Phil Jackson

Should Knicks open up the bank account to get Phil Jackson?


One year later, the New York Knicks are in exactly the same place — about to be swept out of the playoffs in the first round.

At the end of a roller coaster year in New York where there was “Linsanity”, where Mike D’Antoni was out and Mike Woodson was in, where Steve Novak and J.R. Smith have both shined and faltered, the Knicks are in the exact same spot.

Plenty of New Yorkers want Phil Jackson to be the guy who moves them off that spot, who turns them into a contender. Knicks owner James Dolan reportedly is one of those guys.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo says the Knicks need to back the brinks truck up to Phil Jackson’s Montana ranch to lure him out of retirement.

The end of this inevitable Eastern Conference playoff sweep on Sunday promises the beginning of a most inevitable pursuit: Dolan chasing his next savior, Phil Jackson. Along the way, Dolan ought to forget selling Jackson on his New York Knicks nostalgia and sentiment, on the joys of coaching Anthony. Jackson knows his own history here, and knows he never would’ve won a solitary title with the Lakers and Bulls had ‘Melo been one of his cornerstones.

Dolan doesn’t need to come with the elaborate recruiting presentation that he did for James for a simple reason: Above everything else, this is a cash deal. No salary cap, no limits…

Three years, $40 million-plus ought to do it.

Honestly, I’m not sure that will do it.

Jackson has long been open to the idea of coaching the Knicks because of his history there as a player, because he loves the city. He will be tempted. And we all would be tempted by that kind of cash.

But my gut says when it comes time to say yes or no Jackson will remember how his body felt at the end of his run with the Lakers — worn down, in need of surgeries, exhausted. At the end, to watch him in person was to see a guy who just looked done with it all. Being an NBA coach is a grind. Jackson has done that grind and I don’t think he will go back to eating airplane food, the rigors of travel, sleeping in beds that are too short, not getting enough sleep. He’s done all that. Now he splits time between Los Angeles on the beach and a ranch in Montana, seeing his grandkids, writing a book and getting to do some traveling. Does he really want to return to the grind? To coach a roster he doesn’t love and that does not really fit his system?

You can’t sell Jackson on legacy — he already has that. I don’t think sentimentality for the past will sway him. Woj is right in that cash is the one thing the Knicks have plenty of that may move the needle.

But my gut tells me even that will not be enough. My gut is wrong plenty. Just ask my wife. But I think while he’ll flirt with New York he won’t come back. No matter how much money they offer.

Watch as DeMar DeRozan drop 40, lead Raptors to 109-91 win over Pistons

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TORONTO (AP) — DeMar DeRozan scored 40 points and Jonas Valanciunas added a career-high 32 as the Toronto Raptors opened their season with a 109-91 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Wednesday night.

DeRozan made a career-high 17 field goals on 27 shots and was a perfect 6 for 6 from the free throw line, while Valanciunas was 10 for 15 from the field to go along with 11 rebounds. Valanciunas’ previous career high was 31, also against the Pistons, on Jan. 12, 2015.

Tobias Harris had 22 points and Marcus Morris had 17 points and nine rebounds for the Pistons, who lost for the eighth time in their last 11 games against Toronto.

DeRozan broke Vince Carter‘s opening-night record of 39 points, set against the-then New Jersey Nets in 2003. Alvin Robertson is the only other Toronto player to record a 30-point opening-night game, in the franchise’s first-ever game, also against New Jersey, in 1995.

Pascal Siakam, drafted 27th overall in June, became the first Toronto rookie to start a season opener since Valanciunas in 2012, and rose to the occasion, hauling in nine rebounds to go along with four points in 21 minutes.

Despite falling into a seven-point deficit 2:09 into the game, the Raptors went in front on a jumper by DeRozan with 6:47 to go in the first quarter and led the rest of the way.

DeRozan and Valanciunas steadied the ship in the opening quarter, driving to the basket and drawing fouls. They were a combined 13 for 13 from the free throw line and scored 15 and 10 points, respectively, as the Raptors took a 33-23 lead after one quarter.

While Detroit responded against Toronto’s reserves in the second, drawing within four points early on through Morris, Valanciunas returned to the game and added another 11 points as the Raptors pulled into a 58-46 halftime lead.

DeRozan provided much of the fireworks in the third quarter, scoring 21 points as Toronto pulled away to lead 86-71 going into the final 12 minutes.


Pistons: C Andre Drummond took a hard elbow to the face from Valanciunas at the start of the game and remained down on the court. Detroit was forced to burn a full timeout, but Drummond returned to the court. . Henry Ellenson, Detroit’s first-round draft pick last June (18th overall) went scoreless in two minutes of play, while second-round selection Michael Gbinije (49th overall), had two points in two minutes.

Raptors: C Lucas Nogueira (ankle) sat out. . DeRozan started his franchise-record eighth straight season opener, breaking a tie with Carter. . Kyle Lowry‘s basket with 3:58 remaining in the first quarter broke the monopoly of Valanciunas and DeRozan, who had scored all the points up to that point. . First-round draft pick Jakob Poeltl became the first Austrian to play in the NBA. He finished with two points in 13 minutes. . Oct. 26 is the earliest date that Toronto has ever had a home opener. . The Raptors are 13-9 on opening night and have won four straight.


PBT Extra: Spurs showed Warriors have work to do defensively

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Nobody expected what happened Tuesday night in the Bay Area.

If you had said “San Antonio would beat Golden State by five” most people would have said that’s a possibility — but nobody saw a 29-point thrashing. A game where the Spurs were never threatened and where Kawhi Leonard looked like the MVP.

What does it mean? In this PBT Extra I talk about how the Spurs showed the Warriors they have some work to do on the defensive end. The Warriors clearly miss the rim protection and rebounding of Andrew Bogut, and they are going to have to make that up as a team (because Zaza Pachulia is no Bogut). The Warriors also have 81 more games to figure it out.

Cleveland, on the other hand, has it figured out.



Anthony Davis becomes first player since Michael Jordan to score 50 in opener – and adds 16-5-7-4

NEW ORLEANS, LA - OCTOBER 26:  Anthony Davis #23 of the New Orleans Pelicans shoots over Will Barton #5 of the Denver Nuggets during the second quarter at the Smoothie King Center on October 26, 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)
Sean Gardner/Getty Images

An astounding 86% of general managers said one year ago Anthony Davis was their preferred choice to build a franchise around.

An underwhelming season by the Pelicans put Davis in a strange light, and he ended the year sidelined due to injury.

Asked the same question this year, general managers gave Karl-Anthony Towns took a plurality of votes. Davis also plunged behind Kevin Durant and LeBron James.

Well, Davis sent a message to those who no longer view him as an elite franchise cornerstone. His opening-night performance:

  • 50 points
  • 16 rebounds
  • 5 assists
  • 7 steals
  • 4 blocks

The last player to score 50 in a season opener was Michael Jordan in 1989. No player since at least 1983-84 has matched Davis’ stat line across the five major categories in any game.

Yes, New Orleans lost – 107-102 to the Nuggets. But Davis’ teammates shot 36% from the field and 18% on 3-pointers.

Davis produced an all-time great individual performance. That the rest of the Pelicans couldn’t keep up says only so much.

He just knows how to make a splash in season openers.

76ers on blocking anthem singer wearing ‘WE MATTER’ jersey: ‘We use our games to bring people together’

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - AUGUST 01:  Actress Sevyn Streeter speaks onstage during the 'Ringside' panel discussion at the TV One portion of the 2016 Television Critics Association Summer Tour at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on August 1, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Sevyn Streeter said the 76ers prevented her from singing the national anthem at tonight’s game because she was wearing a “WE MATTER” jersey:

76ers statement:

“The Philadelphia 76ers organization encourages meaningful actions to drive social change. We use our games to bring people together, to build trust and to strengthen our communities. As we move from symbolic gestures to action, we will continue to leverage our platform to positively impact our community.”

This is a continuation of Carmelo Anthony‘s argument: The emphasis should be on action in communities and there’s no longer a place for gestures like Colin Kaepernick kneeling.

But this needn’t be an either/or discussion. Community-based action is obviously important (though don’t assign responsibility to NBA players to fix racism). Recognizing the width and depth of the problem is necessary – which is why symbols matter, too.

Take Street’s shirt at face value. “We matter.” “Black lives matter.” What’s so offensive about that? There is no implicit “more” attached.

Yet, the 76ers found it antithetical to their brand.

This is why the widespread “unity” message preached by arm-locking NBA players left so much to be desired.

To the 76ers, unity meant silencing Streeter.

Is that what players were demonstrating on behalf of during the preseason? I’m sure that arena was much more united with a 76ers dancer singing the anthem than it would have been with Streeter spotlighted. But sometimes divisiveness is necessary to advance a cause.

If the 76ers don’t want Streeter using their platform to say “WE MATTER,” that’s their right. Not everyone has to support that choice, though.