Seattle

Seattle NBA arena moves forward but Mariners still oppose

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The Seattle Mariners do not come off smelling good in this situation. Even when their representatives try to explain themselves.

Plans for a new arena in Seattle continue to move forward with both the city and county councils expected to approve a Memorandum of Understanding with the developer next Monday. Developer Chris Hansen has taken the project to the point it’s all but a done deal — the financing is in place — and even NBA Commissioner David Stern was speaking well of it when asked at a press conference before one of the NBA preseason games in Europe.

“The answer is there seem to be plans moving along for a new arena in Seattle,” Stern said. “There was general agreement in the past that Seattle needed a new arena. It would be my hope that within the timeframe that you mentioned five years that if everything works out perfectly, there would be a new arena and a new team in Seattle. That’s always, for the NBA board of governors, but I know that many governors are favorably inclined.”

But there is still opposition to the arena planned in the South Downtown area of Seattle.

By the Mariners. The baseball team. Which is racking up bad will among Seattle sports fans with said opposition.

So Crosscut gave the Mariners’ CEO Howard Lincoln a chance to explain why they oppose a new arena in the same neighborhood as their own Safeco Field — the reasons are parking and traffic.

“We’ve looked at NBA and NHL master schedules. Depending on playoffs, you’d typically have six to 12 conflicts annually if both teams were here and made the playoffs. Roughly half the teams in each sport make the playoffs, so that would occur roughly half the time. We think it would be on average three regular season games and three playoff games for each sport….

“The difficulty is other events. The traditional wisdom on arenas is that you need 200-plus events to be successful; Chris Hansen has been saying 200-250 events a year. It’s the concerts, circuses, ice shows, trade shows and everything else that is typical to most arenas that’s the biggest problem. As many as a third to a half of our games can be conflicted. You start to get in a fight every Friday night with a concert versus a ballgame…

“But at the end of the day, (Hansen) wants the arena at the end of our parking garage, and we don’t think it will work. There’s nothing to negotiate.”

So their concern is the area will become too popular and that will keep people away? The Mariners are not the only ones with concerns, the Port of Seattle is nearby and is concerned about area traffic congesting their cargo flow. My first thought is that now is the time this can be worked out. There has to be mitigation.

From where I stand as a fan, I want more things — arenas, restaurants, bars, shops theaters — in one area. While you need parking and flow, you want more attractions in an area because people are drawn to it. From personal experience, is it harder to get to Staples Center for a Clippers game the night there is some big event at the nearby Nokia Theater or at nearby USC? Yes. But those nights also have the best energy around the arena. Those are the nights people go out before or after the game, enjoy the experience then think “we should do that again.”

Plus, if you’re providing people a good product, people will come to see it. That may be the Mariners biggest problem.

76ers’ No. 1 pick Ben Simmons out for season

TARRYTOWN, NEW YORK - AUGUST 07:  Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers poses for a portrait during the 2016 NBA Rookie Photoshoot at Madison Square Garden Training Center on August 7, 2016 in Tarrytown, New York. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2016 NBAE  (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
Nick Laham/Getty Images
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76ers CEO Scott O’Neil guaranteed No. 1 pick Ben Simmons would play this season. Just about a week ago, Philadelphia coach Brett Brown said he expected Simmons to play this season.

But with rumor after rumor — the latest report saying his injured right foot hadn’t fully healed, even though he had participated in drills — indicating Simmons could miss the entire year, the 76ers accepted this undesirable fate.

Corey Seidman of CSN Philly:

Ben Simmons is officially out for the season, Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said Friday.

Simmons had a CT scan on his injured right foot Thursday in New York which showed that the foot is not yet fully healed.

He’ll have another scan in about a month, Colangelo said.

“I have always known that there was a desire to get him back on the court when healthy,” Colangelo said. “We’ve always anticipated there would be an opportunity for him to play, hopefully this season.

“But there was always the outside chance that it didn’t happen because there wasn’t complete and full healing. And we weren’t going to put Ben Simmons in a place where he was (susceptible) to a re-fracture.

“There are genetic things that change the healing patterns of people. So if everybody had done their research and saw that most Jones fractures took 3 to 4 months, great. But it’s not 3 to 4 months in every case, it’s 3 to 4 months in most cases.”

“He’s heartbroken. He wants to play. He wants to be out there. It’s eating him alive, I’m sure.”

Simmons follows Nerlens Noel and Joel Embiid as high first-round picks to miss their entire first professional season with the 76ers. If it weren’t for Embiid’s emergence this season, this would be an even more bitter pill to swallow for Philadelphia fans fixated on immediate on-court gains.

But Embiid has provided more than enough reason for optimism, though he’s also hurt now (just not nearly as severely).

Long-term, the 76ers must figure out how Embiid and Simmons mesh and try to develop them together. We know Embiid works well with a stretch four, but what about a dynamic passing power forward like Simmons — or a tall point guard, if that’s what Simmons become? This injury delays answering those questions.

It also raises questions about Simmons — his ability to avoid and recover from injuries. Colangelo’s comments about Simmons’ genetics are particularly eyebrow-raising.

Likewise, there should be questions about the 76ers’ handling of their players’ health. How could Simmons return to on-court work before fully healed?

Philadelphia, at various points, has tried to accelerate its rise. But properly rebuilding takes time and care. At times like this, the 76ers must remember to trust The Process.

Paul Pierce shoots back at Warriors: ‘3-1 lead oops’

Los Angeles Clippers forward Paul Pierce (34) in the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
AP Photo/David Zalubowski
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Draymond Green was harsh in trash-talking Paul Pierce last night.

Pierce and the Clippers couldn’t shut up Green on the court, as the Warriors won. But on Twitter?

Pierce responded there:

Pierce has repeatedly taken shots at the Warriors, particularly Kevin Durant. I’m not going to complain about trash-talking, but I can also see why Green would tire of this — and even try crushing Pierce last night.

But there’s apparently no way to silence Pierce.

Ty Lawson cleverly runs down clock in Kings’ win over Nuggets (video)

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The Kings traded DeMarcus Cousins for two key reasons:

  • They wanted to change their culture, and they thought jettisoning the combustible Cousins would do that.
  • They wanted to avoid conveying a top-10-protected first-round pick to the Bulls this year, which required getting a little worse in the short term.

But what if they did the former so well, it disrupts the latter?

Sacramento played with enthusiasm and savvy in a 116-100 win over the Nuggets last night. The most clever play came from Ty Lawson.

With the Kings trying to preserve a 109-94 lead with 2:38 left, Lawson took an inbound pass following a Denver basket and let the ball roll/lie on the court for 22 seconds before picking it up.

The game clock didn’t stop because the game wasn’t in the final two minutes. Neither the shot clock nor the eight-second count started because no team possessed the ball.

Denver had an extremely slim chance at erasing a 15-point with 2:38 left, but Lawson reduced those odds considerably. Eventually, Jameer Nelson — who failed for far too long to press Lawson out of this tactic — committed a frustration foul after his own basket.

Stephen Curry caps Warriors’ 50-point quarter with incredible buzzer-beating 3 (video)

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Why was Stephen Curry messing around with all that dribbling? Did he realize how little time was left?

Oh, yeah.

Curry and the Warriors knew exactly what they were doing in the third quarter against the Clippers last night.

Curry’s 3-pointer capped a 50-point quarter — just the third 50-point quarter in the last 25 years. The 2010-11 Pacers scored 54 in a quarter against the Nuggets, and the 2013-14 Lakers (!) scored 51 in a quarter against the Knickers (oh).

Golden State trailed by 12 at halftime, but flipped that into a 12-point lead entering the third quarter. The Warriors didn’t look back in a 123-113 win, but we’ll look back and enjoy all that third-quarter shot-making: