Jeff Green, Al Jefferson

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Celtics bench gets them a win

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Our nightly roundup of all the action in the NBA. Or, what you missed while thinking at least one drug dealer really cares….

Grizzlies 107, Thunder 97: We told you last week in the power rankings Memphis was for real. Believe us now? Brett Pollakoff broke down this game for us.

Clippers 107, Heat 100: Speaking of teams that are for real, meet the Los Angeles Clippers. They are getting much better play out of D’Andre Jordan and they are defending. Brett Pollakoff also broke this game down, too.

Celtics 98, Jazz 93: Boston’s bench was the key in this one. First, we have had a Jeff Green sighting (just ask Al Jefferson) and he had 16 points. Bigger still was Leandro Barbosa — Rajon Rondo left the game in third quarter with a sprained ankle but Barbosa was part of a Celtics team that made a key 14-2 run where they took control of the game. Boston’s bench accounted for 47 of their points. Paul Pierce added 23, Paul Millsap had 20 points and 12 boards.

Pistons 94, Sixers 76: Pistons win! The Pistons win! They are celebrating the Pistons first win of the season on the streets of Detroit. And if you are a Philadelphia fan you may want to ask — how did you just lose to the Pistons at home? Handily.

They lost because they shot 29.8 percent — they couldn’t throw a pea in the ocean (thanks Chick Hearn). They lost because they got outworked on the boards. They lost because they played like they didn’t care. Detroit played with the desperation of a team that needed a win — Greg Monroe had 19 points and 18 rebounds, while Kyle Singler added 16 points.

Bucks 99, Pacers 85: Wow, the Pacers are playing some bad ball right now. This was a 30-point beat down where Tyler Hansbrough and Sam Young made it look like a 14-point loss with a solid fourth quarter. The Bucks made a push at the start — they were up 7-0 and never trailed after that — and played pretty well the rest of the way. They got 16 points each from Monta Ellis and Brandon Jennings. But mostly, the Bucks just had to stay out of the way of the self-destruction.

Rockets 100, Hornets 96: In the first half James Harden was slashing to the rim at will, with Al-Farouq Aminu trying but unable to stay in front of him. Harden had 19 points in the first half (30 for the game) and when he re-entered in the second quarter it sparked a 17-4 run that capped a 39 point quarter for the Rockets and they were in total control. Credit New Orleans for chipping away at it and making a game of it — the Rockets didn’t pressure Greivis Vasquez and he put up 24 points, Ryan Anderson added 20 points and 12 rebounds. New Orleans got all the way back within 2 points in the final two minutes, but couldn’t complete the comeback.

Bulls 112, Suns 106 (OT): The Suns keep digging themselves holes then trying to climb themselves out — this time it was 18 points. They almost did climb out against the Bulls — they forced overtime. But a10-2 Bulls run in overtime and Chicago gets a win in the first game of its dreaded annual circus trip. Carlos Boozer scored 28 points and added 14 rebounds, Luol Deng and Joakim Noah each had 21 points. Luis Scola had 24 for the Suns while Michael Beasley and Shannon Brown were each 4-of-15 shooting on the night.

Bobcats 89, Timberwolves 87: The Charlotte Bobcats are on a three-game winning streak. If the playoffs started today, the Bobcats would be the seven seed in the East. Let that marinate for a minute. Charlotte was really in control of this game the entire second half, until a late 16-2 run by the Timberwolves (fueled by some bad Bobcats plays, such as Reggie Williams calling time out when they were out of them) tied it up — and set the stage for Kemba Walkers’ heroics. He had 22 on the night and the game winner. Ramon Sessions came off the bench and added 18 for Charlotte. Andrei Kirilenko led the Wolves with a game-high 26.

Mavericks 107, Wizards 101: Dallas was in control of this one, up 22 in the second half, but Washington opened the fourth quarter on an 18-3 run sparked by Kevin Seraphin. And it was a game. It was within three in the final minute when a Seraphin steal led to a Jannero Pargo open look three to tie it — and he missed. Next possession for Dallas O.J. Mayo fouled, hit the free throws (he had 25 points on the night) and that sealed the game. Chris Kaman had 23 for Dallas, Jordan Crawford 21 for Washington.

Hawks 92, Warriors 88: With Al Horford out and Josh Smith mired in an ugly slump (6-of-16 shooting in this one), the boards belonged to the Warriors in this one and it was key late. Up 3 inside of :30 in the game Stephen Curry missed a three but Harrison Barnes got the offensive board, was fouled, hit is free throws and iced the game. Barnes had his best night as a pro with 19 points and 13 rebounds. Kyle Korver scored all of his 14 points in the first half on 5-of-5 shooting. Ivan Johnson added 15 for the Hawks. David Lee had 18 points and 10 boards for Golden State.

Report: Stephen Curry still at 70 percent due to knee injury

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The Oklahoma City Thunder have overwhelmed the Golden State Warriors with their athleticism, their improved defense, and the shot making of stars Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. The Thunder are doing a lot of things right and have lifted themselves up to an elite status.

But the Warriors have not pushed back against this. Not like we expected the defending champions and a 73-win team would. Draymond Green is a shell of himself, a -72 the last couple games the Thunder have gotten in his head and have him second guessing his every decision.

Then there is Stephen Curry, who is 13-of-37 shooting the past two games, 5-of-21 from three, and a -58. He hasn’t carried the Warriors as he did for stretches this season, and it is lingering issues from his knee injury that are partially holding him back, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

Curry has been a shell of himself – missing shots, throwing away passes, losing his dribble, and completely unable to prove that there’s Curry-esque agility in that knee. “He’s playing at 70 percent, at best,” a source close to Curry told The Vertical. Curry refuses to make excuses, but privately the Thunder see something – no explosion, no ability to make the bigs switching onto him pay a price. Twenty points on 19 shots Tuesday night bore no resemblance to the two-time NBA Most Valuable Player.

Curry missed a couple of weeks of play with a sprained MCL, but returned last round.

There have been flashes of that old Curry since his return — the monster fourth quarter and overtime against Portland in Game 4, or the third quarter of Game 2 against the Thunder — but what made Curry a back-to-back MVP was a sustained level of excellence, and that has gone away. He just can’t flip the switch and change a game right now the way he could for most of the past couple seasons.

You can tell the Thunder sense it — they are going right at him, attacking Curry’s defense knowing he can’t move well enough to handle their athletes. There is no mercy in the NBA and if teams sense a weakness they will exploit it — the Thunder sense that with Curry.

The way the Thunder are playing, a healthy Curry may not have made a difference, but you can bet the last couple games would not have been the same blowouts.

 

Report: David Fizdale to get second interview in Memphis, meet with owner

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David Fizdale has sat next to Erik Spoelstra in Miami for the past few seasons knowing he’s one of those top assistant coaches who was eventually going to get a shot in the big chair. The only question was where and when.

The answer may be Memphis right now.

Fizdale has a second interview coming with the Grizzlies, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

This would be a good hire for Memphis (although whether he is better than Dave Joerger — the coach the Grizzlies fired when he asked if he could talk to Sacramento about their job — is certainly up for debate).

In Miami, Fizdale had won the trust and respect of a team full of players that had won rings. He was a guy they leaned on and went to. As an example, Fizdale worked hard with LeBron James on developing a post game; he was the guy LeBron trusted.

Fizdale deserves a shot, it sounds like Memphis may be that place.

Five things Thunder did to go from good to brink of reaching NBA Finals

OAKLAND, CA - MAY 16:  Billy Donovan of the Oklahoma City Thunder high fives Serge Ibaka #9 and Kevin Durant #35 during game one of the NBA Western Conference Finals against the Golden State Warriors at ORACLE Arena on May 16, 2016 in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Oklahoma City won 55 games this season — most years that win total would have it entering the playoffs considered a contender. Plus, the Thunder have Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant, two top five players in the league. However, with the 73-win Warriors and 67-win Spurs ahead of them, the Thunder felt more like a good but flawed team doomed to an early exit and a summer of speculation.

Now the Thunder are one win away from knocking off both the Spurs and Warriors back-to-back.

What changed? What did we miss? Here are five things the Thunder are doing better now than they did all season, the things that have propelled them within one game of the NBA Finals.

1) Defense. The Thunder were an okay defensive team this season, allowing 103 points per 100 possessions they ranked 12th in the league. That got worse after the All-Star break when the Thunder allowed 105.7 points per 100 possessions, ranked 16th. Over the final month, they would show flashes of how they could play lock down defense, but they could not sustain it.

Now, this is a team that has held the feared Warriors’ offense to 88.9 points per 100 possessions Tuesday, and 98.1 in Game 3. It’s a change thanks to a focused energy and attitude, but also some technical steps as well. For one, they have become fluid at switching on picks — both on and off the ball — and they are communicating when they do. More importantly, they are smart in doing it, knowing when to go under or when to ignore the pick whatsoever. That combined with their athleticism lets them make up ground if they get a step behind, and their length allows them to get into passing lanes to create turnovers, and to challenge shots — the blocks and deflections have gotten in the heads of the Warriors, who have become tentative, second guessing themselves. Mostly the Thunder are playing with a sustained focus and energy on that end of the floor we haven’t seen ever. It has flummoxed the Warriors, who are rushing shots or trying to do things in isolation more than moving the ball.

Mostly the Thunder are playing with a sustained focus and energy on that end of the floor we haven’t seen from them before. It has flummoxed the Warriors, who are rushing shots or trying to do things in isolation more than moving the ball.

“I think you have to build up stamina for that,” Thunder coach Billy Donovan said of the improved defensive energy and attention. “I think you have to have stamina to concentrate and focus and do what these guys do.”

2) Dion Waiters. Throughout his four NBA seasons, Waiters has never come close to playing as well, as consistently  as he has the past couple weeks. He’s like a different player. Waiters had a PER of 9.4 this season, the kind of number associated with being sent to the D-League. Credit to Donovan and the Thunder coaching staff, something has clicked with Waiters. Too often before he wanted to shoot like he was Russell Westbrook, now he has accepted the third (or fourth) man role on this team. His shot selection has improved, and with that he is knocking down his jumpers. Like the entire team (as noted above), his usually unfocused defense has suddenly become good almost every time down. He has become the third perimeter player the Thunder have needed for years.  With Waiters making plays, and more importantly accepting his role, the Thunder become that much harder to stop. The Warriors have not been able to.

3) Solving the Andre Roberson problem. The Golden State Warriors decided to treat Andre Roberson like they did Tony Allen from Memphis last playoffs — put a big on him (Andrew Bogut or Draymond Green), then have said big ignore him to stay near the basket to protect the rim. If Roberson wanted to shoot from the outside, the Warriors would let the notoriously poor shooter (31.1 percent from three this past season) have all the wide open shots he wanted. Memphis could never figure out how to deal with that and lost three straight to Golden State once this strategy was employed.

Billy Donovan made a great adjustment — he turned Roberson into a power forward/center, then surrounded him with shooters. This allows the active Roberson to set the pick for Westbrook (or whomever), then roll right down the lane to the basket for a dunk.  That and some backdoor cuts had Roberson scoring a career-high 17 points and giving the Thunder the support they need around their big stars in Game 4.

“It’s funny because after Game 2 people were saying to me ‘is this guy even going to play anymore?’” Donovan said. “Andre’s a good basketball player, and I think one of the things that go missing with him is he makes winning plays and he’s a winning player. There are a lot of things he can do, offensive rebounds and slashing to the basket, I have confidence in him shooting the basketball.”

4) They are one team that could play small and run with Golden State. The Warriors small-ball lineup was so feared around the league it earned the nickname The Death Lineup. It killed teams. Nobody could keep up the scoring machine that was the Warriors going small.

Until the Thunder went small in Game 3 and ran right past the death lineup (which was -22 for the game). The Thunder are the one team with the depth of athleticism to go small with the Warriors and hang, but this lineup had been destroyed by the Spurs so it was a risk to roll it out again. It worked this time around — the Thunder become so much faster and guys like Westbrook and Durant are impossible to stop in transition. The real key is despite going small the Thunder defense didn’t suffer —  Serge Ibaka (or Steven Adams), plus guys like Durant have done a fantastic job protecting the rim.

“It’s not about what is or is not going to work, sometimes you just got to put stuff out there based on teams. You’ve got to be willing to take some risks and do that…” Donovan said postgame

“Sometimes you’ve got to evaluate things within the series you’re playing against. So, why were the numbers bad? And was there any way with adjustments could we make those numbers better.”

Turns out, yes there was.

5) Billy Donovan has been fantastic. Donovan went toe-to-toe with Gregg Popovich, and now Steve Kerr, and it is the NBA rookie who is making the right adjustments. Like the small ball lineup, or using Roberson like a center.

More than that, Donovan has gotten buy-in from his players. They trust and are playing the system. The Thunder were never this focused and willing to sacrifice — Durant and Westbrook both fought staggering their minutes in the past, the defense was unfocused, and Waiters did whatever it is Waiters wanted to do. Donovan has solved all those problems, and it all starts with the players buying what Donovan is selling. After a season where he had to learn on the job the hard way — because Monte Williams (the tragic death of this wife) and Maurice Cheeks (injury) were taken off his bench for long stretches — Donovan has figured things out. He’s getting the kind of buy in Scott Brooks never seemed to have.

And with that, Donovan and the Thunder are within a game of the NBA Finals.

Watch Russell Westbrook drop 36 on Golden State in Oklahoma City win

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Once again, Russell Westbrook was the force of nature the Warriors could not solve.

The athletic point guard forced turnovers, threw it down in transition, and drove right past Stephen Curry or  was guarding him. The result was 36 points, 11 rebounds, and 11 assists — Westbrook’s first triple double of these playoffs.

“He’s got such great force and great will,” Thunder coach Billy Donovan said after the Thunder’s Game 4 win. “And he’s really a high IQ basketball player, he sees a lot of things going on out there… As a coach, you have great respect and admiration for a guy who plays the game that hard and gives to our team what he gives.”

He helped give them a win that has the Thunder on the verge of a return to the NBA Finals.