Michael Jordan called the Thunder about trading for James Harden, and other interesting tales

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In a wide-ranging interview with Rick Bonnell of the Charlotte Observer, Michael Jordan said a lot of things that may be of interest to fans of both the Bobcats and the NBA alike.

One of the more interesting notes to fans of the league in general was the fact that Jordan said he “made some calls” to inquire about the availability of James Harden, before the Thunder ended up trading him to Houston for Kevin Martin, Jeremy Lamb, and a bag of basketballs some draft picks.

The entire transcript of the interview is worth a read, if only because Jordan doesn’t often make himself available in this way. But there’s also a bullet-point version, which we’ll duplicate below along with some thoughts on each.

– Jordan said the franchise is open to a nickname switch should New Orleans Hornets owner Tom Benson follow through on changing that team’s name (and Hornets becomes available once again).

The team’s nickname, colors, and uniforms are the least of Charlotte’s problems. The Bobcats have been over .500 just once in the team’s eight years since moving to Charlotte, and a history of questionable draft picks and decisions (or non-decisions) in free agency have them poised to repeat the feat in season number nine. The correct answer here from Jordan should have been an angry one taling about how he’s focused on the product on the court, and not the product in the gift shop.

– Jordan told players to stop complaining about new coach Mike Dunlap’s lengthy practices. “You can’t sit here and look yourself in the mirror and say we don’t need this stuff. If that was the case, we shouldn’t have been a 7-59 team. So in essence when you’re a 7-59 team, you go back to the basics, you go back to try and figure out a way, OK, we need to do this thing the right way. Either you buy in or you’re not a part of this whole process.”

In today’s NBA — or realistically, even in today’s society — players aren’t going to be able to focus for practices that last for three-plus hours. They’re just not. It’s easy to talk about your eight- or nine-hour work day and try to relate it to twenty-something athletes trying to focus on improving their fundamentals for a few hours, but it isn’t the same thing. I’m with Jordan that in principle, players should suck it up and get on the page. But reality says that Dunlap should be an effective enough communicator to be able to condense his message so his players are able to digest it over a shorter period of time.

– Jordan said the Bobcats “made a couple of calls’’ about shooting guard James Harden’s availability before the Oklahoma City Thunder traded Harden to the Houston Rockets this week.

This sounds exciting if (for some sick, sick reason) you’re actually a Bobcats fan, but in reality, 25 of the 30 NBA teams likely made the obligatory phone call to Sam Presti before Harden was ultimately dealt to the Rockets. This is what NBA GMs do — they make calls to other teams, on a fairly consistent basis, to see who’s available and who isn’t to determine if there are any realistic deals to be made. Again, this sounds exciting, but these conversations take place constantly throughout the course of an NBA season.

– Jordan said he still believes the Bobcats could be an attractive destination for major free agents down the road, but “I also understand we’ve got to get our house in order, to make that attractive to people.’’

I’ve got nothing on this one. Truer words have never been spoken.

Report: Timberwolves active in trying to land Paul George or Jimmy Butler

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Minnesota is one of the NBA’s best positioned up-and-coming teams. They have a franchise cornerstone in Karl-Anthony Towns, a quality No. 2 in Andrew Wiggins, maybe like Zach LaVine can blossom into an All-Star, and players such as Gorgui Dieng and Nemanja Bjelica could be part of the picture. Maybe Ricky Rubio, too, although he’s further along his career arc. A lot of people look at this team and think around 2020, when the Warriors fade (or break apart), the Timberwolves can step up to elite.

Tom Thibodeau is apparently not willing to be that patient — he’s looking to get in the Paul George/Jimmy Butler talks, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of the Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

Thibodeau helped develop Butler in Chicago and they have a great relationship, he certainly makes the Timberwolves better next season. Same with George, although he’s a rental who almost certainly bolts after the coming season

My question to the Timberwolves: Why?

What was wrong with the building trajectory they are on? I get it, they haven’t been to the playoffs since 2004, a ton of money was just sunk into upgrades at the Target Center, and the owner is not getting younger. Those are all non-basketball reasons to screw up what the basketball side is doing right. It’s the mistake of poor franchises to let that happen.

Could the Timberwolves use a point guard of the future, more depth on the wings and better defenders all around? You bet. But they don’t need to rush the development program either. If Minnesota can land Butler only giving up Rubio and a protected future first or something, sure, but the Bulls continue to ask a very high price for a deal.

Outside of personal feelings, why would the Timberwolves do that?

Report: LaMarcus Aldridge unhappy playing for Spurs

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The Spurs trading LaMarcus Aldridge – they’re reportedly shopping him – could open enough cap space to sign Chris Paul.

But that isn’t the only reason San Antonio is trying to move Aldridge.

Sam Amick of USA Today:

According to a person with knowledge of the Spurs forward’s situation, it’s the 31-year-old’s unhappiness in San Antonio that is the driving force behind the Spurs’ trade talks on Thursday. The five-time All-Star, according to the person, is hopeful that San Antonio can find a better fit for his talents.

Rumors about the Spurs trading Aldridge emerged early in the season, as he was reportedly unhappy about Kawhi Leonard getting the spotlight. When Aldridge signed with San Antonio, it seemed Leonard could do the heavy lifting as the team’s best player and Aldridge could get outsized credit as the leading scorer. But Leonard has emerged as the go-to offensive player, pushing Aldridge into a supporting role both in reality and reputation. Gregg Popovich calling out Aldridge publicly during the playoffs surely didn’t improve relations.

Aldridge turns 32 this summer and will likely become a free agent after next season. Wanting to leave the Spurs – held up as the NBA’s best culture – will raise additional red flags.

San Antonio might not get as much as it hopes in a trade for Aldridge. If Chris Paul is coming, the Spurs wouldn’t need as much for Aldridge. But they won’t know about Paul until July.

San Antonio also values building a roster of players who’ve, as Popovich puts it, “gotten over themselves.” If that’s not Aldridge, the Spurs might not want to keep him around.

There are numerous factors to weigh and incomplete information, but this is the twisting road San Antonio is navigating.

Here’s Knicks’ reported asking price from Celtics in Kristaps Porzingis trade

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Knicks president Phil Jackson’s asking price for Kristaps Porzingis is reportedly “massive.”

Just what does that mean?

Frank Isola of the New York Daily News:

According to a Knicks source, Jackson is asking for the third overall pick in Thursday’s draft as well as next year’s Brooklyn pick along with Jaylen Brown and Jae Crowder. This version of the deal would not include Boston taking on Joakim Noah‘s contract.

All the Knicks fans who threatened to relinquish their fandom if the team traded Porzingis – most would love this deal.

Would the Celtics? I doubt it.

The question is whether there’s a middle ground between what New York wants and what Boston would do. It’s possible Jackson won’t budge and is just shopping Porzingis on the off chance someone accepts outlandish requests like these and to teach Porzingis a lesson for skipping his exit meeting.

Report: First-round draft prospect says Phil Jackson fell asleep during his workout

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Like I said, there are better reasons to criticize Phil Jackson than him saying his priority was the Knicks and that he had discussed trading Kristaps Porzingis.

Jay Williams of ESPN:

A top-15 draft pick told me the other day, because we were involved in this out of this conversation about Phil Jackson and the Knicks, and he said, “Phil Jackson was falling in and out of sleep in my workout.”

Yes. “Falling in and out of sleep at my workout.” This is what this guy told me.

Especially given Jackson’s salary and reputation for not being a diligent worker, this story is too good to check out.