Clippers have no trouble blowing out your defending champion Miami Heat

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The Clippers can make a legitimate claim to the title of the league’s top team, or at the very least, the best in the Western Conference. Their record now stands at 6-2 after an impressive routing of the Heat on Wednesday 107-100, and the teams ahead of them in the standings — the Spurs and the Grizzlies — have already fallen to L.A. this season.

Perhaps it’s a little early to get into all of that, so let’s focus on the way the Clippers had little issue with dismantling the defending champs. It started with really off nights from Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, and it ended with Chris Paul.

Wade was a game-time decision coming into this one, after twisting his ankle in Monday’s win over Houston. It was evident that he was not himself; Wade finished with just six points on 2-of-10 shooting, and suffered this humiliation at the hands of Eric Bledsoe.

Bosh wasn’t hampered by injury, but the team defense of the Clippers’ bigs down low made it tough for him to get clean looks. He finished with 11 points and nine rebounds, but was a miserable 3-of-13 from the field himself.

Given the rough night from two of the Heat’s main men offensively, it was a bit of a surprise to see Miami leading at the half, and still within just two at 72-70 with 3:22 to play in the third quarter.

Chris Paul decided he’d had enough, apparently, because he went on a personal scoring tear to finish the third quarter which put the game permanently out of reach.

Paul started with a couple of free throws, then drained a long three-pointer from almost 10 feet behind the arc. The next trip down, Paul hit another three in rhythm, and the Clipper lead was now eight. He was feeling it, and drove to the hoop on the next possession, but was fouled. He hit two more free throws, then two more, then converted the technical free throw after Wade got tangled up with Ryan Hollins and shoved him with two hands to get free.

When it was all said and done, it was 13 straight points from Paul to end the period that began to put this game away for the Clippers. And to start the fourth, the bench unit finished the job.

Bledsoe picked up right where Paul left off, and scored eight straight Clippers points of his own to push the lead to 17. This, by the way, came while the Heat had their starters in to try and close the gap.

LeBron James finished with 30 points for Miami on better than 50 percent shooting, but he got virtually no help from anyone else. Midway through the fourth he could be seen yelling to the bench, “Don’t take me out, man. Don’t take me out.” He remained in and helped cut into the lead that reached as many as 20, but once it was still at 14 with about two and a half minutes to play, Spoelstra waived the white flag and James went to the bench.

Really solid win for the Clippers, one of many early in the season. L.A. has size, depth, and most importantly, a superstar who’s as competitive as they come, and who is capable of completely dominating the game in stretches when his team needs him the most.

For the Heat, there’s far from anything to worry about, and you wonder if the team is still in “whatever” mode a little bit and experiencing the effects of a championship hangover; it’s rare that you would see Miami get blown out like they did in L.A. and like they did in Memphis a couple of games ago, and the Heat (save for James) didn’t seem all that interested in clawing their way back once the lead reached the mid-double digits early in the fourth.

That’ll likely change as the season rolls on. But for now, teams like Memphis and the Clippers are more dialed in, more hungry, and are happy to flex their muscle like this to get big, confidence-fueling wins over the defending NBA champs.

Larry Nance Jr. plays tribute to father — rock-the-cradle dunk in Suns uniform

Associated Press
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Back in 1984, high-flying Larry Nance Sr. won the first NBA All-Star Dunk Contest with this set of dunks — most famously a rock-the-cradle move.

Larry Nance Jr. came into the 2018 Dunk Contest and went nostalgic — all the way back to the Suns’ throwback uniform and the same dunk.

That and a good second dunk got him into the Dunk Contest finals. In that round, Nance Sr. threw an alley-oop to his son for the windmill.

Donovan Mitchell throws alley-oop to himself – off second backboard (video)

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LOS ANGELES – Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell set a high standard with the first slam of the 2018 dunk contest.

Very creative. Very well-executed.

Looks like all that preparation paid off.

Devin Booker’s 3-point-contest victory bright spot for Suns (video)

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Los Angeles – Devin Booker‘s Suns have the NBA’s worst record (18-41).

“I think everyone is fed up with the losing, from the top to the bottom of the organization,” Booker said this afternoon. “So, for us, it’s what’s next?”

A 3-point contest victory.

Overcoming Phoenix’s poor record to draw an invite to All-Star Saturday Night, Booker won the 3-point contest with a whopping 29 points in the final round.

That score left little margin for 2016 champion Klay Thompson, who capped the event with a 25-point round that was otherwise the night’s high. Clippers forward Tobias Harris, in his new home arena, finished third.

Booker was all smiles after the rare victory.

“Season not going how we planned, but I know a lot of the city was ready for this All-Star Weekend, having somebody participate,” Booker said. “So, I’m glad I could win it.

Where he and the Suns go from here is still questionable, but he has a plan.

“I’m going to win the dunk contest next year,” Booker said. “No, I’m just kidding.”

Full results

First round

Klay Thompson 19

Devin Booker 19

Tobias Harris 18

Wayne Ellington 17

Bradley Beal 15

Eric Gordon 12

Kyle Lowry 11

Paul George 9

Second round

Devin Booker 29

Klay Thompson 25

Tobias Harris 17

Spencer Dinwiddie not just happy to be here, wins All-Star Skills Contest

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LOS ANGELES — Anyone who knew the Spencer Dinwiddie story knew not to count him out when he looked down.

That was true when at Colorado he had played his way into the first round of the draft, maybe the 2014 lottery, until an ACL injury derailed him. He had to battle back from a devastating injury, push his way back through the then D-League to the NBA, and wait for his chance. When he got it this season in Brooklyn (after the Jeremy Lin injury) he grabbed it and has had a quality NBA season for the Nets.

So when Dinwiddie was behind the Kings’ Buddy Hield in the first round of the All-Star Saturday Night Skills Contest, he needed a little help. Dinwiddie got it when Hield missed his first three (you have to close out the race with a made three), Dinwiddie caught up and drained his on a pull-up jumper.

Forget the fact Dinwiddie is shooting 28.5 percent on pull-up threes this season, he did the same thing to Jamal Murray in the semi-finals.

Dinwiddie boat raced Bulls’ rookie Lauri Markkanen in the finals when the big man struggled with the passing skill and got so far behind it was over.

“It’s big for me to even be at All-Star Weekend considering the road that’s been in my career, very up and down, Dinwiddie said. “Obviously being in the G-League both on assignment and as a G-League player, thank you to the Brooklyn Nets for giving me this opportunity to play and be here.

Then it all really feels and seems full circle because I got to come home and do it in front of my family.”

Dinwiddie was born in Los Angeles and played his high school ball at Taft High School in Woodland Hills (in LA’s San Fernando Valley). He went against the likes of Jrue Holiday and DeMarre Carroll, and he learned some hard lessons there.

It’s all paying off now for Dinwiddie, who has proven he belongs in the NBA.

And that he’s got skills.