Baseline to Baseline recaps: Nets beat Celtics with TKO

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Welcome to PBT’s roundup of the day in NBA action. Or, what you missed while watching a guy do a backflip on a surfboard….

Thunder 120, Rockets 98: Welcome back to Oklahoma City James Harden. After a warm reception from the crowd Harden was 3-of-16 shooting and struggled to defend Kevin Durant (who doesn’t?). And despite that the Rockets biggest problem was team defense. Brett breaks the game down for you here.

Wizards 84, Trail Blazers 82: The Wizards win! The Wizards win! Theeeeee Wizards win! But man it was ugly. This was our other game of the night and we broke it down as well.

Nets 95, Celtics 83: The Nets with this one on a technical knock out.

Boston lost this game before the fight that sent Rajon Rondo, Kris Humphries and Gerald Wallace to the showers just before halftime.

Boston lost this early. Kevin Garnett played the first 5:19 of the game and it was 14-9 Boston when KG went out Doc Rivers subbed him out with Chris Wilcox. The Nets immediately went on a 19-6 run and even when Garnett returned he couldn’t stop it and it grew into a 38-12 run. This game was over before Rondo stepped in to protect KG.

What should worry Celtics fans right now is the 22nd ranked defense in the league. Well, that and the healthy suspension about to come down on Rondo for instigating that fight.

Pistons 117, Suns 77: How can a team lose by 40 to the Pistons? Good question. Brett Pollakoff tried his best to answer it for us.

Knicks 102, Bucks 88: My favorite fans of the night were in Milwaukee, where they chanted “Brooklyn’s better” when Carmelo Anthony was shooting free throws.

Unfortunately the Bucks were not playing anywhere near the Nets level. They had no good answer for stopping Carmelo Anthony, who had 29 points on just 18 shots. And it was a night of key Knicks being efficient shooters with Tyson Chandler getting 17 points on 4-of-4 shooting, and Steve Novak dropped 19 points on 10 shots. The Knicks took control with a 9-0 run right before the half then a 10-0 run early in the third quarter. And Wednesday the Bucks had no amazing comebacks in them.

Bulls 101, Mavericks 78: Tom Thibodeau finally trusted his bench and they rewarded him with 50 points and an easy win over Dallas. Nate Robinson led the way for the bench, getting 14 points on 5-of-6 shooting. The Bulls also continued to play good defense, holding the Mavs to 34.6 percent shooting. Dallas really could use that Nowitzki guy back on offense.

Clippers 101, Timberwolves 95: Chauncey Billups was back and played nearly 20 minutes, and that was good to see. But the Clippers won this because they played good defense again in the second half — Minnesota shot just 25.6 percent as a team in the final 24. Kevin Love was off all night against the Clippers 3-of-12 shooting. DeAndre Jordan had 15 points and played well.

Jazz 96, Hornets 84: The Jazz pulled away in the third quarter and got the kind of comfortable win behind 19 points from Al Jefferson that should have the team smiling. But the Jazz may have lost Marvin Williams for a little while after his head hit the floor hard late in the third quarter, which led Utah to talk about a likely concussion after the game.

Grizzlies 103, Raptors 82: In the third quarter Utah shot 72.2 percent as a team with Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph combining for 15 points on 6-of7 shooting. Meanwhile Toronto shot 23.5 percent in the third quarter. Memphis won the third quarter by 18 points and made the fourth quarter basically meaningless. By the way, good on Mike Conley for out playing Kyle Lowry for the night — Lowry usually gets up for this matchup (remember it was Conley’s presence that had Memphis moving Lowry). Conley had 16 on the night.

Spurs 110, Magic 89: Manu Ginobili had 12 points in the first quarter, going 4-of-4 from three and sparking a 13-0 San Antonio run where they took a comfortable lead and the game was never really in doubt from there. San Antonio essentially did whatever they wanted, got whatever shots they wanted and met with little resistance. Did you expect otherwise? Ginobili had 20 points, Gary Neal 19.

Hawks 94, Bobcats 90: Ben Gordon almost won the Bobcats this game — he went off for 20 points in the fourth quarter and single handedly made this a game. The Hawks were up by 7 inside of 2:30 in the game but Gordon kept sinking contested threes. The Bobcats had a chance to win it with 5.2 seconds left, getting the ball down 1, and to tie it a few seconds later, but in both cases the Hawks — we’re looking at you Josh Smith — did a good job of denying a clean entry pass to Gordon. And that was enough. Smith, Al Horford and Lou Williams each had 17 for the Hawks.

Suns, Hawks say they won’t change strategy to tank

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Phoenix shut down healthy players in a transparent bid to tank last season. But Suns general manager Ryan McDonough said not to expect a repeat.

Scott Bordow of azcentral:

Wednesday, McDonough told azcentral sports that the Suns won’t approach the final 23 games of this season the same way. In other words, Phoenix isn’t tanking in order to improve its chances of landing the No. 1 pick in the May 15 draft lottery.

“We’re planning on doing what we have been doing, that’s playing our young players. For us, that’s not a change,” McDonough said. “… We want to continue to have them improve and get minutes and try to win as many games as we can.”

The Mike Budenholzer-coached Hawks also won’t sit their top players.

Michael Cunningham of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

Some other teams near the bottom of the standings have publicly proclaimed they will favor youth over experience for the final four-plus weeks of the season, but Budenholzer said he will stay the course.

“I think we’ve been a mix of young and veteran guys all year,” he said Wednesday. “I think the way we progressed through the season — of course when you start the season you think it could be a little different — (but) right now but I think the way we’ve played, and the way we continue to play, won’t be that much different.”

To some degree, McDonough and Budenholzer are just trying to avoid a Mark Cuban-esque fine. The NBA discourages most talk of tanking.

But Phoenix and Atlanta don’t need to change their rotations to tank. They’re already good at losing! Both teams are a league-worst 18-41.

Some teams will get more serious about tanking down the stretch. The Suns and Hawks are already there. That doesn’t make them more virtuous than the Mavericks.

Still, this is a tight race for the top of the lottery. Four other teams have just 18 wins. Another has only 19, and one more has only 20. If the Suns and Hawks need to get worse to improve draft position, I wouldn’t put it past either team.

By the way, that headline can be read a couple different ways. That’s intentional.

Report: Kyrie Irving requested trade after ‘sloppy’ discussion by Cavaliers’ front office

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The Cavaliers reportedly explored trading Kyrie Irving in June. He requested a trade in July.

Since dealt to the Celtics, Irving has said he’ll never pinpoint his precise reason for leaving Cleveland. But he also said the Cavs “didn’t want me there.”

Did the Cavaliers push him out?

Dave McMenamin of ESPN:

On the day of the NBA draft back in June, just days after Cleveland parted ways with former GM David Griffin, a robust Cavs contingent made up of front-office personnel, coaches and team support staff members held an impromptu, “what if?” discussion about Kyrie Irving’s future, multiple team sources confirmed to ESPN.

The discussion, characterized as “small talk” by one source familiar with its content, was less a formal straw poll of what the Cavs should do with their All-Star point guard should trade opportunities present themselves, and more a thought exercise anticipating what the market could bear for a player of Irving’s caliber.

The talk got back to Irving, multiple team sources told ESPN, and that served as the tipping point that led to Irving formally requesting a trade a little more than two weeks later.

“It was sloppy,” one league source familiar with the draft-day discussion told ESPN, adding that any talk about trading a player of Irving’s ilk — however informal it might be — should be handled strictly between the GM and owner, because of the sensitive nature of its content.

While Altman was involved in the meeting, he and Mike Gansey — at that point officially the head of the Cavs’ G League team — were only keeping the ship afloat on an interim basis and had yet to be formally elevated to their current roles as GM and assistant GM, respectively.

This is one spin on the story. Yet another: Irving initially requested a trade before the draft and considered requesting one in 2016.

Both sides are trying to blame the other for the disintegration of their relationship.

It can be difficult to read how serious the draft-day discussion was. Maybe Irving interpreted ut correctly. Maybe he didn’t. Maybe he just used it to justify a trade request he wanted to make anyway.

What’s more clear: Communication hasn’t been as strong between the front office and players under general manager Koby Altman as it was under Griffin. McMenamin:

While the Cavs were struggling in late December through early January, LeBron James questioned Altman’s absentee status on a long Cleveland road trip, team sources told ESPN.

Altman helped repair that relationship leading up to the trade deadline, looping LeBron in on discussions that culminated with three trades. LeBron appears more invested in the Cavaliers, just in time to keep him next summer.

But some mistakes can’t be fixed before it’s too late. Maybe those Irving trade talks in June were one of them.

Report: NBA considering play-in tournament for playoffs

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Adam Silver and LeBron James are publicly arguing about 1-16 playoff seeding.

But that’s not the only change to the NBA’s postseason potentially afoot.

Zach Lowe of ESPN:

sources say there is also some behind-the-scenes momentum for the idea of a play-in tournament determining the last two seeds in each conference — to the point that two specific proposals are circulating at the highest levels within teams and the league office.

The play-in proposal that has generated the most discussion, according to several sources: two four-team tournaments featuring the seventh, eighth, ninth, and 10th seeds in each conference. The seventh seed would host the eighth seed, with the winner of that single game nabbing the seventh spot, sources say. Meanwhile, the ninth seed would host the 10th seed, with the winner of that game facing the loser of the 7-versus-8 matchup for the final playoff spot.

It is not coming next season, and it would be a shock if the NBA adopted it in time for 2020 or even 2021. It may never happen. Any such change would need approval from the competition committee, and then from a supermajority of 23 NBA teams. That process has not even started.

The NBA playoffs, with best-of-seven series, makes it more likely the better team advances. The NCAA tournament, with one game per team per round, generates excitement with increased variance and upsets.

Each format presents its own pros and cons, and I think too many NBA people seek the unpredictability of college basketball without considering the tradeoffs.

But I actually like this, because it makes the long regular season matter more. Each play-in seed faces a progressively easier route to the real playoffs:

  • No. 7 seed: Win one of up to two home games
  • No. 8 seed: Win one road or one home game
  • No. 9 seed: Win one home and one road game
  • No. 10: Win two road games

With more doors open to post-regular-season basketball, that’d theoretically curb tanking. Most tanking occurs lower in the standings, and the NBA hopes its lottery reform will address that. But this could incentivize teams otherwise be out of the playoff race to keep competing.

There are still plenty of questions to answer: How is revenue from the play-in tournament distributed? Could it work in conjunction with 1-16 seeding? How are are play-in-tournament teams treated in the lottery?

But this at least seems plausible.

Anthony Davis on Kevin Garnett saying he regrets not leaving Timberwolves sooner: ‘It makes you think’

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Kevin Garnett spent his first 12 seasons with the Timberwolves, only once advancing past the first round. Yet, he remained loyal to Minnesota. Finally, he helped facilitate a trade to the Celtics by signing a contract extension contingent on the deal. His first year in Boston, he won a championship while playing with Paul Pierce, Ray Allen and Rajon Rondo.

Jay King of MassLive:

Keep in mind, this is only Pierce’s description of Garnett’s words. Even if completely accurately relayed, it’s easier for Garnett to say this in hindsight – and while he’s mad at the Timberwolves.

But no matter the context, this resonated with Anthony Davis, who missed the playoffs in four of his first five years with the Pelicans and has never won a postseason game.

Davis, in an interview with Rachel Nichols of ESPN:

When you hear that, it makes you think. Not gonna lie. It makes you think, because you’re wondering if you’re following in that same path. But then again, you’re like, oh, this year could be the year. You don’t know. So, you’ve just got to take it year-by-year and just see, see where the team is going, what direction they want to go to and just see where their head is.

For years, Davis insisted his loyalty to the Pelicans was unwavering. Now, he keeps dropping hints he could move on.

That doesn’t mean he will. I still believe winning in New Orleans is his priority.

But what if the Pelicans don’t win? If they re-sign DeMarcus Cousins, they’ll be deeply committed to a roster that isn’t even a playoff lock. If they don’t re-sign Cousins, they’ll have no mechanism to add a comparable replacement. It’s the same damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t choice that led to Jrue Holiday‘s massive contract last summer.

At some point, Davis – who can become an unrestricted free agent in 2020 – might have to choose between major winning and New Orleans. And he might leave.

He’s so good already, but even he must imagine how he’d perform on a team with even more weapons around him. He in particular can use the support.

Maybe the Pelicans can upgrade his supporting cast. He seems to be applying pressure on them to do so.

But if not, we’ll at least have seen his departure coming.