NBA Playoffs: Nuggets play their game in their building, take Game 3 from Lakers

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George Karl had a quiet confidence about his team heading home to Denver, even after dropping the first two games of the series to the Lakers in Los Angeles. He saw a lot of good things in his club, especially in a close Game 2 contest, and couldn’t wait to get back to the Pepsi Center for Friday night’s Game 3.

Karl is one of the sharpest and most tenured coaches in the league, and it turned out that what he saw in his Nuggets was legit. Denver pounced on the Lakers early, and led by as many as 24 points before holding on for a 99-84 win that cut L.A.’s lead in the series to 2-1.

The Lakers couldn’t match Denver’s energy from the opening tip. Ty Lawson set the pace with 13 first-quarter points, Denver killed L.A. on the boards in the opening period 17-6, and led by 16 after one. The Nuggets held Andrew Bynum scoreless in the first half with just three rebounds, largely due to the fact that with Denver getting out in transition, there were less half-court opportunities for the Lakers’ All-Star center.

With the lack of an inside game, the Lakers resorted to jumpshots and three-pointers, with limited success. L.A. went just 6-for-25 from three-point distance, and those attempts accounted for nearly a third of the team’s total. That’s not the Lakers’ game, and that’s not the way they’re going to win games in the postseason.

Kobe Bryant accounted for 10 of those shots on his own, and finished with 22 points on just 7-for-23 shooting.

Energy was the key to this one for Denver, as was evidenced by the monster games from Kenneth Faried and JaVale McGee. The Nuggets’ bigs were nothing more than role players who had a minimal impact on Games 1 and 2, but Faried finished with 12 points and 15 rebounds, and McGee was an even bigger factor with his 16 points, 15 rebounds, and three blocked shots off the bench.

The Lakers are still the more talented team in this series, and this game, especially when viewed alongside the second half of Game 2, should serve as a bit of a wake-up call for them in terms of what this Denver team is capable of if you let them get going, and try to play their game, at their tempo, in their building.

It’s no secret what the Lakers need to do to take Game 4: they have to bring energy from the start, focus on containing Lawson, and not get sucked into playing uptempo and shooting threes when they have two dominant offensive seven-footers in Bynum and Pau Gasol who can score inside.

That’s easier said than done, of course, especially playing in Denver. Which might have been exactly why George Karl was so excited about his team’s chances in this series once they left Los Angeles.

Joel Embiid upgrades himself from 69% to 81%: ‘Shoutout to Jalen Rose’

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A story in three parts:

1. After posting 46-15-7-7 in a win over the Lakers, frequently injured 76ers center Joe Embiid declared himself to be 69%:

2. ESPN analyst Jalen Rose called that joke “unprofessional:”

3. Embiid upgraded his status to 81% with a “shoutout to Jalen Rose:”

In case you didn’t get the joke.

Celtics’ Kyrie Irving: “It was a nice streak. But it was time to come to an end.”

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The Celtics established themselves as one of the NBA’s elite teams, a contender for the Eastern Conference title, during their 16-game win streak.

However, that hot streak to start the season will matter as much as Thanksgiving leftovers in the back of the refrigerator in April by the time the playoffs roll around. This is a team that still has work to do.

Which is what Kyrie Irving was getting at in this post-loss quote from Friday night, via Israel Gutierrez of ESPN.

“There’s still a lot to accomplish going forward,” Irving said. “It was a nice streak. But it was time to come to an end.”

This team still needs to get better and more consistent. The Celtics had to come from behind in the fourth quarter in eight of the 16 wins, and while the team defense was impressive the offense still can be hit and miss. Al Horford and Kyrie Irving play well off each other, but this is still the 20th ranked offense in the NBA. They are taking more long midrange jumpers than most coaches want, but the bigger challenge is they have not been finishing around the basket.

Titles are not won in November. Irving gets that. Jayson Tatum will hit the rookie wall at some point (they all do) and he needs to prove he can break through. Al Horford is playing maybe the best ball of his career and needs to keep it up. The Celtics need to keep their defensive focus (the fundamentals are there to have a top five defense). I could go on but you get the point, and so does Irving — there is a lot of work for this team to do.

Boston is off to a fantastic start, but it’s just that.

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich: I’ve never seen injury like Kawhi Leonard’s

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Gregg Popovich is a basketball lifer.

He’s the NBA’s most experienced active head coach. Before that, he was the Spurs’ general manager. Before that, he was an NBA assistant. Before that, he was a college head coach and assistant. Before that, he was a college player. Before that, he was a youth player.

The San Antonio coach has seen everything.

Except the right quadriceps tendinopathy suffered by Kawhi Leonard, whom Popovich said more than a week would return “sooner rather than later.” Yet, Leonard still hasn’t played this season.

Popovich, via Michael C. Wright of ESPN:

“Never, never,” Popovich said when asked whether he has seen such a condition hampering one of his players. “What’s really strange is that [point guard] Tony [Parker] has the same injury, but even worse. They had to go operate on his quad tendon and put it back together or whatever they did to it. So to have two guys, that’s pretty incredible. I had never seen it before those guys.”

“I keep saying sooner rather than later,” Popovich said jokingly. “It’s kind of like being a politician. It’s all baloney, doesn’t mean anything.”

The 26-year-old Leonard is one of the NBA’s biggest on-court stars. He might be the league’s best defender, and he has built himself into an offensive force. The Spurs (11-7) have fared fine without him so far, but they’ll need him to accomplish their main goals – this year and beyond.

Hopefully, Leonard’s health is better than it sounds here, because Popovich’s answer sure isn’t encouraging.

Tim Hardaway Jr. calls fallen ref safe rather than defend shot (video)

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The Knicks went on a 28-0 run.

They earned the right to showboat late in their win over the Raptors last night.

Tim Hardaway Jr. called a ref, who slipped on the baseline, safe rather than contest Serge Ibaka‘s 3-pointer. Perfection!