Miami Heat v Orlando Magic

Report: Dwight Howard wants trade to Nets. Again. Oh, and he thinks the Magic blackmailed him.


Dwight Howard has informed the Orlando Magic that he wants a trade out of Orlando to the New Jersey Nets.

Yeah, I know. You’ve heard this before. But now it’s with a new GM! And it’s extra-ridiculous! Let’s get this offseason started!

From ESPN:

Dwight Howard met with new Orlando Magic general manager Rob Hennigan on Friday and told him he wants to be traded to the Brooklyn Nets, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

Howard and Hennigan sat down face to face in Los Angeles, meeting for the first time since Hennigan became Orlando’s GM nearly two weeks ago.

Hennigan was noncommital when Howard told him he wants to be traded to Brooklyn, sources said.

Hennigan did not tell Howard whether he would trade him. His intentions were merely to hear the thoughts of the Magic superstar.

via Sources — Dwight Howard tells Orlando Magic GM he wants trade to Brooklyn Nets – ESPN.

So Howard, after claiming he wanted a trade last winter, then rescinding it, then putting it back out there, then saying he’d stay for another year, then backing out, then finally signing his opt-in, wants out again.

At some point, if you’re the Magic, this isn’t worth it, right? It’s just too big of a headache? Or back ache? Or pain in the backside? I mean, that’s where we’re at, right? It cannot be worth Howard’s considerable production and All-Star play to deal with this nonsense day by day, hour by hour, throwing the organization into constant drama by leaking information to people left and right of this nature. There has to be a point where the Magic are just like “Fine, go. We’ll take MarShon Brooks and a trade exception. Just don’t ever talk to us again.” Because this stuff is clown shoes.

But wait, it gets better!

But since then, he has grown increasingly disgruntled with the organization, even telling people close to him that he feels the Magic blackmailed him into signing the “opt-in” clause.

Howard shared his feelings of being blackmailed by the Magic with the NBA Players Association last week, sources said. He — either himself or through his representatives — approached the union wondering if he might have a legal complaint against the club.

via Sources — Dwight Howard tells Orlando Magic GM he wants trade to Brooklyn Nets – ESPN.

Yup, that’s right. Dwight Howard, after the Magic fell all over himself for the entire year trying to make him happy, after signing Gilbert Arenas and Glen Davis, after firing Otis Smith and Stan Van Gundy, thinks that the Magic blackmailed him into signing an opt-in clause.

This story cannot get crazier. It’s not possible. There is no room for crazy. Go sell crazy somewhere else. The Magic are full-up on crazy. And Amway. But mostly crazy.

So Howard wants out of Orlando and into Brooklyn with Deron Williams. He’s not bending on where he wants to go to give them outs. He’s not quietly sitting out his final year to enter free agency. He’s just causing more of a ruckus and more drama for his team.

Welcome to the team, Rob Hennigan. Have fun with that.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.