Tyson Chandler and the acceptance of limitations

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New York Knicks center Tyson Chandler is talented, but he’s also ridiculously limited in terms of what he can actually do on a basketball court.

Chandler is a true 7-footer with a strong build, but he possesses no post game whatsoever. There are no jump hooks, no drop steps, no up-and-under moves — nothing. In 17 games this season, according to Synergy Sports, he has attempted one field goal in a post up situation. One. And there was five seconds left on the shot clock, so it was almost like he was forced into shooting it. He made it, in case you were curious.

Here’s my point. Do you know how many jumpers Tyson Chandler attempted in 2011 from 10-15 feet? Zero. Go ahead, try to picture Chandler’s jumper in your head. You can’t do it. Does he even jump? What’s his form look like? Think about how strange that is — Chandler has been in the league 11 years, and when you try to remember a single image of him taking a jumper, you can’t.

What’s even more odd? Chandler, the same guy who can’t shoot and can’t score on the block, is one of the most efficient scorers in NBA history. How is this possible?

True Shooting Percentage is a weighted efficiency stat that adjusts for 3-pointers and free throws, and in 2011, Chandler beat out every NBA player ever and posted the highest number in history with a 70.8 percent mark. Last year’s campaign was truly the most impressive exercise of scoring efficiency ever.

Until this year, that is. Through 17 games, Chandler’s True Shooting Percentage has somehow jumped up to 75.3 percent — an astronomical number that no player has ever approaches. It’s even more impressive that he’s actually scoring more than he ever has with 15.1 points per 36 minutes. When the attempts go up, the efficiency usually goes down. But not with Chandler.

How can a relatively unskilled basketball player be so good offensively? It’s a decision. Chandler works his tail off, of course, but his offensive prowess has more to do with his conscious effort to only do a certain number of things on the court and not dabble in much else. Roll to the rim. Hit the offensive glass. Seal off a defender. Chandler never steps outside these seemingly menial tasks, but he’s perfected the arts others take for granted. Chandler is completely aware of his immense limitations, and he’s accepted them.

That acceptance of limitations is a skill in its own right — one that few players actually possess. To be in the NBA, an absurd amount of confidence is almost requisite. There’s no room for hesitation or doubt or believing you can’t do something. It’s why Jordan Crawford thinks he can be the next Michael Jordan. It’s why Raymond Felton thinks he can drop 50 at anytime even though he’s never, ya know, actually done it. Self-delusion is necessary for survival in the most competitive basketball league in the world.

And really, Chandler’s ability to stray away from that path and develop at his own rate and be realistic with himself is what makes him the incredible player he is. He’s the perfect teammate — he doesn’t need the ball, he covers your back defensively, and he never mails it in from an effort standpoint. He’s a rock. On a Knicks team filled with guys brimming with confidence, always pushing the limits as to what they can do on the court, Chandler is a grounding influence. While Jason Kidd threads the impossible needle, or Carmelo Anthony takes a 24-foot feat check, or J.R. Smith does J.R. Smith things, Chandler is always there, doing the same things he always does, silently getting better and better.

It makes sense that Chandler is highly regarded for the defensive miracles  he’s performed (the Knicks were a top 5 team in defensive efficiency last year), but he’s also an offensive force who very rarely makes mistakes. He never takes a bad shot, he only turns the ball over once a game, and he grabs about four offensive rebounds per contest. Basically, Chandler creates extra possessions for his team by the handful, and never throws away the ones the Knicks already have.

You see, Chandler is much more than just the Knicks’ defensive anchor. He’s their most efficient scorer. He’s their heart and soul. And for a franchise that’s lacked one over the years, he’s their conscience.

Charles Barkley on new schedule: “These poor babies can’t play back-to-back games”

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Training camp hasn’t even opened yet, but Charles Barkley is already in midseason “get off my lawn” form.

Barkley — the man who can’t stand jump shooting teams, or analytics, or LeBron James asking for better players, or your newfangled technology — went off on another tedious rant at an SMU event Wednesday, this time about the NBA’s decision to start the season a little earlier and have fewer back-to-backs and eliminate four-games-in-five-nights.

Ugh. Like a lot of former players — and a lot of non-athletes, for that matter — Barkley is convinced his peak as a player coincided with the greatest era of basketball ever. Things were never better than the way they did it in his day.

Which means facts — like pointing to the studies that show players both are less likely to be injured and play better and more efficiently when rested — don’t matter. Barkley did it, so players now should have to do it. Who cares if all these packed in games can shorten their careers?

Then again, maybe a few days off would have helped Barkley in the second half of his career.

B.J. Armstrong, former Jordan-era Bull turned agent, told me last year that if teams and players knew in his day what they know now about rest and injury, you would have seen stars like MJ rest. Over time we learn more information, and the smart people and organizations adjust.

Barkley will make far more headlines over the course of the season, he gets paid to be brash, say whatever pops into head, and be generally draw attention to himself. It makes him entertaining, and that’s what Inside the NBA is about. But I will defer to Steve Kerr’s comments from last playoffs on all these old “get off my lawn” players.

“The game gets worse as time goes on. Players are less talented than they used to be. The guys in the 50s would’ve destroyed everybody. It’s weird how human evolution goes in reverse in sports. Players get weaker, smaller, less skilled. I don’t know. I can’t explain it.”

For a couple grand, Warriors fans can have Larry O’Brien Trophy visit their suite

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There’s so much money floating around the Bay Area right now thanks to another tech boom, this price almost seems low.

If you have a suite for the Golden State Warriors home games this season — and those are pretty much sold out, the Warriors draw big from the Silicon Valley crowd — you can have the NBA championship Larry O’Brien Trophy visit your suite. All for just a couple grand. From Gilbert Lee, via ESPN’s Darren Rovell.

The best part is it includes champagne… do you get to spray each other with it as you hold up the trophy? Now that would be perfect (goggles included, of course).

Have an issue with this? Why? To the victor goes the spoils. The Warriors may be able to sell this package for years.

Sixers new “Spirit of 76” court is fire

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First, the Sixers nailed the Nike “statement” jersey.

Now, they have announced a new “Spirit of 76” promotion, with seven tribute nights this season honoring the history of the franchise and of the Philadelphia area (and there is plenty of history to honor).

The best part — the “Spirit of 76” court with the bell logo.

Here is the promo vid

I just hope the Sixers team can live up to all the hype.

Wizards’ Markieff Morris to have sports hernia surgery, miss start of camp

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When the Washington Wizards open training camp next Tuesday, starting forward Markieff Morris will not be on the court.

That’s because he will have surgery to repair a sports hernia, a story broken by Candice Buckner of the Washington Post and since confirmed by Chase Hughes at CSNMidAtlantic.com.

While we don’t have details on the surgery, often recovery time for this is just a few weeks, and Morris could well be ready for the start of the season.

Morris averaged 14 points and 6.5 rebounds a game last season, and the Wizards offense was 5.7 points per 100 possessions better when he was on the court last season. With him out, coach Scott Brooks can lean on Jason Smith or Mike Scott for traditional lineups, but don’t be shocked if he tries a little small ball with Otto Porter and/or Kelly Oubre at the three or four.

Morris also is in the midst of a felony assault trial in Arizona (one where he does not need to attend).