What is wrong with Rodney Stuckey’s game?

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At this stage of the season, all analysis of teams and players should be framed by the small sample size caveat. Whether a player is is shooting the lights out or stinking up the joint, allowing performance to regress (or progress) to the mean is going to be the best approach. It’s too long a season to reasonably conclude that what we see today will be a season long trend.

That said, I don’t think it is too early to ask one question: what is wrong with Rodney Stuckey?

Yes, the season is young but Stuckey looks to be completely out of sorts to start the campaign. Through three games, Stuckey is only shooting 4.3% (!!) from the field, making only a single basket in twenty-two attempts from the floor. In his last two contests he’s not made a single field goal (0-13) and has only scored a single point in 47 minutes of action.

While in Stuckey’s case it is severe, some erratic shooting can be explained through bad luck or the simple fact that anomalies occur. But when digging into Stuckey’s numbers (and when watching him play) you see that there are some alarming trends.

First off, and most notable, is that Stuckey simply isn’t as involved in the Piston’s offense as he typically has been. His usage rate (estimation of possessions used while on the floor) is 15.5 which would be the lowest mark of his career by a wide margin. To put that mark in perspective, that’s a number that non-playmakers post (last season Matt Barnes had a usage of 15.5) and is more indicative of a spot up option rather than an attack player.

This marginalization of Stuckey’s role could have something to do with how he’s playing. After all, he’s used to being the key ball handler and offensive creator for his team but is making the full-time move to shooting guard this season with the emergence of Brandon Knight at point guard. With the Pistons also looking to be more of a post up oriented team with Greg Monroe demanding more of an offensive role, Stuckey could just be struggling to find his way in a new role as an off the ball player.

That said, even when he has the ball he’s not really looking to be the same attack style player he has been in his first five seasons. He’s still driving the ball into the paint well — half his shots this season have come in the restricted area — but he’s not hunting contact like he has in season’s past, instead trying to be more of a finesse player around the basket. Per-36 minutes his free throw attempts per game are the lowest of his career and is indicative of his lack of assertion around the basket.

It’s only fair to point out that not all of Stuckey’s game is bad. He’s doing well to set up his teammates — his assists per-36 minutes is 2nd highest rate of his career — and he’s moving the ball on to open teammates even if only to keep the flow of the offense going. His turnover rate is also down and it’s good to see that his adjustment to playing more off the ball has led to him making more controlled reads.

However, what some of the stats and what watching the tape tells me is that Stuckey isn’t just playing controlled but he’s also playing safe. There’s a fine line between the two but when he’s been most successful there’s been a certain amount of risk attached to his game. This season that’s been missing. And the result has been a player that lacks the same aggression, and thus, the same results.

The season is early yet. And maybe Stuckey will find his way soon. But his play to start the season has to be a concern for the Pistons. He’s too good a player to look this bad.

Underdog Cavs insist they have plenty of bite for Finals

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INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) — They are defending champions and decided underdogs.

The Cleveland Cavaliers, however, say they aren’t using any snubs to get ready for the NBA Finals.

Set for a third straight championship matchup against Golden State, the Cavs are ignoring the Las Vegas odds makers and others who don’t think they have a shot at beating Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant & Co.

Cavs coach Tyronn Lue doesn’t feel his team needs the underdog label for inspiration, saying being in the NBA Finals is “enough motivation alone.”

Kevin Love was reminded that Warriors forward Draymond Green said earlier this season that he wants to “destroy and annihilate” the Cavs in the Finals. Says Love said: “He wanted us, and he has us starting next Thursday.”

 

Check out Kawhi Leonard’s highlights from this past season (VIDEO)

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Russell Westbrook and James Harden were putting up the bigger numbers, they were drawing more attention. And while MVP is a regular season award, nobody has boosted their MVP credentials more in the postseason than Kawhi Leonard.

He had a really impressive regular season, too. Since we’re on a long break between games, enjoy the highlights of Leonard’s season. He may enter next season as the MVP favorite.

Kevin Love on Cavaliers: “I don’t feel like we’re underdogs”

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Kevin Love and Las Vegas bookmakers do not see things the same way.

In Vegas, the Golden State Warriors are heavy favorites to win the title — bet $100 on them to win and you get back $41.7 (or less). Cleveland is a heavy underdog.

Love sees a confident team that is the defending NBA champions, as he told Dave McMenamin of ESPN.

“The whole underdog thing is funny to me, because, yeah, at the end of the day we are defending our title,” Love said Saturday after the Cavs’ first practice in preparation for the Warriors since clinching a spot in the Finals. “We’re trying to repeat, which is so hard to do. I think we will use it as fuel, we will use it as motivation, but the idea of playing into it? It’s tough for me to say that is the case. I don’t feel like we’re underdogs. We match up well with them, and I think they’d say the same about us.”

What else was he going to say?

More than any other team in the league, the Cavaliers are built to give Golden State trouble. The Cavaliers can exploit mismatches, be physical on defense, and they have LeBron James, Love and Kyrie Irving. Three NBA stars.

Is that enough against four NBA stars is the question.

Mike Brown still waiting on Tyronn Lue to pay up overdue bet

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Mike Brown is ready for Tyronn Lue to pay up on a nearly two-decade-old bet. Yep, Lue owes him $100 and Brown plans to accept it at long last – perhaps even during the NBA Finals when they see each other.

All this time Brown never wanted the money he earned by beating Lue in a shooting contest when the Cavaliers coach was an NBA newcomer, yet Golden State’s acting coach – who spent two stints leading Cleveland – joked how Lue can surely afford it these days.

“I’m glad he finally admitted that he owes me money because for many years he wouldn’t admit that he owed me money. He does owe me $100 and since he got his new deal hopefully he can afford to pay me now,” Brown said Saturday post-practice. “I asked him many time for it but he’s denied it. He’s denied that the game ever took place.”

Lue insists he has tried to pay up – time and time again, to no avail.

“Mike, I owe him $100 from when I was a rookie. That’s all I ever know about Mike,” Lue said Saturday. “I tried to pay him and he wouldn’t take the money so he says I always owe him. He’s always been a great guy.”

The 40-year-old Lue was rewarded with a contract extension after the Cavs’ championship run last June for the city’s first major sports title in 52 years. Cleveland overcame a 3-1 Finals deficit to the Warriors, and now the teams are preparing to face off for a third straight year.

“I think what it has to do with, it has to do with the fact he’s got a nice, long, fat contract with the Cavs and he realizes that he can finally afford to pay me the money that he owes me for the shooting game back in 2000 or whenever it was,” Brown said with a grin.

Brown acknowledged he cannot recall any other details such as how many shots each man made, saying: “I don’t even remember, that was back when I was in shape and a good shooter. He’d kill me now”

“Yeah, he was with the Spurs and I was with the Lakers and we had a little shooting contest and I lost,” Lue said. “He wouldn’t take the money so from now on 19 years in a row always says, `You owe me $100.’ He won’t take the money. Always been close to Mike and I like Mike a lot, respect him a lot.”