Jeremy Lin

Coach says Jeremy Lin benched in fourth because of defense


It was a back-and-forth game in the fourth quarter Wednesday night between the Rockets and Bulls, one that wasn’t decided until a late 10-0 Rockets run.

And Jeremy Lin wasn’t on the court for much of it.

After a regular nearly 9 minute stint to open the second half, Lin came out and barely got back in. While the other Rocket starters returned Lin played just 2:17 in the fourth quarter while veteran guard Toney Douglas got most of the run as the Rockets looked to counter Nate Robinson (who was having one of those “good Nate” nights).

So what gives, interim Rockets coach Kelvin Sampson? It’s about defense, he told

“You have to go with your instincts,” Sampson said. “You’re not always right with that stuff. But I felt like Toney gave us our best chance to win. Yeah, a much better matchup with Nate.”

Lin himself was more direct and honest.

“Yeah, I think that’s for reasons of defense,” Lin said. “I’m not really sure. Ask Coach. But I think it’s a defensive thing. I didn’t do a very good job of making Nate Robinson uncomfortable. I’ve got to do a better job.”

This isn’t the first time — a week ago, when Portland came-from-behind to beat the Rockets it was Damian Lillard scoring 11 points in the fourth quarter and Lin getting shuffled in and out because of defense.

You can overlook a guard’s defensive failings if he is giving you a lot on the other end of the floor (see Steve Nash). But Lin isn’t doing that either, he’s struggled to find his shot this season and is hitting just 28.8 percent of his shots in the Rockets last seven games.

Lin is in a better spot in Houston than New York for this — he is still a young point guard trying to learn how to play the position in the NBA. He’s no longer a kid wonder nobody really knew about, teams have scouted him now and the book on defending him is out. Like an MLB pitcher that mows down hitters his first few games up from the minors, soon hitters adjust to him and then the pitcher must adapt to stay ahead of them — that is where Lin is. He has to grow and adapt. That’s coming in fits and starts. We’ll see if he can do it, but at least his struggles are not splashed every day all over the back page of the New York Post. He gets to figure it out in relative quiet.

But he needs to start figuring it out at both ends or those minutes will eventually start to dry up. Especially the key minutes late in games.

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Report: Wizards signing Ryan Hollins

Blake Griffin, Ryan Hollins
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Nene hurt his calf. Drew Gooden is banged up. Martell Webster is out for the season.

Those are three players the Wizards expected to play power forward this season.

So, Washington – which has lost four straight – will bring in another big man: Ryan Hollins.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

The Wizards have a full roster of 15 players. They don’t qualify for a hardship exemption, which a team gets if four players have missed three straight games and will continue to be out. Only Webster and Alan Anderson definitely fit that bill. Gooden, who has missed five straight, might. But it’s unclear both how many of those absences were due to injury and when he’ll return.

So, Washington will have to waive someone to sign Hollins now. It’ll probably be Webster, whose $5,845,250 2016-17 salary is just $2.5 million guaranteed. If he’s out for the year and the Wizards plan to drop him by the summer to clear cap space, why not just do it now?

Hollins is more center than power forward and doesn’t appear to fit well with Marcin Gortat. But at this point, Washington just needs big bodies. Hollins – a nine-year veteran who plays decent interior defense, lacks offensive skill and rebounds poorly for his 7-foot frame – is at least that.

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