Phil Jackson, Brian Shaw

Commitment to Triangle Offense may be the reason Brian Shaw is not yet a head coach


Brian Shaw is currently an “associate head coach” with the Indiana Pacers, a title that may mean internally that he’s second in command, but has no league-wide significance beyond that.

He’s an assistant coach to everyone else, and though he’s had plenty of interviews with teams for a head coaching spot — nine of them, to be exact — he’s no closer now than he was when he was winning championships as a member of Phil Jackson’s coaching staff with the Lakers.

That Lakers connection is an important one, as it may be part of the reason why Shaw has yet to get his shot. The fact that he believes so strongly in the Triangle Offense that Jackson ran in both Chicago and Los Angeles could be what has kept other teams from pulling the trigger on Shaw thus far.

From Ric Bucher of

Shaw’s calling card is that he learned the Triangle under Phil Jackson, he of the 11 championship rings. Shaw helped win three of those rings as a player and two as an assistant coach. Several teams who have interviewed him say the Triangle is the offense he has proposed. The consensus around the league is that Shaw is the NBA equivalent of a great Concorde pilot: his resumè says he’s good at flying something no one believes can get off the ground.

As one of the GMs who has interviewed him explained: “The Triangle has never worked for anyone, anywhere, other than Phil, and that was only when he had Michael Jordan or Kobe Bryant. Let’s face it, how many of his assistants have gone on to be successful head coaches? Whether it’s fair or not, the perception is that it was all Phil and the Lakers’ ability to get whatever they needed. Another part is that the Lakers didn’t hire Shaw when they had the chance. If they didn’t think he could make it work for them, with all of their resources, can you really go to your owner with a convincing argument as to why he’s going to make it work for your team?”

All good points, and all legitimate concerns.

The Triangle Offense isn’t an easy one to implement, nor is it an easy one to teach to a team without the proper pieces to run it successfully. Jackson had the offense’s architect, Tex Winter, as a member of his staff throughout, along with assistants Frank Hamblen and Jim Cleamons who were familiar with it inside and out and able to teach and run it seamlessly.

Kurt Rambis tried to bring it with him to a rebuilding Minnesota team, and failed miserably doing so, getting fired after compiling a brutal record of 32-132 in his two seasons there.

Shaw will get more opportunities to interview. If he’s serious about becoming a head coach in this league, he should heed the implicit advice he’s received to this point during his travels, and find a way to sell his leadership skills and personal philosophy for success, while distancing himself from the Triangle Offense at the same time, despite where his experience with it has taken him.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

Leave a comment

Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.