Alonzo Mourning misses old school, physical NBA. But hey, it’s marketing.

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It was a different NBA in a lot of ways when Alonzo Mourning suited up. It was a more physical game — you could put a hand on a guy out on the perimeter or body him up inside in a way that draws a whistle now.

That physical play led to emotional outbursts — the kind of thing that draws a quick technical now. That physical play led to some fights, too.

The NBA has cracked down on all of it. Mourning gets why, too. It’s marketing. The NBA is a business, firsts and foremost. Don’t ever forget it.

But Zo — speaking to PBT while promoting the Lincoln car brand, a car his grandfather used to drive — admits he misses the old NBA.

“Image is everything,” Mourning told ProBasketballTalk. “The great thing about this league is we have some great leadership in David Stern and he has expanded the brand, especially globally. Part of that is how we the players conduct ourselves on the court.

“But I’m not a fan of the quicker technicals, they seem to get a bit nit-picky about that. I’m old school, it was more physical, it was emotional, but it was an entertaining brand of basketball. People enjoyed it.

“But the game is in a great place, so they must be doing something right…. I don’ think it’s going t change unless a lot of owners and coaches really push for a change.”

Zo is right. So long as the dollars are flowing the rules that keep players in check on complaining are not going anywhere. Fair or not.

And that’s not the only thing that has changed in the game. When Mourning took the court he battled Patrick Ewing, Shaquille O’Neal and a number of other more traditional big centers. Now even Mourning’s Miami Heat — where he is the Vice President of Player Programs and Development — has gone small, with Chris Bosh at the five.

There’s still a place for the traditional big man in the game but what you see now is a reaction to the players that are coming into the league.

“There is still a place for a center in the game,” Mourning said. “If a great center came out right now he would go No. 1 because there are not many out there. They are dinosaurs….

“When you think about it you play from the inside out. The game has changed because the players are more versatile, you have guys like Kevin Durant and Dirk Nowizki and the list goes on and on, they would have been forced to play in the post (in decades past days). The game changed because the players changed. But you still play the game from the inside out. The teams that have won are teams that dominated the paint area in terms of scoring, rebounding, defense and not letting the other teams get their points there. You still have to play inside out.”

Zo adds the Heat did that when they won a title last year, just not in a conventional way — they put LeBron in the post, they had Dwyane Wade slashing into the paint, but they still got their points there. They still won their title inside, not at the arc (the open threes only happen because the defense has to collapse and protect the paint.

Mourning was the No. 2 overall pick out of Georgetown and played 15 NBA seasons. He was a seven-time All-Star, a two-time defensive player of the year and won a ring with the Heat in 2006. But in a lot of ways his career was divided in two parts — before and after he had kidney replacement surgery.

He says he had to adjust and adapt, which is why he started working with Lincoln, a brand trying to reinvent itself. He is driving a 2013 Lincoln MKZ — which he notes has enough headroom for him, no easy feat — and sees the car as the brand turning the corner.

One other thing that seemed to turn the corner in recent games is the Miami Heat defense. Zo still has some street cred with the players and when asked will offer advice and tips to players. And he says that while the Heat have the best record in the East they are just finding their stride.

“It’s early, it’s less than 20 games played, you don’t win championships until June,” Mourning said. “There’s a lot of posturing going on right now, but (the Heat) already have an identity. They are fast paced, they attack the basket and they have a lot of shooters…

“We’re already tough to beat. Once all that clicks, once our defense clicks, we’ll be even tougher to beat.”

Toughness. That is something Mourning knows when he sees it.

LaVar Ball calls out John Wall, Wizards; Marcin Gortat doesn’t think that was smart

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“I told him after the game, due to all the riffraff his dad brings he’s going to get a lot of people coming at him. He’s got to be ready for that, and I let him know after the game… (I had to) welcome his little young a** to the NBA.”

That was the Clippers’ Patrick Beverley after he tormented Lonzo Ball on opening night, and he speaks for a number of other players I have heard from who said father LaVar wrote checks that Lonzo is going to have to cash, and guys were going to go at him. Not every night, but enough.

Since that rough opener the rookie has had a decent couple of games — averaging 18.5 points, 11 assists, and eight rebounds a night, not efficient but playing better — going against Eric Bledsoe (a capable defender who had checked out mentally in Phoenix) and Jrue Holiday and the Pelicans. Wednesday night John Wall and the Wizards come to town, and that’s another level of competition.

My least favorite thing about this Lakers season is the way the L.A. media sticks a microphone in front of LaVar Ball after every game. I don’t care about LaVar, in the same way I don’t care about the Kardashians.

But what he said has become a thing. After the Lakers loss to the Pelicans LaVar said, “[The Wizards] better beware cause Lonzo ain’t losing again. Not in the same week!”

Wizards’ center Marcin Gortat thought that was funny.

First off, Lonzo is going to lose twice in a week a lot this season — the Lakers are not a good team.

Second, Wall is a top-five NBA point guard by any standard, an All-NBA player who is far more than just quick (although he is that, too). He can shoot, he’s an aggressive defender, and he knows how to set up teammates. He’s going to be more than a handful for Ball. To put it kindly.

Whatever happens Wednesday night (most likely Wall smokes Lonzo) we know one thing for sure: LaVar will say something outlandish. And it will become a thing. The game is secondary for that marketing effort.

Lakers to break out powder blue Minneapolis throwback uniforms this season

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The Lakers have gone a few different directions with alternate uniforms in recent years, such as the black version, but when you have a classic brand you shouldn’t mess with it. Same with the Celtics, Bulls, Sixers, and other classic uniforms — if you’re going to go alternate then go older.

The Lakers are doing just that — going back to Minneapolis.

They are breaking out the George Mikan era jerseys, starting on Wednesday vs. Wizards and in four other games later in the season.

I like it.

Now if the Lakers could get George Mikan in the paint it would help.

PBT Podcast: All things Sixers with Jessica Camerato of NBC Sports Philadelphia

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The Sixers have started the season 0-3, Joel Embiid is frustrated about his lack of post touches, and Markelle Fultz‘s shot has gone funky…

Relax. The Sixers are going to be fine, and they still very well could be a playoff team in the East this season. It’s just three games (against teams expected to finish above the Sixers in the standings anyway).

Jessica Camerato of NBC Sports Philadelphia joins Kurt Helin on the Podcast today to talk all things Sixers. They discuss the things that have gone wrong, but also the culture Brett Brown has built, why the Sixers still have to be thought of as a playoff team, and why the future is bright. Also, there is a little discussion of the mess with the Phoenix Suns, their lack of a process, and how Eric Bledsoe could tilt things in the East.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, or listen and subscribe via iTunes (just click the button under the podcast), subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

Stephen Curry fined $50,000 for throwing mouthpiece

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Stephen Curry knew a fine was coming, the only question was how much? The NBA had established this precedent before: When Curry (or any player) threw his mouthpiece he got fined. That he’s done it before and threw it in the direction of an official this time meant the price could go up.

It did — Curry was slapped with a $50,000 fine for throwing his mouthpiece during the ejection from Saturday night’s Warriors loss to the Grizzlies. Curry felt he was fouled on a drive and didn’t get the call, and he lost his cool.

Andre Iguodala was also fined $15,000 for “verbally abusing a game official” during the same incident.

Some fans wanted a suspension for Curry, mostly because it’s trendy to hate on Curry and the Warriors in some circles. Reality is there is a precedent here, and the league office stuck with that. Now, if the mouthpiece had struck the official, Curry would have gotten a suspension. If you want to argue the intent was the same, call up the league. They make the distinction.