David Stern

If Stern penalizes players who sit to rest, watch “injuries” rise


Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.

David Stern has a lot of questions to answer if he is going to fine Gregg Popovich or Spurs owner Peter Holt for sitting Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili on Thursday night against the Heat. We have already covered those questions in detail.

It is within Stern’s right to make a league rule about playing healthy players (and 20 years ago he did fine Pat Riley for resting a healthy Magic Johnson in the final game of the season, although that same thing has gone unpunished since).

However, coaches want their players to rest. There are all kinds of studies that will show you rested players not only play better but also are less likely to be injured. They will find a way.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN was thinking along the same lines.

For years in the league, players that were not one of the 12 allowed to dress for each game had to be put on the injury list. To be put on the list officially teams had to announce an injury. In the absence of a legit condition, teams started routinely to announce players had been diagnosed with various forms of tendinitis.

If you researched the transactions from the 1990s and early 2000s, you’d have seen an incredible wave of patella tendinitis and Achilles tendinitis that sprawled across the NBA. Remarkably it often struck end of the roster players who rarely played. Thanks either to medical science or a change in paperwork, games missed due to such injuries have been eradicated like polio.

The magical cure was not a vaccination, but rather the league changed the rules so you could just designate a healthy player to sit.

But if Stern comes down on high with an edict about resting healthy players where fines could be forthcoming, suddenly the cases of tendonitis — or mild sprains, or other such maladies — will suddenly be on the rise again.

Just something to watch. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.

C.J. McCollum ejected for flagrantly fouling Gordon Hayward (video)

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I’m not sure C.J. McCollum meant to grab Gordon Hayward‘s neck. The 6-foot-8 Hayward elevated, and the 6-foot-4 McCollum just might not have been able to get high enough to make a play on the ball.

But McCollum did grab Hayward’s neck.

It was a dangerous and unnecessary play, especially in the preseason.

Report: Mavericks may be team interested in Larry Sanders

Larry Sanders
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The Dallas Mavericks are looking for a center— desperately at times, they brought JaVale McGee into training camp to get a look. They will start Zaza Pachulia and behind him it’s probably Samuel Dalembert once he gets healthy.

Which is why Dallas may be the team interested in Larry Sanders — Mark Cuban is a guy known for giving second chances in the league. But there have been no talks, yet, reports Tim MacMahon at ESPN.

Larry Sanders has been out of the game since his buyout last February trying to deal with his personal demons and may well not be ready to return. He may never return.

His couple seasons with the Bucks were filled with drama and issues. There was the nightclub brawl left him with an injured thumb in need of a surgery. There were the charges of animal cruelty. There was a five-game drug suspension. There was missed time for personal reasons. There was the 10-game suspension for marijuana use (he failed at least four tests to get there) — then that suspension was extended past the 10 games. In the end, he agreed to a buyout to get space away from the game to deal with his personal issues.

He may or may not be ready to return from that. He may or may not ever be ready. But if he decides to give it a try, NBA teams will be waiting. Maybe Dallas.