Knicks do not match offer, Landry Fields is a Raptor

18 Comments

The Toronto Raptors have a new starting swingman. Well, at least until Terrence Ross takes his job away.

The Knicks have chosen not to match the three-year, $18.7 million offer sheet Landry Fields signed with Toronto, reports Alan Hahn of the MSG Network. Which means Fields will be Raptor next season. It was speculated the Raptors made the offer just to mess with the Nets pursuit of Steve Nash (who went to the Lakers in a move that was a surprise to everyone), but now they got him and that contract.

Fields is not a great fit for the direction the Knicks are going. He played well in New York when Raymond Felton was running the pick-and-role with Amare Stoudemire. However, when the Knicks offense became more Carmelo Anthony based Fields was on the way out.

Fields will give Toronto a solid two-way player who can soak up more than 25 minutes a night. He played his best in New York next to a strong point guard and the Raptors have Kyle Lowry.  He could give more than the 8.8 points per game he averaged last year.

Fields makes about $5 million the first couple years of his deal but that jumps way up in the third year. Hence the “poison pill” part of the deal.

But now the Raptors have to swallow that pill.

Report: From Lakers (+$115 million) to Pistons (-$45 million), NBA teams’ incomes vary widely

AP Photo/Carlos Osorio
Leave a comment

seyIn 2011, the NBA said 23 teams lost money. A lockout followed, and the players relinquished a significant share of Basketball Related Income to the owners.

In 2014, there was still noise about nine teams losing money. The owners and players struck a deal on a new Collective Bargaining Agreement without another work stoppage just as new national TV contracts were kicking in, signs of prosperity.

Yet, the same issues persist.

Zach Lowe and Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

Despite a flood of new national television cash, 14 of the NBA’s 30 teams lost money last season before collecting revenue-sharing payouts, and nine finished in the red even after accounting for those payments, according to confidential NBA financial records obtained by ESPN.com.

I highly recommend reading Windhorst’s and Lowe’s piece in full. It provides a fascinating breakdown of these numbers from a variety of perspectives.

It can be tough to evaluate these from afar.

The Pistons’ (Tom Gores) and Nets’ owners (Mikhail Prokhorov) own the arenas where their teams played last season. Those buildings can draw a lot of revenue from concerts and other events that isn’t included in the basketball-operations figures seen here.

The Rockets just sold for a record $2.2 billion, and it’s not just because they’re one of the few profitable teams. Sale prices have generally exceeded Forbes valuations lately.

Market size clearly matters, especially as it influences local TV deals. That’s the impetus to the Lakers’ massive profits during a season in which they went 26-56.

But the Lakers need competition, and that’s why they share revenue. There’s value in propping up small-market teams to have a full league of 30 teams. How much value? That’s the ongoing debate.

Maybe the NBA has gone too far toward small markets. Every franchise relocation in the last three decades has put a team in a small market – Oklahoma City, New Orleans and Memphis. That might be finally catching up to the league.

That’s why another team moving or even expansion is being discussed again. Expansion could bring quick cash to the several teams losing it. But it’d also dilute revenue long-term.

These are thorny problems, ones teams have millions of reasons to keep debating.

Joel Embiid clowns Kevin Durant with #BurnerTwitter joke

Kevin Winter/Getty Images
4 Comments

Kevin Durant sure looks like someone who has a secret Twitter account he uses to argue on behalf of himself.

It also appears Durant might have a secret Instagram account. His brother tagged a photo of the Warriors star with the account “quiresultan,” not Durant’s official account (“kevindurant”). Turns out, “quiresultan” has spent a fair amount of time insulting random commenters who bash Durant. Shortly after that made the rounds, “quiresultan” changed its name to “shanghainoon12345.”

Will Durant get a pass for this questionable online behavior?

Not from 76ers center Joel Embiid:

It’s no surprise Durant is the butt of the joke. But from a fellow NBA player? That’s harsher than I expected.

Three questions the Minnesota Timberwolves must answer this season

AP
1 Comment

The NBC/ProBasketballTalk season previews will ask the questions each of the 30 NBA teams must answer to make their season a success. We are looking at one team a day until the start of the season, and it begins with a look back at the team’s offseason moves.

Last Season:
31-51, missed the playoffs.

I know what you did last summer: A whole lot. Jimmy Butler, Taj Gibson, Jeff Teague, and Jamal Crawford are the notable additions from this summer. It was a disappointing end to Ricky Rubio‘s tenure with the franchise, but the swap for the No. 7 pick in the draft to the Bulls brought over one of head coach Tom Thibodeau’s favorite former players from Chicago. Add on Gibson, Teague, and a still-able-to-score Crawford and the Wolves roster looks markedly better than it has in years past.

THREE QUESTIONS THE TIMBERWOLVES MUST ANSWER:

1) What will the play look like between Jimmy Butler and Andrew Wiggins? Wiggins played 93% of his minutes at SF in his first year under Thibodeau last season. Meanwhile, Butler played most of his minutes under Thibodeau as a shooting guard. That means the two will be on the floor together, and it will be interesting to see how they play off of each other. Wiggins clearly made a move to try to be a better 3-point shooter last season, and if that continues there could be a real benefit as Butler works as the second ball handler in the pick-and-roll.

That of course is the hope, but as we’ve seen in other circumstances — Al-Farouq Aminu in Portland — when the 3-point shooting of players strongly rises and then dips again they can become a liability. It’s easy to imagine Wiggins clogging the interior of the arc when Butler has the ball and vice versa, with some serious kinks to potentially work out.

2) What exactly are they going to do with Jamal Crawford? Thibodeau typically hasn’t had players like Crawford during his tenure as a head coach, save for perhaps Nate Robinson in 2012-13 with Chicago. Crawford has 17 years of experience in this league, and although he has slowed down a little bit, he is still an excellent ball handler and streaky scorer.

Crawford should fit that bench scorer role for Minny, and even if Thibodeau does play his starters a thousand minutes a game you can be sure that they will still need the veteran presence of Crawford. The year that Robinson played for Thibodeau he shot 40% from three-point range, and perhaps that could be the role that Crawford slots into here. If there is one offseason acquisition that doesn’t quite fit in for the Timberwolves, Crawford does seem to be it. He has a real potential to get lost in the mix. That, or it could go the other direction and they might need to rely on him as a ball handler off the bench more than they would like. I can see both happening.

3) Can they find a groove to keep their head above water in the playoff race in the Western Conference? Set aside the reigning NBA champions in the Golden State Warriors, the Western Conference is still an absolute meatgrinder. So many big name free agents either were traded to or signed with teams out West. Paul Millsap, Brook Lopez, Paul George, Chris Paul to the Rockets, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, and Thabo Sefolosha are all on the list outside of the guys already mentioned in Minnesota.

The NBA League Pass fan has high expectations of the Timberwolves for the upcoming season, especially after adding an MVP candidate like Butler. However, with so many new players in the Western Conference I think we will still have some of the same questions we have had in years prior about the Timberwolves. That is, what is their development path and how soon should we expect their dominance?

Building a super team doesn’t necessarily mean immediate contention — we know that by now. Yes, having players who have played under Thibodeau before might help this team get through some of their growing pains quicker as the year starts. But there also seems to be a huge potential for a slow start out of the Timberwolves and if that happens it could take some of the wind out of their sails as they try to make up for it going into the All-Star break.

Make no bones about it, Minnesota is likely a playoff team out West. That should feel like a win for Timberwolves fans — because it is. However, I think it’ll take some time for them to jell, and if that’s the case they might end up toward the bottom of the seeding with an uphill battle in April.

Jimmer Fredette has signature shoe line in China, and they are outstanding

Getty Images
1 Comment

Jimmer Fredette was the leading scorer in China last season, averaging 37.6 points a night and dropping 73 in one game. He’s big time.

And big time guys get their own shoe lines.

Jimmer got a signature shoe line teaming up with 361 shoes out of China, as ESPN’s Nick DePaula reports.

I’d wear a pair of those on the court. I have no idea what the price point is (they are not on the 361 website yet), but those could sell.

Is Jimmer going to be the new Stephon Marbury of China?