take my life

Documentary released profiling grassroots effort to keep Kings in Sacramento


I called it ‘watching your own funeral,’ but instead of a eulogy there was Fan Appreciation Night. Instead of a pall-bearer, there stood Kobe Bryant.

You could’ve written the story of Sacramento’s fight to keep their team with a scalpel, but in this open-heart surgery there would be no anesthetic. The Lakers were in town, and with virtually every report pointing toward the imminent relocation of the team to Anaheim, there was only one more game to go for creaky, old Arco Arena (now metaphorically named after a company that can’t pay its bills).

For their part, the Lakers provided no quarter as they prepped for the postseason, jumping out to a 20-point lead at one point before halftime. Cutting through the anxious silence of one of the NBA’s loudest crowds – the sweet sounds of advertising – as the Maloofs continued to pitch based on the premise that they were staying.

By the time they honored lifelong season ticket holders at halftime, for their commitment to the team no less, I wandered to the gift shop to look for Anaheim Royals jerseys.

By the time the third quarter had started, Joe and Gavin Maloof left their courtside seats early and were replaced by Lakers fans. Adrienne Maloof’s reality TV cameras paced the sidelines so The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills could monetize the tears. Lakers fans could smell the desperation in the air and stopped giving Kings fans the business.

I began to wonder if the prisoner wanted to say a word.

But true to form, neither the team nor its fans were ready to quit. David roared back to force a Goliath overtime, and as life imitated art, Kings fans roared as thousands stayed and refused to leave their seats for over an hour after the game.

They chanted “Here we stay.”

Unlike SonicsGate, another must-watch documentary for any NBA fan, this flick isn’t an expose.  This is the uplifting tale of Sacramento’s effort to keep their team, an effort that David Stern called “extraordinary.”

It is called, “Small Market, Big Heart” and it’s focused on what the last couple of years have been like for Kings fans.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.