Do the Jazz need to ‘fix’ Al Jefferson and if so, how do they do it?

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In a very thorough and open-minded post on the Jazz Blog SLCDunk, they’ve reached a conclusion that Al Jefferson is not nearly the player that Jazz fans want him to be or the organization needs him to be. This is going to run counter to what a lot of people outside of SLC tend to think about Jefferson, because, well, he’s a really good basketball player and we’re not pinning 35% of our hopes and dreams on him. (The other percentage is made of Paul Millsap 25%, Gordon Hayward, inexplicably, 20%, and Derrick Favors 20%.) The basic concept is that Jefferson’s defense is allegedly so bad, that he would need to be an elite scorer to justify his minutes and usage. So if that’s the case, how do you get him to elite scoring position without just having him throw the ball at the rim a bunch while Paul Millsap studies free agency?

 

From SLCDunk.com:

If we’re serious about playing Big Al big minutes in a contract year, and we’re serious about having him deserve those minutes, he’s going to have to be an Elite scorer.

And he CAN be an elite scorer if he: goes to the line more, and takes more shots where he makes them from.

It’s almost too simple.

To fix Big Al he needs to do more of what he’s good at. I could care less that he improved his fg% from 16 feet by 7%. He shot 68 fg% at the rim last year. He only shot there 4.1 times a game. That’s the problem on offense.

via NBA Elite Scoring, and being constructive about Utah Jazz Center Al Jefferson – SLC Dunk.

So the idea that’s presented is that Jefferson needs to get the ball on the cut, off the pick and roll, in simple dump-offs for quick scores, essentially making him a “quick-strike scorer” rather than someone you just feed in the post and let him do his thing, because what winds up happening is that he shoots from further out where he’s less efficient. That’s bad. It’s a weird kind of idea. Can you have someone who is your primary option on offense but who isn’t given the ball to create the shot he’s comfortable with and instead merely charged with finishing simple plays?

And that’s kind of the underlying tone of the piece, that this entire exercise doesn’t make sense, which is why Jefferson has to go as the Jazz have more and more decisions to make about their frontcourt in the future.

Now a few issues with this. One, I’m not willing to set sail on the Al Jefferson defense train of Hope yet. Big men tend to reach their fullest defensive potential much later than any other types of players. I’m not saying Jefferson’s going to morph into Serge Ibaka, but he can get to a point where he’s passable. In fact, the post mentions Dirk Nowitzki who is just fine in the way that Rick Carlisle has designed his defense. Second, it’s not like we haven’t seen Jefferson with the ability to score efficiently in the post. In truth, if you told me there’s a minute left in the game and one guy has to get the ball for the Jazz in a close game, I’m going with feeding Jefferson in the post. Guy’s money in the clutch, and I mean that in the scientific sense of the term.

But the blog is right in that Jefferson needs to become an elite scorer, and that means efficiency. But instead of trying to find him different spots or create a new model for an elite scorer, essentially extrapolating Tyson Chandler to 25 shots per game, instead the offense needs to improve so that doubles can’t come, and Jefferson can take advantage of mismatches. From there, it’s mostly a matter of Jefferson just… doing it. Sadly, no one can really control that, perhaps not even Jefferson, and that’s what makes it such a boggle for the Jazz.

I’m going to keep telling you, the Jazz are one of the most fascinating stories this season. They could detonate and hold a firesale, make the playoffs and go on a surprising run, anything. It’s a complex and nuanced situation that deserves your attention.

Stephen Curry says he’d want in on potential Panthers ownership

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The Carolina Panthers are up for sale. Owner Jerry Richardson said he would sell the team late on Sunday following an announcement by the NFL that Richardson was under investigation for “workplace misconduct”. The NFL’s investigation and Richardson’s decision to sell was preceded by a report from SI saying Richardson had paid out settlements amid sexual harassment and racial slur claims.

Enter Sean Combs and Stephen Curry.

Combs — that’s Diddy, you to and me — has previously voiced his interest in being involved with the NFL, and after seeing that Richardson would be selling the team, jumped at the chance to boost his profile. Combs tweeted that he wanted to buy the team, and that’s when Curry joined in.

Via Twitter:

Naturally, Curry is from Charlotte and went to both high school and eventually college in the area, playing at Davidson. He’s an avid Panthers fan and has been on the sideline for the team publicly many times over the years.

Curry being part of an ownership group for the Panthers would be pretty wild. Perhaps Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan would like to join in? It seems like they would have the liquidity and credit availability between the three of them to get the team.

Then again, the asking price for the Panthers could be north of $2 billion. The last team to be sold was the Buffalo Bills in 2014 for $1.4 billion. In September, Forbes released a valuation for the Panthers that put them at $2.3 billion.

Might need to get a few others involved in this one.

Watch Raptors fans give Vince Carter a standing ovation in Toronto (VIDEO)

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Vince Carter is 40 years old and playing in what could possibly be his final NBA season. The Sacramento Kings guard started his career with the Toronto Raptors, and on Sunday he played what could possibly be his final game at the Air Canada Centre.

And so, when Carter was subbed out late in the fourth quarter on Sunday, the folks in Toronto did what came naturally: they cheered.

The whole thing was pretty great to watch, and a real testament to how Carter is viewed by fans in Toronto.

Via Twitter:

Carter scored just four points in 25 minutes for Sacramento, going 2-of-5 from the field while adding three blocks, two assists, a rebound and a steal.

The Raptors got the win over the Kings, 108-93.

Report: Isaiah Thomas looking at first week of January for return to Cavs

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Just when we though Isaiah Thomas had fallen off the collective radar of the NBA, he squeaks right back in.

Thomas, who the Cleveland Cavaliers acquired in a trade this summer for Kyrie Irving, has yet to play a game due to a nagging hip injury. That injury caused some back-and-forth squabbling between Cleveland and the Boston Celtics, but things got sorted and the teams went on their way.

Irving has been spectacular of course, helping to lead the Celtics to a record of 25-7 in the absence of Gordon Hayward, good enough for the top slot in the Eastern Conference.

Now, it appears that Thomas is ahead of schedule and will be ready to help the Cavaliers fight for that spot come early January. According to Yahoo! Sports’ Shams Charania, Thomas and Cleveland want him to be playing the first week of the new year.

Via Twitter:

Of course, we’ve heard this before. The team has said this season that Thomas would play in January. Then the line moved and the Cavaliers thought he would play in December. It’s now moved back to January, but reports are more firm as we’re closer to the expected date and Thomas is playing in 4-on-4 drills. The great news is this honed return date seems to directly target the second game of 2018 for the Cavaliers, which is conveniently against the Celtics.

No doubt Thomas will be jonesing to take on his former team, where he certainly would have preferred to stay after a stellar season in 2016-17. Still, Thomas has been in good spirits — he gets to play with LeBron James for goodness sake — and the Jan. 3 game will be one to watch.

If Thomas can’t make it for that January matchup, the next opportunity he will have to beat Boston will be on Feb. 11.

DeMarcus Cousins thinks refs are giving him techs off reputation alone

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New Orleans Pelicans big man DeMarcus Cousins is a fiery personality on the court, often arguing foul calls at length despite no official in NBA history reversing a call directly after player complaint.

Crafty veterans — your LeBron Jameses and your Chris Pauls — slowly and pointedly chatter with officials as a means to influence their subconscious leaning on calls (and to protect them against earning techs when they do decide to straight up yell at refs).

Cousins hasn’t used that kind of angling to success in his career, instead going hard at referees with some consistency. Cousins has tried to change that approach this season, but instead has found that his prior actions have earned him a reputation the Pelicans forward believes doesn’t befit his actions in 2017-18.

Speaking to The Undefeated’s Marc Spears, Cousins said that despite letting more calls go and changing his candor, NBA refs are not responding proportionately.

Via The Undefeated:

I am going out of my way. I am going over and beyond,” Cousins said. “I am coming in saying, ‘We can’t do this, this and this …’ Even calls I know I should be arguing, I’m letting go. And they’re still like … it’s a one-sided thing. Everything is changing from one end. But with them, it’s like, ‘We are not letting go of the past. You are who you are. You’re getting a tech.’

“So, when it comes to me getting a tech for saying, ‘Good call, referee …,’ vets and coaches tell me to butter them up. Switch it up a little bit. Do a little reverse psychology. Tell them it’s a good call. And you still getting a tech for it? They’re not trying to make it work. They’re stuck in their ways, and it is so obvious.”

Cousins added that he believes foes are taking advantage of his troubles.

“Now it’s to the point where teams are saying, ‘Yeah, just go over there and beat the s— out of him.’ I don’t get calls, and I’m not protected like other players are,” he said.

It’s interesting to see that Cousins has at least tried to change things up, and indeed acknowledges that he should be trying to work with the officials rather than antagonize them.

Still, we’re not sure what the tone of his “good call” comments are toward the refs. Are they sarcastic? Or are they contrite? You can see how one might earn Cousins a tech from an official — who seem to be particularly sensitive this season — and the other might endear you to them.