at a young age, carrying over to the league, it was definitely an honor,” DeRozan said after the Raptors’ 107-102 loss Sunday night to Phoenix. “I tried to listen as much as possible, soak in as much as I could all of the time. It’s crazy how much time flies.”

Bryant was DeRozan’s favorite player while growing up in Compton, Calif.

“I’ve tried to emulate and learn so much from him ever since I was a kid, watching every single game growing up in Los Angeles, having a chance to get with him and learn from him, from conversations even when I was in high school from playing against him, completing against him, being in big games with him,” said DeRozan, who scored 29 points in Sunday’s loss. “It’s definitely a sad, sad day, but he’s been in the game a long time.”

Bryant’s announcement came just before the Lakers’ game against the visiting Indiana Pacers. Fans at the game received a letter of thanks from the 37-year-old player in a black envelope embossed with gold.

Bryant has struggled mightily with injuries the past several years, and is shooting a career-worst 32 percent this season.

“It don’t matter. That man has five rings, 17 all-stars, MVP,” DeRozan said. “There’s nothing he hasn’t done. It’s just father time catching up with him, injuries catching up with him this past year. People will appreciate it when he’s away from the game.”

DeRozan has his favorite Kobe memory – Bryant scoring 81 points against Toronto in 2006. DeRozan, who would join the Raptors as a rookie three years later, said he felt as if he was playing a video game watching the high-scoring spectacle unfold on TV.

DeRozan is in his seventh season with Toronto. He can’t imagine playing 20 years.

“Especially playing at a high level, doing the things he was doing … people don’t understand how hard that is,” DeRozan said. “Even now, a lot of us find ourselves tired (on) back-to-backs. It’s tough. It’s really tough. To do it 20 years at a high level, you have to give that man every credit in the world.”

Hornets’ Al Jefferson out 2-3 weeks with strained calf

Al Jefferson
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The Hornets have been playing well of late, going 7-3 in their last 10 and outscoring opponents by 6.3 points per 100 possessions. They are solidly in the playoff picture out East, in the six slot right now.

This is not going to help matters.

The team announced that an MRI confirmed center Al Jefferson will be out two to three weeks with a strained left calf muscle, suffered during Charlotte’s 87-82 win over Milwaukee on Sunday.

Jefferson missing a few weeks due to injury at some point during the season is an annual event, like the Rose Parade or the Head of the Charles Regatta — but this year the Hornets are better prepared to deal with it. This is the deepest Charlotte team in recent memory.

Tyler Hansbrough, Cody Zeller, and Frank Kaminsky will get more run — plus Spencer Hawes may be back in the rotation — and if they can step up the Hornets will not slow down much.

This season the Hornets defense has been downright stingy when Jefferson is on the bench, giving up 94.2 points per 100 possessions (which is 10 better than when he is on the court). However, the Hornet offense and rebounding efforts are stronger when he plays.

PBT Extra: How did Thunder, Pacers move up in PBT Power Rankings?

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As they do every Monday during the season, the PBT Power Rankings came out and while the top three remained the same there were some climbers.

Specifically, the Thunder at No. 4 and the Pacers at No. 5.

Why they are there is the latest PBT Extra topic with Jenna Corrado. The simple answer is they are both excellent teams. Russell Westbrook, Kevin Durant, and Paul George are all playing like Top 10 players.

PBT Podcast: We’re back talking Kobe, 76ers, Warriors, Pistons, more

Kobe Bryant
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The ProBasketballTalk NBA podcast is back.

Sure we’re a month into the season, but we’re going to get this podcast rolling again and you can expect us on each Monday and Thursday, with a variety of guests talking everything around the NBA.

Today NBC’s own Dan Feldman joins Kurt Helin to talk Kobe Bryant‘s retirement announcement, and what that means both for the Lakers going forward this season and beyond, but also what that could mean for Byron Scott’s future as the Lakers’ coach.

We also delve into the “showdown” between the Lakers and Sixers on Thursday, talk about the job Brett Brown is doing there as coach (a good one), we talk some Warriors, some Draymond Green, Pistons, Spurs and Pacers to round it all out.

Listen to the podcast below or you can listen and subscribe via iTunes.