Kobe Bryant opens up about how rape charges changed him

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It is the fork in the road for the public perception of Kobe Bryant.

Back in 2003 he was charged with sexual assault of a hotel employee in Eagle, Colorado (where he had been for knee surgery). Kobe admitted infidelity in his marriage but denied this was a sexual assault. Eventually the charges were dismissed (it never went to full trial).

Irrespective of the court result, this changed how many people thought of Kobe and colors his image to this day. He lost numerous endorsements. It changed how he and Nike marketed the Kobe brand — he stared in a “hate me but respect my game” series of ads with Nike and publicly embraced the driven side of his personality in a way he had not before. He was fine with being everyone’s villan (outside of Los Angeles, where he was always largely supported).

His popularity eventually came around as people did respect his game, and after a couple of titles without Shaquille O’Neal Kobe is now the biggest international star the NBA has. His fame transcends basketball. He is an icon of the sport, regardless of what people think of him.

The Colorado experience changed Kobe as a person, too.

Kobe doesn’t often speak of those times but he did in a fantastic interview on Yahoo with Graham Bensinger, part of the In Depth series. (We will have other parts of the interview later today, but go check it out.)

“The challenge is who you are as a person, not only individually but as a family….” Bryant said. “There’s times where it just seems like days are just endless, like this is never going to end. This feeling, this dark time is just never going to be over. Once you go through something like that, you can’t help but be different. You can’t help but have a better sense of who you are.”

What were the lessons?

“As a person it just really teaches you how to let go and how to trust and not try to control everything. And that decreases your stress level ten-fold,” Kobe said.

Through it all, Bryant kept playing, flying back to Los Angeles just before game time and performing well for the Lakers. There were calls in some quarters for Kobe to stop playing but he said he needed that escape.

“I’m not going to stop playing,” Kobe said. “I’m not just because you guys think I should stop playing, just because you guys think that I won’t perform as well. I’m going to show you. Truthfully, it was stress release for me.”

Kobe said he has spoken with Ray Lewis, the superstar NFL linebacker who faced murder charges (which were dismissed).

“Other players can’t relate to that sort of stuff, to that type of pressure,” Bryant said. “That’s real pressure. That’s life pressure. It’s not hitting the game winning shot. If you make it, you win. If you miss it – no. That’s not pressure.”

Kevin Durant brings fan to tears with autographed shoes (video)

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Kevin Durant has become a villain to many.

Clearly not to this Warriors fan, though.

Carmelo Anthony leaves without speaking to media, will probably get fined

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Lately, Carmelo Anthony has parsed whether the Thunder are frustrated or angry and said he’s going through the roughest stretch of his career.

It didn’t get any better last night.

Anthony scored 11 points on 12 shots with three turnovers, and Oklahoma City got outscored by 21 points with him on the floor in a home loss to the Hornets. The Thunder have now lost two of three, falling to the lowly Nets and Hornets and needing overtime to beat the freefalling Grizzlies.

Royce Young of ESPN:

Anthony today:

I’m sorry. My bad. I had a FaceTime session with my son, so I skipped out on you guys yesterday. I apologize. It’s true, though. That’s true. It’s true. He had a school night.

The NBA’s media-access rules state: “All players must be available to the media for a minimum of five to 10 minutes during the postgame media access period.” It’s been a while since someone got punished for violating the policy, but Kevin Garnett was fined $25,000 for not speaking to the media after Game 7 of the 2012 Eastern Conference finals.

I’m sympathetic to Anthony wanting to speak to his son, who’s still in New York. But the league tends not to take these personal concerns into consideration, which is probably for the best. There’s a rule. Anthony violated it. Assessing which personal calls should supersede the rule is a can of worms not worth opening. Besides, Anthony probably could have returned to the locker room for an interview after concluding the call.

Anthony earns a lot of money. If he wanted to risk a $25,000 fine to speak with his son, I have absolutely no problem with that. But that’s probably the choice he made.

In my experience, Anthony has been forthright with the media. He spent years as the face of the Knicks, dutifully answering for problems created by James Dolan and Phil Jackson. Because he was available nearly daily while his superiors avoided interviews, Anthony was the grilled by the New York media.

I bet he expected a reprieve in Oklahoma City. Instead, the spotlight has shined on him as a problem with the underwhelming Thunder.

It’s understandable he’d rather talk to his son than reporters. But it’s also understandable the NBA wants to promote its business through the media, and the league has power to enforce its rules.

Grizzlies fan absolutely owns kids halftime scrimmage (video)

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The Grizzlies lost for the 15th time in their last 16 games, a 25-point drubbing at home against the Heat, last night.

But it wasn’t all doom and gloom in Memphis.

This young fan – while playing in the halftime scrimmage – stopped his dribble, stepped on the ball, whipped off his youth jersey to reveal a Marc Gasol jersey, flexed, re-started his dribbled then drove for a basket.

Matt Ellentuck of SB Nation:

The Grizzlies don’t deserve this hero.

DeMarcus Cousins pushes Trevor Ariza after whistle, gets technical foul (video)

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For better or worse, DeMarcus Cousins is moody.

Just after getting dunked on by Clint Capela, Cousins showed his frustration by pushing Trevor Ariza after a whistle. The Pelicans center got his NBA-leading ninth technical foul – automatic suspension triggered at No. 16 – but I’m surprised this didn’t escalate beyond just that.