Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and Chris Bosh react following Wade's game winning shot against the Indiana Pacers during overtime of their NBA basketball game in Miami

Heat-Celtics Game 5: Bosh will be the difference, not Rondo

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No doubt, Rajon Rondo has been fantastic against the Heat in the Eastern Conference finals. He had a 44-point game, he dropped 15 and 15 on Miami in Game 4 and led Boston to even the series. For Celtics fans wanting to be convinced he was the bridge to a strong future, he has been that and more.

But Boston’s offense has not been dominant in this series — they averaged 93.9 points per 100 possessions against the Heat last game (worse than every team’s regular-season average save the Bobcats) and scored just 28 points in the second half. They won that game because of their defense.

And that’s why Chris Bosh will be the story of Game 5 — all signs point to him playing and he rapidly improves everything the Heat do on offense. He may be rusty to start, but just his presence changes things. Miami is back home and will put up plenty of points in Game 5, numbers Boston will be hard pressed to match.

No matter what my NBC Sports Network colleagues think, Bosh is the key, not Rondo to Game 5.

(UPDATE: Bosh might have more on his mind than just basketball, with the news out that a masseuse died at his house.)

It’s been obvious all series — when Kevin Garnett is off the floor suddenly LeBron James and Dwyane Wade are on an open highway to the rim. And not some East Coast toll road either, this is a California six-lane super highway. Nobody gets in their way and the Heat make runs. Garnett has been the guy at the heart of keeping Wade in check (well, that and Wade’s knee).

However, Garnett cannot help off Bosh the same way he helps off Udonis Haslem or any of the other Heat big men — Bosh will knock down the shot and make him pay. Garnett and the other Celtics big men will have much tougher decisions to make on help rotations.

Don’t just take my word for it.

“(Bosh) helps (the Heat), because all the trapping we’re doing is harder because he stretches the floor,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said in a Monday press conference. “He’s long. We can close out on the ball and get a hand on the ball (when Battier or Haslem shoot). You can’t do that with Bosh. It will be more difficult.”

Right now, Wade or LeBron come off the high pick and Boston shows no respect to the roll man — that changes, because Bosh can both roll or pop out and score. Even if he’s rusty to start, you can’t just leave him. And that opens up everything for two of the best attacking wings in the game.

Miami has really only played near their peak in spurts these playoffs, but when the Heat felt their backs were against the wall, they have stepped up. This is a backs-against-the-wall game, and the Heat their trio back.

We’ll hear about how Boston is a scrappy, veteran team — and they are, this will not be easy — but Wade and Haslem have rings, LeBron has been to two NBA finals, and this is not an inexperienced Heat team.

The Heat have fought through nine games without Bosh and won enough to keep moving on, but they were not themselves. You get a feeling Game 5 is the kind of place they show up on fire — particularly on defense. That is where it shows when they relax. Miami can’t do that Tuesday night.

We know Boston will bring its fire, we know Rondo will play well, we know what they can do. If Miami doesn’t bring its “A” game, Boston will have the chance to close this series out at home. But Bosh makes it easier on the Heat to be the team they need to be. Much easier.

PBT Extra: Who do you want to see most in first All-Star Game?

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Tonight the NBA All-Star Game starters will be announced. Then the coaches have a week to vote and the rest of the roster will be put together by them.

This year should see a few first-time All-Stars, guys bursting on the scene and grabbing fans attention — so we asked people on Twitter who they most wanted to see in his first All-Star Game and I break it down in this PBT Extra.

The winner? Giannis Antetokounmpo with 45 percent of the vote. Which shouldn’t be a surprise, he’s second in the fan voting for the frontcourt in the East (behind only LeBron James). Good news for those fans, the Greek Freak is almost guaranteed to be a starter, he’s getting plenty of media votes and likely a lot from the players as well.

Second place in the poll? Joel Embiid of the Sixers. I’d love to see him, but will players and media members vote in a guy on a minutes restriction? Will the coaches pick him for that same reason? He is on the bubble.

Russell Westbrook: ‘Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—’ (video)

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Did Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant talk during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder last night? Westbrook said no, though video and first-hand accounts indicate otherwise.

Even more clearly: Westbrook – who walked near teammates Enes Kanter, Anthony Morrow and Jerami Grant – didn’t want someone talking to someone as they left the floor after the game. ESPN caught Westbrook saying, “Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—.”

You will never convince anyone Westbrook is referring to anyone but Durant.

Russell Westbrook commits epic travel (video)

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Between getting laid out by Zaza Pachulia and apparently talking with Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook committed a travel for the ages.

The Thunder guard took an inbound pass against the Warriors and just started walking up court without dribbling. The violation was so blatant, NBA officials even called the travel.

And it’s not as if they’re inclined to blow a whistle in that situation. Before Westbrook, Kemba Walker set a high bar last season, but he got away with this walk:

Are Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant on speaking terms after apparent conversation? Westbrook: ‘Nah’ (video)

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Russell Westbrook deleted Kevin Durant‘s goodbye text and, months later, told the whole world they still hadn’t talked.

That apparently changed during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder yesterday – though not if you ask Westbrook.

Westbrook dunked in the third quarter, and according to ESPN commentator Mark Jackson, Westbrook told Durant, “Don’t jump.” Anthony Slater of The Mercury News also wrote of the same quote.

ESPN’s telecast caught Durant clearly speaking to Westbrook shortly after. It appears Westbrook is talking back, but his back is to the camera.

After the game, Westbrook denied the exchange:

 

  • Reporter: “Are you and KD on speaking terms?”
  • Westbrook: “Nah.”
  • Reporter: “You guys had a little exchange in the third quarter.”
  • Westbrook: “What exchange?”
  • Reporter: “You and KD said something to each other.”
  • Westbrook: “Oh. You gotta maybe sit closer to the game. You maybe didn’t see clearly.”

This is so Westbrook – stubborn to the point of denying reality.

That approach worked for him when everyone rightly told him he was a significantly lesser player than Durant. Westbrook ignored that fact until it became false.

I suspect he wants to forget this exchange so he can maintain a cold animosity toward someone he prefers to resent.