The interconnectivity of the Lakers’ problems


If you ask five people what’s wrong with the Lakers, you’re likely to get five different answers. That’s what happens when a team with that caliber of talent opens the season 0-2. There are simply too many things to pick at for there to only be one thing wrong.

That said, the Lakers issues aren’t just these individual problems that exist in a vacuum. They are not compartmentalized where if one thing is fixed they can check it off a list and move on to the next thing.

No, the Lakers problems are interconnected where one thing is done wrong and that leads to another issue popping up and then it just compounds from there. Worse yet, there’s a chicken and the egg nature to these problems in that it’s actually quite difficult to suss out where their issues begin and where they end.

Is it the much maligned offense?

Is it the underperforming defense?

Actually, it’s both and the problems at each end of the floor are fueling each other.

On offense, the implementation of the Princeton has had its hiccups. Steve Nash has looked more like Steve Blake, getting rid of the ball early and often in possessions and spectating off the ball for long stretches. Furthermore, players have looked confused on what their next move should be, too often thinking about where to go rather than reading and reacting to the defense.

The Lakers have also been too slow in how they’re attacking on offense. They’re not pushing the ball and they’re slow to get into their sets. This is leading to too many possessions where they have to execute well in the half court — which they’re not doing well — and that’s leading to long misses, turnovers, and generally uneven play.

These offensive woes are then generating many of their defensive problems.

When the Lakers are forced into taking a long jumper their opponent is grabbing a long rebound and attacking them in the open court to make them defend in transtion. Because the Lakers are older and not very quick to change ends, they’re getting taken advantage of more often than not. When the Lakers turn the ball over, this lack of transition D is amplified and it is almost guaranteed that their opponent is going to get a shot at the rim or the type of rhythm pull up jumper that teams thrive on.

Even when the Lakers aren’t trying to defend in transition, they’re suffering on that end of the floor. Their lack of cohesion on D is seen clearly on missed rotations to the rim, the surrendering of offensive rebounds because they’re not helping the helper, haphazard closeouts on shooters, and poor pick and roll coverage.

And these defensive woes only fuel more of the Lakers problems on offense. When teams score, the Lakers are forced to inbound the ball and it slows down their entire attack. This also allows the defense to get set and, in some cases, set up full court pressure to further keep the team from playing at a good tempo. The result is the Lakers starting possessions halfway through the 24 second clock which limits their ability get comfortable in their offense.

And right back to square one we go. It’s like a downward spiral of poor execution.

There’s no simple fix here either. The team can start by playing better defense, but that will need to be aided by crisper offensive execution, better floor balance to defend against fast breaks, and cutting down on the turnovers that allow teams to score easy baskets. They can start to refine their offense, but to do so they’ll need to start getting stops on defense so they can push the ball up the floor and get into their sets faster. They will also need to figure out how they want to run the Princeton and get more out of Steve Nash in the process.

At this point, though, the Lakers need to start to improve somewhere. Because just like there’s a domino affect in how bad plays begat bad plays, the inverse will also be true. For their sake, it better start soon.

LaMarcus Aldridge’s 39 points lead Spurs past Wolves, 117-101

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) – LaMarcus Aldridge had 39 points and 10 rebounds, and the San Antonio Spurs overcame a sluggish start to beat the Minnesota Timberwolves 117-101 on Saturday night.

San Antonio won its third straight to move into fifth in the Western Conference five days after dropping to 10th and out of playoff position.

Karl-Anthony Towns had 23 points and nine rebounds for Minnesota, which dropped to sixth in the West.

The Spurs had lost three straight and nine of 11 but are now unbeaten halfway through a six-game homestand.

San Antonio shot 84 percent in the second quarter, their best shooting quarter since 2010.

Two nights after battling New Orleans’ Anthony Davis on both ends, Aldridge had to take on another All-Star in Towns. Aldridge responded by leading the Spurs in scoring for the 49th time this season while helping keep Towns in check.

Aldridge scored 18 of 21 points during a five-minute stretch in the second quarter, including 12 straight. He capped the run by coming from the weak side to swat Towns’ floater deep into the seats.

Minnesota started quickly, shooting 78 percent from the floor in the first 5 1/2 minutes while San Antonio floundered at 17 percent. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich called timeout, only to watch the Timberwolves’ Jeff Teague steal the ball once play resumed.

The Spurs responded behind veteran reserves Manu Ginobili, Tony Parker, Pau Gasol and Rudy Gay. San Antonio went on a 16-4 run bridging the first and second quarters to take a 29-26 lead.

Andrew Wiggins scored 21 points for Minnesota and Teague had 16.


Stan Van Gundy goes off on officials: “We got absolutely screwed all night”

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The Pistons were likely to lose to the red-hot Trail Blazers on the road, and that came to be Saturday night 100-87, Portland 12th straight win. The Pistons shot 38.8 percent for the game and had a dreadful offensive rating of 93.8 (points per 100 possessions).

Portland is one the top five defensive teams in the NBA this season, but that’s not what Detroit coach Stan Van Gundy thought was the problem — he laid the blame on the officiating.

That’s going to be a fine.

Van Gundy is frustrated — with this game and with this season. So are Pistons fans, and seemingly so is Detroit owner Tom Gores after his lukewarm vote of confidence in Van Gundy recently. They should be, this team is a disappointment and the Blake Griffin trade was a big swing that has yet to work out. The Pistons are going to miss the playoffs. Around the league, the sense is that Van Gundy will lose his GM job to former super agent Arn Tellem, who was brought in to guide the Pistons into their new building but now whose talents would better serve the basketball side of the operation. The only question is will Van Gundy still be coaching in Detroit next season — just coaching, like Doc Rivers with the Clippers — or of the change will be more sweeping than that.

Hornets’ coach gives savage, frank assessment of Willy Hernangomez

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When Willy Hernangomez was not getting much run with the Knicks this season, especially as injuries opened up space in the front line rotation, there were questions as to why. Then the #freeWillyHernangomez movement popped up.

Eventually, Hernangomez was traded to the Hornets where… he barely plays. He’s gotten more than 10 minutes just once since coming to Charlotte.

What gives? Hornet’s coach Steve Clifford didn’t hold back when answering that question to Marc Berman of the New York Post.

“If you were in one place and didn’t play much, if you want to play more in the next place, I’d say work harder and kill myself,” Clifford said at the Hornets shootaround at the Players Association’s midtown headquarters. “The reality is he wasn’t playing here for a reason. He’s got to change things…

“He’s not up to speed on what we’re doing to play a lot,” Clifford said. “It’s been a little bit of a struggle for him. He’s smart, but he’s not this high-flier, phenomenal, natural athlete able to make up ground. He’s got to be on top of things, especially on the defensive end. If he’s not detailed defensively, he’s not that [athletic] guy…

“To be an every-night player, and I’ve told him this, he’s got to improve his shooting,” Clifford said. “He is right now, in my opinion, a back-to-the-basket player who can pass. But the reality is his passing doesn’t come into play until they have to get close to him and know he’s not going to knock down a shot. And he’s not a knockdown shooter.”

Well then.

Just to be clear he’s got to put in a lot more effort, become smarter on the defensive end, and improve his shooting. That’s a healthy off-season checklist.

Hernangomez has another year on his contract at a very reasonable $1.5 million before the Hornets have to make any kind of decision on him, which means whoever is the new GM in Charlotte he will choose to keep Hernangomez around. For now. He flashed potential his rookie season with the Knicks, when asked to play strictly to his strengths, but Clifford and the Hornets — and basically every other team in the NBA — is going to ask more of him.

Clifford was clear, as no doubt he has been clear to Hernangomez (Clifford is as straight a shooter as the league has). The ball is in Hernangomez’s court.

Glen “Big Baby” Davis denies drug charges while eating Popeyes on a charter plane

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Best. Denial. Ever.

Last month, former NBA player Glen “Big Baby” Davis was arrested last month at a hotel in a suburb of Baltimore by Jimmy McNulty and Lt. Daniels with 126 grams of marijuana and more than $96,000 in cash, according to a police report. He has been charged with possession and intent to distribute.

Davis has declared his innocence in the best denial video ever — eating Popeyes chicken and flashing cash and a championship ring.

I have no idea whether Davis is guilty or not, I was not at a Hampton’s Inn outside Baltimore last month. The court system will sort that out, that is what it’s there for.

But I know a brilliant video when I see one. This is it.