Baseline to Baseline recaps: Thunder put up a lot of points on Nets “defense”

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Welcome to PBT’s roundup of the day in NBA action. Or, what you missed while making sure our nation was prepared for a zombie apocalypse….

Wizards 105, Heat 101: Now do you think there might be a problem with the Heat defense? Giving up triple digits to the worst offense in the land? We broke it down in more detail here.

Rockets 107, Lakers 105: The Lakers gave up 34 points in the fourth quarter and lost. Which is better than the 40 points they gave up in the fourth in a loss Sunday. See a pattern here? We talk about the Lakers woes and the Rockets resiliency in another story.

Thunder 117, Brooklyn 111: For the past couple weeks the Nets have been playing pretty good defense. Not so much in this game with Brook Lopez sitting — neither team played much of it but the Nets were worse and against a high-powered offense (OKC had an offensive rating of 125.9 points per 100 possessions, which is 15 points better than their already second best in the NBA average). The Thunder shot 65.7 percent for the first half and 60 percent for the game.

This game was close late because the Nets made a third-quarter comeback going small with Gerald Wallace at the four (and Scott Brooks was too slow to adjust).

The key play of the game came with 1:52 left and the Thunder up two. Kevin Durant (he finished with 34 points) drove hard to his right and went off the glass for the layup — but just as he as did Kris Humphries came flying in for the amazing block. Except it was ruled goaltending. Looking at the replay the referees couldn’t overturn it, I would say he hit the ball simultaneous with it hitting the backboard. The result was a 110-104 lead and he Thunder went on to win.

Russell Westbrook had 25 for the Thunder. Deron Williams had 33 points on 20 shots and seemed to break out of his shooting slump. Which would be good news for the Nets

Timberwolves 105, Sixers 88: Minnesota put up 65 first half points while shooting 59.5 percent (and that was despite Kevin Loves still being cold and shooting 2-of-7 in the first 24). That shooting dropped all the way off to 53.2 percent for the game but that was still impressive against the Philly defense (which kind of took the night off). Seven Timberwolves in double figures, including Josh Howard with 16 points and Alexy Shved with 17. This was the one game of the night that never was really in doubt.

Pacers 80, Bulls 76: This wasn’t a pretty game — both teams shot under 40 percent (Indiana shot 36.3 percent, Chicago 38.4 percent) and the Bulls had 19 turnovers on top of it. The Pacers had two things that got them the win. One was Paul George who had 35 points and was the best player on the floor. The other was a key no-call: The Pacers were up two with :06 left when Loul Deng cut along the baseline, got a pass from Joakim Noah, then as Deng shot he ran into Roy Hibbert — there was a lot of contact but no call. It was a Hibbert block and a Pacers win.

Grizzlies 108, Suns 98 (OT): Zach Randolph got the Grizzlies this win — he had 10 points in the fourth quarter to get the game to overtime then had six points and five rebounds n the extra frame. Randolph finished with 38 points on and 22 rebounds. He was in beast mode. He looked like the playoff Randolph of two seasons ago.

The Suns led most of the way in this one but the Grizzlies were within striking distance and took the lead with 1:10 left. Then the Suns took it back and it took a Rudy Gay jumper with 15 seconds left to force overtime. Then overtime started with a Mike Conley three and a healthy dose of Randolph and it was over. Goran Dragic had 19 to lead a Suns team that wen 1-5 on a six-game road trip.

Malik Monk: I thought Knicks would draft me

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Malik Monk to the Knicks was predicted and reported as a possibility. And when the No. 8 pick came up, the Kentucky guard was still on the board.

But New York – then still run by Phil Jackson – passed on Monk to draft Frank Ntilikina.

Monk, who wound up being drafted No. 11 by the Hornets, via Stefan Bondy of the New York Daily News:

“Me, my agent, everybody in my agency, my family — we thought we were going to New York,” Monk told the Daily News last week after a posing for his Panini trading card. “It was here, my agent is here (based in New York), a great agent, everybody thought it was going to be here. Went to dinner with (Jackson), had a great workout, everything was positive.”

Naiveté and/or wishful thinking by someone who had never been through the draft process before? Perhaps.

But Monk’s agent, Jeff Schwartz, is quite experienced.

What did the Knicks do to make the Monk camp believe they’d draft him? Misleading in those situations can grate agents, though if Jackson did that, at least New York eradicated the problem.

Report: Kyrie Irving and LeBron James didn’t meet in Miami

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Another day, another disputed rumor involving LeBron James.

This time it’s one about him meeting with Kyrie Irving in Miami.

Stephen A. Smith on ESPN:

I just got off the phone with folks about an hour ago. They said LeBron James and Kyrie Irving never met at all. They were both in the city of Miami. But, I was told, it is quite possible to be in the same city and not see each other. They never met. They never talked.

Whether or not they’ve already met, Irving and LeBron might need to address their problems soon

The Cavaliers might not have their high asking price for Irving met before the season, and Cavs owner Dan Gilbert already discussed the possibility of Irving returning. LeBron and Irving might have to reconcile a future as teammates.

Malcolm Brogdon: Charlottesville was white supremacism and terrorism

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Rookie of the Year and Bucks guard Malcolm Brogdon – who played four years at the University of Virginia, which became the epicenter of white-nationalist protests – was asked about the events in Charlottesville and his thoughts on the statue of Robert E. Lee.

Brogdon, via Sports Illustrated:

It was pretty shocking. To see this happen at a place that I call home is sort of jarring for me.

But, if I were to be honest, the level of hate and blatant racism that still dominates the minds of so many Americans today, it’s not shocking to me. I think at the end of the day, you have to call it what it is. I think this is white supremacy, and I think it’s domestic terrorism. I think we live in a country where we go overseas, and we fight other people’s wars, and we fight terrorism overseas internationally. But we don’t want to fully acknowledge the terrorism that goes home domestically.

So, I think it’s a shocking event. But it’s not surprising sort of the hate that is still around.

My thoughts about it have never changed. I’m a person that thinks things should not be glorified that did not do the country any justice. For example, these statues stand still, but all they do is divide people. At this point in time, I think that America needs to be unified. And the statues are clearly something that’s not unifying people. It’s going to continue to create a divide within our communities. And I think they have no place in our society right now.

Kudos to Brogdon for calling spades spades.

Racism is still a problem – not one we’re comfortable discussing, which only exacerbates the problem. It must be acknowledged to be solved.

“Terrorism” is too often a term we reserve for only crimes committed by Muslims. A white supremacist driving his car into a group of counter-protestors – killing one – is almost certainly designed to terrorize them.

But I disagree with Brogdon that the statue should be removed because it’s divisive. It should be removed because it glorifies someone who led a war against the United States to protect the racist institution of slavery.

Unity is nice, but unifying around what? Brogdon might find that the people who agree with his call for unity have a different vision than he does.

Jazz mitigate loss of Gordon Hayward well, but that’s still a devastating departure

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

The Jazz traded up to draft a player who is already exceeding expectations.

But they lost Gordon Hayward.

The Jazz made a savvy trade to land a starter before free agency even began.

But they lost Gordon Hayward.

The Jazz executed several nice value signings.

But they lost Gordon Hayward.

In what was otherwise a smart offseason, there’s just no way around Utah losing Hayward – a 27-year-old star at the critical wing position. Hayward’s importance to the Jazz is self-evident in the effort to re-sign him – a max offer, a billboard, multiple players flying to San Diego for a final meeting. His departure to the Celtics derails what had been a promising ascension.

Two years ago, the Jazz were the only team with four 25-and-under players – Hayward, Rudy Gobert, Derrick Favors and Rodney Hood – who posted at least six win shares.

Last year, the Jazz were the only team a pair of 26-and-under players – Hayward and Gobert – who posted at least 10 win shares.

Though Favors’ and Hood’s progress was sidetracked by injury, Utah still made another step forward with Hayward and Gobert becoming All-Star caliber. If Favors and Hood got healthy, they could have joined Hayward and Gobert – and Donovan Mitchel (who was drafted No. 13 this year then impressed in summer league) and Ricky Rubio (who was acquired for just a likely low first-round pick thanks to the Jazz’s excess cap space to close the 2016-17 fiscal year) – in a core that was growing into a legitimate Western Conference power.

Alas, Hayward bolted for Boston, which threatens even more in the Eastern Conference.

The Jazz rebounded as well as can be expected. They preemptively got Rubio for just a lottery-protected Thunder pick, allowing them not to re-sign George Hill and deal with the 31-year-olds frequent injury troubles. Mitchell has quickly drawn rave reviews. Thabo Sefolosha ($5.25 million), Jonas Jerebko ($4 million) and Ekpe Udoh ($3.2 million) are all on favorable salaries – and each have unguaranteed seasons tacked on for next year, making their deals even more team-friendly.

Those players could join a deep rotation that already includes Gobert, Favors, Hood, Joe Ingles, Joe Johnson and Dante Exum. And here’s a little secret: Gobert – not Hayward, the team’s lone All-Star – was Utah’s best player last year. The Jazz aren’t falling off the map just yet.

Their defense might be even better. They could win even more than the 51 games they won last year if healthier.

But their offense will suffer without Hayward’s creation (which could hurt their defensive rating, if they’re defending after makes less often), and their ceiling is far lower. Guaranteeing Ingles $50 million during his 30s is probably an overpay that will also limit flexibility, though at least his salary declines annually.

The Jazz did a good job of handling losing a star. But losing a star isn’t good, and I’m grading results.

Offseason grade: D+