Zach Randolph, Marc Gasol, Kenyon Martin, Blake Griffin

Grizzlies steal Clippers’ script — come from behind to win, force Game 7

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In the first four games of this series, Chris Paul owned the fourth quarter, while at the same time the Grizzlies would get away from their game plan of pounding the Clippers inside with Zach Randolph. It’s why Los Angeles had a 3-1 series lead.

There will be a Game 7 Sunday because that script has flipped.

Paul, playing through an injured hip flexor, was a shadow of himself in the fourth quarter of Game 6 Friday — 0-1 shooting, no assists and two key turnovers when the score was 80-80 that led to a 5-0 Memphis run and lead the Grizzlies  never relinquished. On the other end, Randolph has 7 points and 4 offensive rebounds in the fourth quarter.

The result was a 90-88 Grizzlies win that brings them back from 3-1 and forces a Game 7 in Memphis Sunday.

And it is the status of Chris Paul’s hip and Blake Griffin’s knee that may have the biggest say in the outcome of Game 7. If it is the same Paul and Griffin, the Clippers are in a world of trouble on the road.

“I started off the game not sure about (his injury), but I can’t do that Sunday,” Paul said. “Sunday you got out there scrap, claw, whatever.”

Paul was clearly hurting early on and was tentative running the offense. Griffin wasn’t the same guy (but did hit a couple baseline 20 footers Memphis would have let him take all night healthy). The Grizzlies were slow to really try to exploit the pair but did eventually, went on a 14-4 run and took a little lead.

Looking for something, Clippers coach Vinny Del Negro switched up and went with an energy lineup that included Reggie Evans and Eric Bledsoe. It wasn’t pretty, but they were outworking Memphis all over the court. It changed the energy on the floor and in the building. Memphis responded to it with some ridiculous passes and turnovers — 13 in the first half — that kept the Clippers close when Memphis should have pulled away.

Clipper fans have taken to Reggie Evans as their fan favorite — they love everything about him. They love his energy, his flops, his ugly offense and all. Fans love a guy that just plays harder than everyone else, and nobody in the league comes in and sells it harder than Evans.

There was a real sense of hope when Paul returned and looked like his old self at the end of the second quarter, with penetration and smart passes. But that was a mirage.

The third quarter saw Memphis get back to its game plan of going inside — Marc Gasol had 23 points for the second straight game — however the Clippers energy level remained high and the game stayed close. It was tied 66-66 entering fourth.

The Clippers at one point went on 10-0 run sparked by Eric Bledsoe and had an eight-point lead, but Memphis answered with a 10-0 run sparked by Rudy Gay knocking down shots you know coach Lionel Hollins didn’t want him to take.

When it was tight late it was the Grizzlies executed and the Clippers could not — Paul was being cut off in the lane, Randy Foye was taking leaning jumpers (and missing), Foye was also stepping out of bounds on rebounds, Eric Bledsoe was taking the most shots (five), and the bounces and calls went Memphis’ way mostly. Meanwhile the Grizzlies for once stayed true to who they are and just kept going inside.

“It boiled down to just understanding their sets, going through our guys who had it going, execution on the offensive end, from the plays coach drew up…” Tony Allen said. “Down the stretch we just clawed and clawed.”

Leading into Game 7 the players are going to talk about clawing and executing and all of it. Both teams will talk about their role players stepping up (that usually happens for the home team in the playoffs).

But it will be the status of Paul’s hip and Griffin’s knee that may have the biggest say. If CP3 is himself again, all bets are off.

Report: Seton Hall guard Isaiah Whitehead to stay in NBA draft

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 12:  Isaiah Whitehead #15 of the Seton Hall Pirates reacts against the Villanova Wildcats during the Big East Basketball Tournament Championship at Madison Square Garden on March 12, 2016 in New York City. Seton Hall Pirates defeated Villanova Wildcats 69-67.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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Update 2: Nevermind the nevermind. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

 

Update: Nevermind. Zagoria:

 

Isaiah Whitehead entered the 2016 NBA draft without an agent.

But it doesn’t appear he’ll return to Seton Hall.

Adam Zagoria of SNY.tv:

Isaiah Whitehead will announce his future plans on Thursday, with sources telling SNY.tv he will remain in the NBA Draft.

Whitehead looks like a second-round pick, though more likely to go undrafted than climb into the first round. However, this draft is particularly wide open. It takes just one team to like a player.

A 6-foot-5, 21-year-old score-first guard, Whitehead too often guns himself out of efficiency. He uses his strength and first step well to create separation for his pull-up jumper and has quality range on it. But, despite occasional impressive-looking finishes at the rim, his overall conversion rate in the paint is horrific. He’s not impressive enough outside to offset that.

His size would be a plus at point guard, but he lacks the distributing skills to play that position in the NBA any time soon. I don’t see what separates him as a shooting guard.

Steven Adams fires bullet pass to Andre Roberson for dunk (video)

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This is a heck of a pass from Thunder center pitcher Steven Adams.

Draymond Green trips Enes Kanter (video)

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 24:  Draymond Green #23 of the Golden State Warriors looks to rebound against Kevin Durant #35 and Enes Kanter #11 of the Oklahoma City Thunder in the first half in game four of the Western Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 24, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Draymond Green tripped Enes Kanter.

But did he do it intentionally?

Green – who twice kicked Steven Adams in the groin, didn’t get suspended for it and then declared “I’m never going to be careful” – is back as the center of controversy. This time, it’s for his quick leg lock that sent Kanter to the floor in Game 4 of the Western Conference finals.

If it were any other player, we probably wouldn’t be discussing this play. Maybe we should be in other circumstances, but it’s a bang-bang play that happens throughout games. It usually, though not always, gets ignored. But Green has lost the benefit of the doubt.

I waffle on whether to sign intent. Yes, Green’s legs come together, but his left foot might have bounced off the floor while gravity brought his right leg. Remember, in any slow-motion replay, a player will appear to have greater control of his body. It doesn’t always play out that way in real speed – especially while a player is falling.

If the NBA assigns Green a flagrant 1 for this play, he’ll be suspended for Game 5. And at this point, he might deserve it. It’s just harder and harder to give him the benefit of the doubt.

Report: Stephen Curry still at 70 percent due to knee injury

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The Oklahoma City Thunder have overwhelmed the Golden State Warriors with their athleticism, their improved defense, and the shot making of stars Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. The Thunder are doing a lot of things right and have lifted themselves up to an elite status.

But the Warriors have not pushed back against this. Not like we expected the defending champions and a 73-win team would. Draymond Green is a shell of himself, a -72 the last couple games the Thunder have gotten in his head and have him second guessing his every decision.

Then there is Stephen Curry, who is 13-of-37 shooting the past two games, 5-of-21 from three, and a -58. He hasn’t carried the Warriors as he did for stretches this season, and it is lingering issues from his knee injury that are partially holding him back, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

Curry has been a shell of himself – missing shots, throwing away passes, losing his dribble, and completely unable to prove that there’s Curry-esque agility in that knee. “He’s playing at 70 percent, at best,” a source close to Curry told The Vertical. Curry refuses to make excuses, but privately the Thunder see something – no explosion, no ability to make the bigs switching onto him pay a price. Twenty points on 19 shots Tuesday night bore no resemblance to the two-time NBA Most Valuable Player.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr dismissed the idea that Curry was injured after the game Tuesday, saying he “had a lousy night.”

Curry missed a couple of weeks of play with a sprained MCL, but returned last round.

There have been flashes of that old Curry since his return — the monster fourth quarter and overtime against Portland in Game 4, or the third quarter of Game 2 against the Thunder — but what made Curry a back-to-back MVP was a sustained level of excellence, and that has gone away. He just can’t flip the switch and change a game right now the way he could for most of the past couple seasons.

You can tell the Thunder sense it — they are going right at him, attacking Curry’s defense knowing he can’t move well enough to handle their athletes. There is no mercy in the NBA and if teams sense a weakness they will exploit it — the Thunder sense that with Curry.

The way the Thunder are playing, a healthy Curry may not have made a difference, but you can bet the last couple games would not have been the same blowouts.