James Harden

Biggest question left in training camp: James Harden’s extension


The question is not if James Harden wants to stay in Oklahoma City, he has said many times he wants to be part of this team as it tries to win a ring. The question is not if Oklahoma City wants him back, they know without him they may not be title contenders. The question isn’t if he loves the fans or the fans love him, just look at all the fake beards in the stands at a Thunder game.

No, the question as always is money.

By Oct. 31 the Thunder have to make a decision — offer Harden a max extension (four years, $58 million) and eat the tax that will come in a few years with that; or don’t offer an extension and let him become a restricted free agent next summer where another team (or teams) will make that same max offer to him. Then Thunder can match those offers, but the price is set.

Oklahoma City seems to hope Harden will give them a discount, he doesn’t seem inclined to do that. But the Thunder made their bed — they games Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook max extensions in past years, then reached a four year, $50 million extension with Serge Ibaka this past summer. When they did that, they knew full well what the price — and tax — for Harden would be. Marc Stein at ESPN explains the Thunder’s financial decision this way:

Re-signing Harden to a max extension, then, would come at a debilitating cost. The team already has $70.8 million on the books for 2013-14. Add in a big Harden raise to, say, $13 million, then factor in the projected tax threshold of $70 million, and the league would ding the Thunder with penalties of $28 million during that season. Hmm. Harden salary: $13 million. Resulting tax: $28 million. It’d be like getting one Harden for the price of two.

Stein’s piece gives a false binary choice for Harden of being the next Joe Johnson — the star who demanded the max, left Phoenix for Atlanta and saw his reputation slip — or Manu Ginobili, who took less to win rings and stay in San Antonio. Those are certainly not the only two outcomes.

To me this comes back to the Thunder and their ownership — they chose to move out of Seattle to Oklahoma City, a smaller television market with less potential for local media revenue. They knew the finances of their move. They knew that Harden was a max player and that other teams would line up for him when OKC gave Westbrook and Ibaka their extensions. Thunder management and ownership knew the tax implications that would be coming their way.

The Thunder made their choices, they are not blameless in this. Harden has a right with his career to make his choices, to make as much as he can. The Thunder have their right to decide what they will and will not pay. But neither side gets to say the other side is fully at fault.

The Thunder owners have said they would pay the tax in the past. We’ll see if they really meant it. And while Harden is under no obligation to take less (the Thunder’s other stars didn’t) it also might be the wise move for his career.

By the Oct. 31 extension deadline we will have answers. And if the answer is no extension, there will be a lot more questions. Starting with: Should the Thunder trade Harden and get something for him while they can?

Looks like Donovan to keep Andre Roberson, Steven Adams as starters

Los Angeles Clippers v Oklahoma City Thunder
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Billy Donovan was given the head coaching job in Oklahoma City to bring their offense into modern times — and it seems to be working, Russell Westbrook said he feels a lot more space in the system.

But if the Thunder are going to contend for a title, they need a top 10 defense as well — and to do that Donovan is going to keep a Scott Brooks move and continue to start  Andre Roberson and Steven Adams. Check out the starting lineup for their first preseason game Wednesday.

There also was this report via Anthony Slater in the Oklahoman yesterday about a scrimmage at practice.

Durant, Russell Westbrook, Serge Ibaka and Andre Roberson all started for the White team. Nick Collison joined them, but that was only because Steven Adams sat out with back soreness….

Donovan said the teams weren’t split by accident. That’s how they’ve been divided in practice. So at this point, it seems Roberson is this team’s starting shooting guard and Adams is the team’s starting center.

This is the smart move. Last season the lineup of Westbrook, Roberson, Durant, Ibaka and Adams was +13.4 points per 100 possessions over their opponents. Roberson and Adams are there for defense — neither brings much offensive game to the floor, but when you have Westbrook and Durant and only one ball between them, you don’t need more offensive threats. You’re going to get plenty of points.

If they can just stay healthy, Oklahoma City is a team to be feared.

Knicks’ legend Harry Gallatin passes away at age 88

Harry Gallatin
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The Hall of Fame player behind the original iron man streak is with us no more.

Knicks’ legend Harry Gallatin passes away at age 88, the team confirmed Wednesday.

Gallatin led the Knicks of the late 1940s and into the 1950s, when he set a then record playing in 610 consecutive games. Nicknamed “The Horse,” he was a beast on the boards who averaged 15.3 rebounds a game one season and averaged 11.9 boards and 13 points per game over the course of his 10-year career. He’s still fourth all time in total rebounds in Knicks franchise history.

Gallatin was a seven-time All-Star and twice All-NBA selection. After his playing days, he spent many years as the athletic director at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.