Kentucky’s Davis draws comparisons to Griffin, Garnett

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May 30 the NBA Draft Lottery will take place in a state the NBA has abandoned, but most of the time we will be calling the draw the “Anthony Davis Sweepstakes” because Kentucky big man will be the first guy taken in the draft.

This is a draft where GMs are saying there could be three to six future All-Stars and teams can get future rotation players into the 40s. This draft is deep. Of course, there will be busts and some GMs are going to hear the “how could you draft X over Y?” in a few years, but that’s part of the game.

However, there’s not much risk with Davis, who is long, defensive minded, hard working guy with handles and room to improve on offense. Look at the rave reviews some GMs gave Sam Amick of Sports Illustrated about Davis (hat tip to Crossover Chronicles):

One of the West general managers said Davis “is probably going to be better than Blake Griffin,” and his GM colleague upped the ante by saying he expects him to be better than 14-time All-Star and future Hall of Famer Kevin Garnett.

“There’s not one doubt in my mind that he’s going to be way better than Blake Griffin,” the second GM said. “I don’t even think it’s going to be close. I think he might end up being a little better than KG.

“He may be the quiet, humble [player] who’s not as great as Tim Duncan, but [he’ll be] that kind of a person, and maybe have the game to back it up. I don’t think he gets to that [Duncan] level, but he’s going to be pretty good.”

Lofty company. The floor for him seems to be a Marcus Camby like career, and if that’s the case that’s still not bad.

We will see if he can live up to it. Where Davis fits in to me is with Derrick Rose and Kevin Durant — the new class of NBA stars who tend to be humble, hard working, good people. Not egomaniacs. There will always be those in the NBA, but the new crop of stars seems to be more grounded. We’ll see how that plays out, too.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.