Tyson Chandler and the acceptance of limitations

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New York Knicks center Tyson Chandler is talented, but he’s also ridiculously limited in terms of what he can actually do on a basketball court.

Chandler is a true 7-footer with a strong build, but he possesses no post game whatsoever. There are no jump hooks, no drop steps, no up-and-under moves — nothing. In 17 games this season, according to Synergy Sports, he has attempted one field goal in a post up situation. One. And there was five seconds left on the shot clock, so it was almost like he was forced into shooting it. He made it, in case you were curious.

Here’s my point. Do you know how many jumpers Tyson Chandler attempted in 2011 from 10-15 feet? Zero. Go ahead, try to picture Chandler’s jumper in your head. You can’t do it. Does he even jump? What’s his form look like? Think about how strange that is — Chandler has been in the league 11 years, and when you try to remember a single image of him taking a jumper, you can’t.

What’s even more odd? Chandler, the same guy who can’t shoot and can’t score on the block, is one of the most efficient scorers in NBA history. How is this possible?

True Shooting Percentage is a weighted efficiency stat that adjusts for 3-pointers and free throws, and in 2011, Chandler beat out every NBA player ever and posted the highest number in history with a 70.8 percent mark. Last year’s campaign was truly the most impressive exercise of scoring efficiency ever.

Until this year, that is. Through 17 games, Chandler’s True Shooting Percentage has somehow jumped up to 75.3 percent — an astronomical number that no player has ever approaches. It’s even more impressive that he’s actually scoring more than he ever has with 15.1 points per 36 minutes. When the attempts go up, the efficiency usually goes down. But not with Chandler.

How can a relatively unskilled basketball player be so good offensively? It’s a decision. Chandler works his tail off, of course, but his offensive prowess has more to do with his conscious effort to only do a certain number of things on the court and not dabble in much else. Roll to the rim. Hit the offensive glass. Seal off a defender. Chandler never steps outside these seemingly menial tasks, but he’s perfected the arts others take for granted. Chandler is completely aware of his immense limitations, and he’s accepted them.

That acceptance of limitations is a skill in its own right — one that few players actually possess. To be in the NBA, an absurd amount of confidence is almost requisite. There’s no room for hesitation or doubt or believing you can’t do something. It’s why Jordan Crawford thinks he can be the next Michael Jordan. It’s why Raymond Felton thinks he can drop 50 at anytime even though he’s never, ya know, actually done it. Self-delusion is necessary for survival in the most competitive basketball league in the world.

And really, Chandler’s ability to stray away from that path and develop at his own rate and be realistic with himself is what makes him the incredible player he is. He’s the perfect teammate — he doesn’t need the ball, he covers your back defensively, and he never mails it in from an effort standpoint. He’s a rock. On a Knicks team filled with guys brimming with confidence, always pushing the limits as to what they can do on the court, Chandler is a grounding influence. While Jason Kidd threads the impossible needle, or Carmelo Anthony takes a 24-foot feat check, or J.R. Smith does J.R. Smith things, Chandler is always there, doing the same things he always does, silently getting better and better.

It makes sense that Chandler is highly regarded for the defensive miracles  he’s performed (the Knicks were a top 5 team in defensive efficiency last year), but he’s also an offensive force who very rarely makes mistakes. He never takes a bad shot, he only turns the ball over once a game, and he grabs about four offensive rebounds per contest. Basically, Chandler creates extra possessions for his team by the handful, and never throws away the ones the Knicks already have.

You see, Chandler is much more than just the Knicks’ defensive anchor. He’s their most efficient scorer. He’s their heart and soul. And for a franchise that’s lacked one over the years, he’s their conscience.

Jazz make it official: Thabo Sefolosha to have knee surgery, done for season

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This report had been out there for a few days, but on Tuesday the Utah Jazz made it official:

Swingman Thabo Sefolosha is going to have knee surgery. From the official release:

After further evaluation, Sefolosha (6-7, 220, Switzerland) has elected to undergo right knee surgery to repair an avulsion of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) which he suffered against Charlotte on Jan. 12. 

While the team would not put a timeline on this, he is done for this season.

Which is a blow to a Utah team that has battled injuries all season, most notably a couple of knee injuries to center Rudy Gobert. Sefolosha has been solid for the Jazz this season, averaging 8.2 points per game primarily off the bench, shooting 38 percent from three and playing solid defense in 21 minutes a night.

Joe Johnson will get more run, but this does not help the slim hopes of the Jazz to climb back into the playoff race.

Raptors’ DeMar DeRozan fined $15,000 for criticizing referees

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The Raptors lost to the Warriors on Saturday, and DeMar DeRozan – despite his own brilliant performance – was irked.

The Toronto guard seemed particularly upset about a review of an out-of-bounds call in the final seconds. After initially giving the ball to the Raptors, officials said it touched DeRozan while he was out of bounds and granted Golden State possession:

The NBA’s replay guidelines say (emphasis mine): “Referees can only initiate a review on a called out-of-bounds play (for example, not one where an out-of-bounds might have occurred) and only those involving doubt as to which player caused the ball to go out (not those, for example, where a player stepped on the line).”

DeRozan

I mean, it’s frustrating being out there feeling like you playing 5-on-8. It’s just what it feel like, period. Some of them calls was terrible, period.

I thought you couldn’t even do that. I’m not even a referee, and I know that rule. So, somebody correct me if I’m wrong.

The NBA corrected him in the two-minute report, saying “After communicating with the Replay Center, the ruling on the floor of Raptors possession is overturned and the Warriors are awarded possession because the ball touches DeRozan’s (TOR) leg while his body is out of bounds before Curry (GSW) knocks the ball out. Referees were able to review two aspects of this out-of-bounds play since they were part of the same sequence.”

Then, the league fined him.

NBA release:

Toronto Raptors guard DeMar DeRozan has been fined $15,000 for public criticism of the officiating, it was announced today by Kiki VanDeWeghe, Executive Vice President, Basketball Operations.

The comments were made following the Raptors’ 127-125 loss to the Golden State Warriors on Saturday, Jan. 13

Saying “5-on-8” seems to be a secret code word for getting fined. I’m not sure whether the rest of DeRozan’s comments would have gotten him fined, but that phrase almost certainly did him in.

Kyle Lowry on plan to meet Ben Simmons after ejections: ‘Put it this way, I was back there’

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As Kyle Lowry and Ben Simmons were ejected late in the 76ers’ win over the Raptors yesterday, the players appeared to challenge each other to meet in back.

Lowry eagerly left the court and headed through the tunnel. Simmons appeared much more reluctant at that point.

Despite a report of a confrontation in the hallway, Simmons said nothing escalated, as he went to his locker room.

Michael Grange of Sportsnet

TKO.

Warriors complained of no hot water in showers in Cleveland

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The Cavaliers are clearly frustrated.

Did someone in Cleveland take out that frustration on the Warriors after they beat the Cavs last night?

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

Players were complaining about there being no hot water in the visiting locker room showers. When they walked in, they could be heard screaming in discomfort. Most of the players emerged shivering from taking a quick wash-off.

“Man, they got to do something in ‘The Q.’ Somebody call Bron!” Kevin Durant yelled, referring to LeBron James.

No one seemed angry; the situation was more humorous.

That’s the right approach. Whenever the hot water is out in a visiting locker room, the finger is pointed at the home team for sabotage. Sometimes, heating systems just fail.