USA v Spain - Men's Exhibition Game

USA sends golden message to Spain with 22-point win


This was not the gold medal game, nothing was really at stake in Tuesday night’s exhibition in Barcelona. Spain did not put everything they had into this one — for starters, Marc Gasol did not even play.

Nonetheless, the message the USA sent in the final three quarters of this rout — that their speed and athleticism can be overwhelming, especially when the outside shots are falling — was received. Loud and clear.

Team USA beat Spain 100-78 in a game that was both a rematch of the 2008 Olympic gold medal game from Beijing and a likely preview of the gold medal game from London.

And if there is a rematch in London, you can expect a better effort from Spain. The question is, would it really be enough?

Spain certainly started out the game getting their way. They slowed the game down and contested the USA’s jumpers in the half court, then on offense pounded the ball inside. Pau Gasol got two quick fouls on Tyson Chandler. Meanwhile, Jose Calderon carved into the USA’s defense and when the help came nobody on the USA helped-the-helper. The result was Serge Ibaka putting on a dunking exhibition and getting 16 first half points (he scored none in the second half).

Team USA is undersized and has predicated their defense on speed and pressure. Which is fine, but that requires some practice and communication, and certainly the communication was lacking early.

But at the end of the first quarter, things started to change for a couple reasons. One, the USA got some stops and that let them increase the tempo.

The other was Carmelo Anthony.

He hit seemingly everything he put up once he came in off the bench, ending with 23 first half points. He was raining threes (five in the first half), and he was doing it getting open working off the ball in a way Mike D’Antoni wanted him to but Carmelo wouldn’t really do for him in New York. ‘Melo finished with 27 points on 15 shots to lead Team USA.

They pushed out to a 48-40 halftime lead.

The second half saw some smart adjustments by Mike Krzyzewski. For one, they ran some early LeBron James/Kevin Durant pick and roll. Which is about the most unstoppable thing on the planet. Team USA also was making the extra pass — Kobe Bryant made the extra pass on the perimeter to Durant for a three, then a couple possessions later tried to post up then passed out of the double to Durant for another good look (Durant was fouled).

LeBron helped take over in second half, finished with 25 points on 15 shots. The USA’s defensive rotations were a lot sharper in the second half. And while Spain made a run at one point the game was never in serious doubt from near the end of the second quarter on.

Pau Gasol had 19 points to lead Spain. Hopefully Lakers coach Mike Brown was watching and noticed that Gasol is very effective in the low post. You don’t have to just stick him at the elbow or use him as a glorified stretch four.

Spain, as they showed at the start of the game, can play better. They have playmakers that can cause the USA’s defense problems and without Marc Gasol they were lacking some of their skill and size.

But they cannot matchup with the speed, the athleticism the USA puts out there. If the USA is not draining threes maybe Spain can close the gap. And anything can happen in a one-game playoff. But it was hard to watch this game and think that the USA, when focused, is going to be nearly impossible to beat in London.

The USA opens its gold medal defense on Sunday against France.

Dwyane Wade serious as mentor, teaching Justise Winslow post moves

Third day of Miami Heat camp 10/1/2015
1 Comment

Dwyane Wade has earned his status as an elder statesman, the E.F. Hutton kind of veteran who speaks and everybody listens.

Rookie Justise Winslow is listening.

Winslow (who should have gone higher in this draft) is a perfect fit for the Heat and he’s going to be part of their rotation off the bench from the start of the season (along with Josh McRoberts and Amare Stoudemire). Wade has already fully stepped into the mentor role with Winslow working with him on post moves, reports Jason Lieser at the Palm Beach Post.

“As his career develops, hopefully he’s able to do multiple things on the floor, but right now there’s gonna be certain things (Erik Spoelstra) wants him to do, and some of those things I’m good at,” Wade said. “I’m just passing down knowledge to someone who I think could be good at things that I have strengths at. It’s gonna take a while, but if he figures it out at 21, he’s ahead of the curve. I figured it out at like 27.

“All of us are where we’re at because someone before us helped us. They helped by letting us sit there and watch film with them or having conversations with them. If he’s a student of it and he really wants to know, I’m a pretty decent teacher in certain areas.”

This is what you want out of a veteran leader and some of the young teams out there have done an excellent job adding this kind of mentor — Kevin Garnett in Minnesota may be the best example. Someone who can pass on his wisdom and show the team’s young players how to be a professional and win in the NBA.

It’s a little different for Winslow, he and the Heat are more in a win-now mode, but he should be able to contribute to that.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)

Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.