Utah Jazz v Los Angeles Lakers

Lakers defensive issues start at the top, lead to 117-110 Jazz win

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The Utah Jazz are not the most talented team in the Western Conference, but they work hard. Every possession, every game.

That is far more than the Lakers, who showed no passion or consistent effort on the defensive end. Starting with their stars and filtering down to everyone.

The result of that sad effort was a 117-110 rare Jazz road win that sinks the Lakers to 9-12 on the season, having lost four of their last five.

Utah scored at a 133.1 points per 100 possession pace in this game — for perspective, the Thunder have the best offense in the NBA this season at 111.3 The Jazz shot 54.2 percent for the game and seemed to consistently get the shot they wanted, either in transition or the half court. Combined the Jazz big men — Al Jefferson, Paul Millsap and Enes Kanter — combined for 52 points on 21-of-37 shooting (56.8 percent).

The defensive issues with the Lakers start at the top, and it’s not just Steve Nash and Pau Gasol still being out. Howard couldn’t stop the Jazz big men and he is becoming more and more frustrated — rightfully — when nobody helps the helper. When the Lakers guards get beat and their man starts to drive Howard steps out to cut off the lane, but nobody rotates to get his man and suddenly it’s easy buckets for opposing bigs.

Kobe Bryant doesn’t get off cleanly here — more than once he didn’t get back on defense really at all after staying to glare and gesture to referees when he didn’t get a call on a drive on the offensive end.

Utah shot 55 percent in the first half but the score was close until midway through the second quarter when the Jazz went on 11-0 run. That separated the teams and gave Utah a 60-51 halftime lead. There were defensive lapses by the Lakers but credit the Jazz who got hustle plays from DeMarre Carroll. The Lakers got hustle from Jordan Hill (17 points and 6 offensive rebounds for the game) but not much else.

Adding insult to injury, the deliberate Jazz had 14 fast break points in the first half, which is tied to the Lakers nine turnovers in the first half.

Lakers came out on a run on the second half and this was back to being a close game immediately. They were doing it with threes — Los Angeles was 15-of-28 from three. The Lakers got 40.9 percent of their points from three. Which is a good sign for a team that has been worried about outside shooting.

All night long Lakers offense was fine, led by Kobe Bryant’s 34 on 9-of-24 shooting.

But that’s moot if you don’t get stops.

The Lakers made it interesting with a late push, actually defending with energy and with a Jordan Hill fastbreak dunk and some Kobe free throws we had a six-point game. But in the end, Utah just keep putting up points and the Lakers clock management at the end was a mess. Mo Williams finished with 22 for Utah, Gordon Hayward had 14 off the bench.

Utah is 12-10 and continues to be a solid team in the West. There are a lot of questions about this team’s moves with a lot of late year contracts as they head into the trading deadline, but they are not playing for tomorrow. They are grinding and working for today.

It’s not too early for the Lakers to get healthy and find a groove, there are more than four months of regular season left. We are just a quarter of the way into the season. But the hole the Lakers have dug themselves will hurt with their playoff seeding and very possible first round series on the road (unless you think they can catch the Thunder, Spurs, Grizzlies or Clippers).

Corey Brewer: “James (Harden) is going to play defense this year”

HOUSTON, TX - MARCH 18:  James Harden #13 of the Houston Rockets walks across the court during their game against the Minnesota Timberwolves at the Toyota Center on March 18, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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James Harden‘s defense is not as bad as its reputation.

Well, at least it wasn’t two seasons ago — his near MVP season he was in good enough shape that he could put in a respectable effort on that end and still handle his massive offensive load. There were still some mental lapses, but his focus was better and his improvement lifted the team defense. Last season, he regressed back to youtube “highlight” defense Harden — his conditioning was not where it needed to be, he didn’t expend as much effort on that end, and it showed.

Harden got a massive contract extension this summer, and Dwight Howard is Atlanta’s problem — now Harden has to lead the Rockets. By example. Corey Brewer told ESPN you’re going to see that on defense.

“I think this year he’s going to play better defense, We’re going to let the past be in the past. It’s the future of the Rockets, man. James is going to play defense this year.”

We’re all Missourians on this one: Show me.

Remember that the Rockets will be out and running — Mike D’Antoni is the coach now, and Daryl Morey is going to get the up tempo ball he wants (which Kevin McHale had them doing, but Harden didn’t like him so…). D’Antoni’s teams in Phoenix played better defense than their reputation — points per possession they were middle of the pack — but that has never been his focus.

Will Harden be able to run like he needs to on offense and still defend at a reasonable level?

If he can, it’s a big step toward the Rockets being a dangerous team in the West because if he does it others will follow. Otherwise, every Rockets game will be a shootout, which is entertaining but not going to get a team deep into the playoffs.

 

Watch Drake hit a half court shot while doing a situp

TORONTO, ON - APRIL 26:  Singer Drake celebrates after Terrance Ross #31 of the Toronto Raptors sinks a 3-pointer in the second half of Game Five of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals against the Indiana Pacers during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Air Canada Centre on April 26, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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I can see the questions on Twitter/in the comments already so let me save you some time.

Because it’s summer.

Because it’s Drake (he’s a celebrity and an NBA hanger-on with some quasi-official position with the Raptors).

Because Stephen Curry did it, too.

Because what other hoops are you watching on a late August afternoon?

And besides, you clicked on it. You know you want to see it.

So here it is, Drake, hitting a halfcourt shot while doing a sit up. Enjoy.

FOR THE KIA!!!!! @highlighthub @bleacherreport

A video posted by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

Mario Chalmers says he’s cleared to play

Memphis Grizzlies guard Mario Chalmers moves the ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2015, in Washington. Chalmers was ejected in the first half. The Wizards won 100-91. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
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Mario Chalmers was thriving with the Grizzlies after a midseason trade from the Heat when a torn Achilles ended his season.

Not the way Chalmers wanted to enter free agency.

Still unsigned, he says he’s progressing.

Chalmers:

Can he go 100%, though? If not, when?

A few teams could use another point guard. If Chalmers shows his health, he belongs in someone’s rotation. But that might require taking a low-paying deal and working his way up from the third point guard spot – or even just onto the regular-season roster.

Report: John Wall ‘rankled’ by James Harden’s high-paying Rockets contract

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 29: John Wall #2 of the Washington Wizards is defended by James Harden #13 of the Houston Rockets in the second half at Verizon Center on March 29, 2015 in Washington, DC. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
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Bradley Beal isn’t the only player bothering John Wall.

James Harden – who’s earning a lot of money from the Rockets and adidas – is drawing the ire of the Wizards point guard.

Kevin O’Connor of The Ringer:

One league source familiar with Wall’s state of mind simply put it this way: “Wall’s got jealousy issues. He’s always upset with someone who makes more money than him.”

A front office executive tells The Ringer that Wall was “rankled” after Harden signed a four-year, $118 million extension with the Rockets.

O’Connor also pointed out this line from Nick DePaula of Yahoo Sports on Wall rejected adidas’ offer:

“He wanted Harden money,” a source told The Vertical.

I wonder how Wall feels about Beal’s max contract, which pays much more than Wall’s deal. Wall didn’t like Reggie Jackson, another lesser player, earning the same amount as him.

The union rejecting cap smoothing in light of the new national TV contracts has certainly adversely affected Wall, who locked in long-term just before the salary cap explosion became known. As other players sign huge contracts, he’s stuck on his old-money deal.

Washington could’ve renegotiated and extended Wall’s contract, but it would have been more complicated than Harden’s arrangement. Wall has three years remaining to what was previously two for Harden. How much extra money would the Wizards have paid Wall over the next three years just to get him committed for one more year? Instead, they signed Ian Mahinmi, Andrew Nicholson and Jason Smith.

I’m also unsure Wall would’ve accepted an extension. He doesn’t seem overly happy in Washington, and a raise via renegotiation was coming only if Wall provided something in return – an additional year of team control added to his contract.

And don’t lose track of this: Harden is better than Wall.

I don’t mind Wall monitoring other players’ contracts. That jealousy or whatever you want to call it has driven Wall to become a star NBA player. Whatever motivation works.

But demanding Harden’s deal is unrealistic. The Wizards also ought to be mindful of how Beal’s new contract affects chemistry, but that’s their problem.

Wall’s issue – as a player, not endorser – is primarily theoretical. He’s tied to his current contract, and lesser players will earn more than him due simply to timing. He must find a way to make peace with that.