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2012 adidas Eurocamp preview

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The NBA’s pre-Draft camp in Chicago, which wrapped up on Friday, is the place where league front-office types get a combine-style look at U.S. college players. The equivalent for international players is adidas Eurocamp, a three-day event which kicks off June 10 in Treviso, Italy.

The camp is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year, and adidas, who has been affiliated with it for the last three, is making sure it remains the premier place for NBA teams to view and interact with international prospects. Houston Rockets director of scouting Artūras Karnišovas is in his first year as the camp’s director, and Minnesota Timberwolves assistant coach Bill Bayno is in his first year as the camp’s coaching director. Kevin McHale will be in attendance to hold a special clinic for bigs, and other familiar basketball names working the camp include Blazers head coach Kaleb Canales, Grizzlies assistant Dave Joerger, and Suns assistant Igor Kokoskov.

Chris Grancio, Head of Global Sports Marketing for adidas, gave me an overview of what the camp is all about, and explained how adidas is doing everything it can to continue to make it a success.

“We’ve really tried to focus on elevating all elements of the program,” he said. “As the official outfitter of the NBA, we’re very well-connected to the league, and we saw it not only as an opportunity, but a responsibility really to look at continuing to elevate and invest in this platform so it became better and better.

“Some specific examples — for us, it’s always about talent. We really focus on every year ensuring that we have the best players coming for the scouts that come over to watch them play. We focus on ensuring that we continue to develop and grow the content, so that the players that do come are getting the best possible basketball experience on the court, and a great experience off it as well. And then the last real objective that we set our eyes on in the recent past and immediate future, is really doing everything in our power to elevate the camp itself so that it becomes a true one-to-one experience compared to the Chicago pre-draft camp, which so many U.S. fans are used to seeing and hearing about.

“We’re also bringing Trajan Langdon over, to help really strengthen the coaching staff’s connection to the players. Trajan’s a little bit more of a younger guy, he had a fantastic career in Europe. He himself is an aspiring coach in the long-term, and it’s a great opportunity to bring somebody in that has a lot of similar, relevant experience to our players, and put him in a role where he can help connect, relate, and communicate with them over the course of the camp.”

The players’ experience seems just as important to adidas as ensuring that the practices, drills, and scrimmages showcasing them remain not only relevant to NBA teams, but consistent with the information they get on prospects from the states.

“We’ve made some big steps over the last year by including BAM (Basic Athletic Measurement) testing, which is the official biometric testing of the NBA,” Grancio said. “They partner with the league at the Chicago pre-draft camp to measure agility, jump height, quickness, and we’ve invested in bringing them into the Eurocamp environment so we can get the exact same metrics and readings off of all of the athletes that are participating. So if you’re a general manager, you can look at statistics that are absolutely identical, measured the same way, and certified by the same group of people to compare an athlete that might be coming from Slovenia, and a kid that’s coming from Kansas.”

In addition to skills testing (and unlike the Chicago camp where it is solely measurement and drill-based), the players have the opportunity to participate in games against one another. Some choose not to, of course, in favor of individual workouts where there is less downside and a player’s unique skill-set can be showcased.

The talent level at the camp, at least in terms of players who might make an immediate NBA impact next season, isn’t nearly as deep as in years past. Only one international player, shooting guard Evan Fournier of France, is projected as a possible late-first-round pick, while just a few others — Tomas Satoransky (combo guard, Czech Republic), Kostantinos Papanikolaou (small forward, Greece), Tornike Shengelia (power froward, Georgia), and Nihad Djedovic (wing, Bosnia) — are projected to possibly be taken in the second round.

As a comparison, last year’s camp had three top-10 2011 NBA draft picks attend — Jonas Valanciunas, Jan Veseley, and Bismack Biyombo. But the amount of NBA-ready talent is always going to fluctuate year over year, so the important thing for adidas is to do what they’ve been doing, which is to continue to put on the premier pre-draft camp for international players.

There are plans in the works to televise portions of the camp in the future, most likely through a partnership with NBATV. In the meantime, keep it here over the next few days as we bring you the latest news from Treviso.

Chauncey Billups explains why not every player wants to go home

Dallas Mavericks v Denver Nuggets
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LeBron James did it and shook up the NBA — he returned home to Cleveland. That has led to fantasies other players want to do the same thing: Kevin Durant back to Washington D.C.; DeMar DeRozan or Russell Westbrook back to Los Angeles; Blake Griffin back to Oklahoma. And the list goes on.

Not every player wants to do it.

Chauncey Billups did. Billups is a Denver guy who returned to play for the Nuggets — and gets his number retired Wednesday night, a much-deserved honor — but in a letter to his young self at the Players’ Tribune Wednesday he explained that going home is fraught with peril.

“But in reality, playing at home as a 23-year-old professional is going to be less blessing and more curse. (There’s perception, again, for you.) It’s as simple as this: you’re just not going to be ready for Denver to be Your City. You’re going to think you’re ready — and they are too — but, trust me, you won’t be. You’re still going to be so young. You’re still going to be hanging out with your boys, doing your old thing. There are going to be those … hometown distractions. And those distractions will add up.”

“And you have to understand, Chaunce: It’s not just that you made it. It’s that your whole neighborhoodis going to feel like they made it. All of Park Hill is going to feel like they made it. And don’t get me wrong — that’s special. But at the wrong age, it can also be tough. It can be a lot to handle. And you’re going to be at that wrong age. You’re not going to be mature enough yet, or developed enough yet, to take on that mix of environments, those responsibilities, that role.

“You’re not going to be ready to lead.”

There are plenty of guys around the NBA who understand those distractions and how those can get in the way of off-season workouts, of time spent shoring up a weakness or developing a new shot, and how during the season they can be another thing that wears the body down.

Some guys can handle it. Some can’t.

Go read the entire letter from Billups. He talks about getting traded from the Celtics his rookie season, about playing for Mike D’Antoni, about how very rarely do veterans want to mentor younger players because they are fighting for the same piece of the pie.  Billups is honest.

And it’s great that Denver is rewarding him as they should.

Did Marcus Thornton steal free throws from Rockets teammate Clint Capela?

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Leandro Barbosa – guarding Marcus Thornton and fighting through a Clint Capela screen – was called for a foul in the first quarter of last night’s Warriors-Rockets game.

Thornton went to the line.

Should he have? Or should Capela have?

Perhaps, Thornton and Barbosa tangled, but it certainly appeared the contact primarily occurred between Barbosa and Capela. It looks like Barbosa tries to ram through Capela.

It also appears Capela thought he drew the foul. Watch him step toward the line before seeing Thornton there and taking his spot along the paint.

So, why would Thornton step in? He’s making 89% of his free throws to Capela’s 40%.

I’m honestly surprised players don’t try this maneuver more often. Refs have so much to keep track of. The worst consequence would be the refs shooing away Thornton and bringing Capela to the line.

Thornton made both free throws, but it didn’t matter. Houston was playing Golden State, which rolled to a victory.

Kanye West apologizes to Michael Jordan

performs at the 2015 iHeartRadio Music Festival at MGM Grand Garden Arena on September 18, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
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Kanye West – when he isn’t tweeting to invalidate the claims of dozens of women on nothing more than his own suppositions – is tweeting to Michael Jordan

Mark Parker is CEO of Nike, a company that collaborated with West on the Air Yeezy before an unhappy West bolted for Adidas. Jordan, of course, is a Nike ally and known for the Jumpman logo on his brand.

That’s why Kanye rapped in “Facts:”

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

We bring you the important news.

(hat tip: Jovan Buha of Fox Sports)

Report: Kobe Bryant once wanted Lakers to trade him to defending champs or 60-win team

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 29:  Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers drives to the basket past Tim Duncan #21 of the San Antonio Spurs in Game Five of the Western Conference Finals during the 2008 NBA Playoffs on May 29, 2008 at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California.  The Lakers won 100-92.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant has taken plenty of criticism for his reported interest in signing with the Warriors.

Don’t chase a ring by just bolting for the best team. Build up your own team. Kobe Bryant would never do that.

Well…

Kobe Bryant requested a trade from the Lakers in 2007 – when the Cavaliers tried trading everyone but LeBron James for him – and the Bulls were Kobe’s top choice. Kobe had a no-trade clause, so he had some power to choose his next team. The rest of his list?

Kobe, via Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

It was Chicago, San Antonio (or) Phoenix.

The Spurs were reigning NBA champions, and the Suns were coming off a 61-win season. These teams were the class of the league.

They also had strong offensive identities – Gregg Popovich’s ball-movement-happy system in San Antonio and Mike D’Antoni’s up-tempo attack in Phoenix. How would Kobe have fit? Now, that’s a great what-if – especially because both teams had the assets to create intriguing trade packages.

The Spurs could’ve built an offer around Tony Parker and/or Manu Ginobili, the Suns around Shawn Marion and/or Amar’e Stoudemire. Could you imagine Kobe and Tim Duncan or Kobe and Steve Nash in 2007? It wouldn’t have been anything like the over-the-hill version we saw in Los Angeles a few years later.

Of course, Kobe stuck with the Lakers, who traded for Pau Gasol and won a couple more titles. Kobe led them to those championships, and he deserves credit for staying the course.

But, no matter what Durant decides this summer, remember all players consider as many options as they have in front of them. There’s nothing wrong with someone leaving a job for a better one when he has the ability to do so.

Even Kobe – a self-declared “Laker for life” – tried to do it.