Gregg Popovich

Heat barely beat undermanned Spurs, but controversy will linger beyond this game


The Heat did what they’ve been doing all season long on Thursday, which was play down to the level of their competition for the majority of the night, before ending up with a win after all is said and done.

Yes, Miami took care of the Spurs 105-100, but it wasn’t the same Spurs team that got out to a 13-3 record to start the season. That team featured Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Manu Ginobili all playing a heavy role in the outcome of San Antonio’s first 16 games of the year, but they weren’t even in the arena for this one, after being sent home by head coach Gregg Popovich to rest well before things even got started.

But between the Heat coasting and the Spurs reserves playing hard and with purpose, San Antonio was in the game all night long, and even held a seven-point lead with under five minutes to play after what seemed like a back-breaking three from Nando De Colo that was launched from a few feet beyond the top of the three-point arc.

Down the stretch, Miami’s offense ran through LeBron James, and the Heat were able to take the lead they would never relinquish thanks to a Ray Alen three-pointer — one that was assisted, of course, by James.

San Antonio got big performances from Gary Neal and Tiago Splitter, and had five players in double figures which kept the Heat guessing defensively. Despite the fact that the usual starters weren’t there, the Spurs that did play did so with a familiarity and team cohesion that is truly a credit to Popovich and his coaching style.

As for the Heat, this effort was par for the course. They similarly struggled with a far less talented Cleveland Cavaliers squad at home less than a week ago, only to rally in the game’s final two minutes to come away with the win. And, they needed overtime to defeat the Milwaukee Bucks at home just a few days before that.

With that being said, and despite the game’s competitive nature and the fact that it wasn’t decided until the final few possessions, Popovich’s decision was wrong, and David Stern said as much in a statement released shortly before tip-off.

That will be the lingering memory from this game — not the gutty effort of the Spurs reserves, and not the fact that the defending champs coasted to another home victory over a team less talented.

Popovich resting his star players will be the catalyst of conversation for days to come, and as Stern warned in his statement, so will whatever punishment he has in mind for the Spurs organization breaking a rule that, up until this point, has never formally existed.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.