Orlando Magic's Jameer Nelson, Ryan Anderson and Glen Davis guard Boston Celtics Paul Pierce as he makes a shot in front of Orlando Magic Jason Richardson in the second half of their NBA basketball game at TD Garden in Boston

Baseline to Baseline recaps: It’s all about playoff positioning


What you missed while realizing why you act the way you do at games

Thunder 108, Suns 97: The Thunder hung with the Spurs at the top of the conference, but at the expense of the Suns chances. Brett Pollakoff was at this game for PBT and tells us that James Harden is really, really good.

Celtics 102, Magic 98: Orlando still can’t defend well without Dwight Howard, but they showed a little fight in this one, and that’s something. The Magic’s biggest push was a 14-2 run in the fourth quarter that made this one close through the end. Both teams were without key players — no Howard, no Hedo Turkoglu, no Rajon Rondo, no Ray Allen — but the Celtics did have Paul Pierce. He had a key jumper and a free throw in the final 10 seconds to seal the win and cap off his 29 points (on just 14 shots). The Celtics are locked in at the four basically; Orlando will be the six seed unless Atlanta stumbles.

Jazz 112, Trail Blazers 91: Utah is your new eight seed in the West. For a day. But this win combined with Phoenix and Houston losing has Utah half a game up into the playoffs. As for the game, the Jazz took control in the second half of the second quarter with a 20-6 run and never looked back. Utah dominated in the backcourt with Devin Harris dropping 27 and Gordon Hayward 23.

Mavericks 117, Rockets 110: This is five straight losses for a Rockets team that needs to find some wins to make the playoffs — they are now half a game behind the new eight-seed Jazz (tied with the Suns). Most frustrating to Kevin McHale and crew is that they had the lead in the fourth but a 20-6 run doomed them. Dirk Nowitzki was at the heart of that run — he had 21 of his 35 in the fourth quarter, seemingly getting to the line every time he touched the ball. Dallas also defended better in the second half (they started switching all picks) and the Rockets hot outside shooting cooled.

Dallas stays in the six seed spot, half a game up on Denver.

Heat 96, Raptors 82: No Dwyane Wade or Chris Bosh, didn’t matter mostly because Toronto has mentally packed it in for the season. LeBron James had 28 points on 15 shots. Pretty much everybody was focused on the Thursday night showdown with the Bulls.

Knicks 104, Nets 95: Carmelo Anthony came out on fire — 21 first quarter points — and he pushed the Knicks out to an early lead, and from there they cruised to a win. The win keeps them in the seven seed. They get Amare Stoudemire back Friday and there will be an adjustment period, and we all also get to see how ready Stoudemire and his back really are. As for the Nets… ugh.

Sixers 103, Cavaliers 87: This was close until a 24-2 run in the third quarter — sparked when Lou Williams entered the game, even though he wasn’t scoring it changed the matchups and energy. The guy who was scoring was Jrue Holiday, who had 19 of his team high 24 in the third. Good to see Kyrie Irving back — he played 20 minutes and looked rusty as you would expect.

Wizards 121, Bucks 112: Stick a fork in the Bucks, they are done. They needed this win and now are 2.5 games back of the 76ers. They are not going to catch them. The Wizards took charge with a 17-6 run to open the second half and then when a desperate Bucks team would make a push late Jordan Crawford responded. Crawford had 32.

Clippers 104, Nuggets 98: With Ty Lawson and Andre Miller, Denver did a good job of pressuring Chris Paul and trying to get the ball out of his hands. That worked to a degree — the Clippers had 12 turnovers in the first half. But it also left open Clippers three point shooters and they hit 14-24 from deep and that kept them in it. Then the Clippers closed the game on an 8-2 run to win — a run sparked by Kenyon Martin. With the win the Clippers keep pressure on the Lakers for the top spot in the Pacific.

Grizzlies 103, Hornets 91: Memphis took control of this game with an 18-2 run in the third and never looked back. It was sparked by Rudy Gay, who had 13 of his 26 in the third, plus Mike Conley who had 20 points on the night.

Bulls 100, Bobcats 68: No Derrick Rose, no Luol Deng, no problem. Rip Hamilton started the game 7-of-7 from the floor, the Bulls pulled away and Tom Thibodeau was able to lean on his bench so key players are not to tired for the showdown with the Heat.

Hawks 116, Pistons 84: This was an old-school, empty the bench blowout where Atlanta led by as many as 41 at times. The only thing of interest here is that Tracy McGrady led the Hawks in scoring with 17.

Spurs 127, Kings 102: Not exactly a defensive struggle, but the Spurs owned the game from the third quarter on. Which is impressive because it was the third game in three nights and Gregg Popovich sat Tim Duncan. Seven different Spurs scored in double figures and they got 71 points out of their bench.

Lakers 99, Warriors 87: Golden State likes to play small ball, which is why Andrew Bynum had 17 points in the first quarter and 31 for the game, while Paul Gasol had a triple-double (22 points, 11 rebounds, 11 assists). This game pretty much followed the script you would expect.

Russell Westbrook, Thunder prepare for life without Kevin Durant

DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 11:  Russell Westbrook #0 of the Oklahoma City Thunder during a preseason game at American Airlines Center on October 11, 2016 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Maybe life after Kevin Durant won’t be so bad for the Thunder.

After the longtime face of the franchise left for Golden State, crestfallen Oklahoma City fans were worried it was just a matter of time before the team’s co-star, Russell Westbrook, would follow suit. In a move that shocked many, Westbrook re-signed with Oklahoma City. The former scoring champion and two-time All-Star MVP’s return gives the team hope.

New faces such as shooting guard Victor Oladipo and forward Domantas Sabonis, both acquired in the deal that sent Serge Ibaka to Orlando, might take some time to fit in. Westbrook believes the team is talented enough to succeed if it is focused and the new pieces blend with the old ones who helped the Thunder reach the Western Conference Finals last season.

“Just play hard, man,” Westbrook said. “I don’t know, win or lose. The only thing I know is that as long as we play hard, we give ourselves an opportunity to win.”

Westbrook could post historic numbers. He averaged 23.5 points, 10.4 assists and 7.8 rebounds last season and had 18 triple-doubles, the most since Magic Johnson had 18 during the 1981-82 season. Without Durant, more of that could be on the way.

Sabonis, a rookie out of Gonzaga who played for Lithuania’s Olympic team, played with the starters throughout the preseason. Oladipo averaged 15.9 points and 4.0 assists in three years with Orlando. He joins Westbrook to form arguably the most athletic backcourt tandem in the NBA.

“Defensively, I think we can be the best defensive backcourt in the league because we can do different things with our size and using our length and our speed,” Westbrook said.

Here are some things to watch for the Thunder:

Steven Adams

The 7-footer from New Zealand was already a top-notch defender and rebounder before stepping up his offense and averaging 10.1 points during the playoffs last season. In his final two preseason games, he scored 20 points against Minnesota and 17 points against Denver. He could be a breakout star.

“I think we’ve had an opportunity these last two nights (against Minnesota and Denver) how good he is around the basket, how smart he has become and how much of a presence he is in the middle,” Westbrook said.

Enes Kanter

The natural expectation was that Ibaka’s departure would prompt coach Billy Donovan to move Kanter, who finished third in balloting for the league’s sixth-man award last season, into the starting lineup. Instead, Donovan started Sabonis throughout the preseason. Perhaps Donovan knows best – Sabonis showed he can hang with the starters, and Kanter averaged 17.8 points and 9.4 rebounds while shooting 61.7 percent in the preseason.


Oklahoma City’s defense could slip with Ibaka in Orlando. Sabonis has great potential, but he’s young, and NBA defense takes some time to learn. Donovan said Sabonis has caught on quickly, but there still could be a dip early because Ibaka’s level of play is difficult to replace – he was a three-time first-team All-NBA defender and a two-time blocks leader.


The Thunder added several foreign players to the roster who will add depth – Spain’s Alex Abrines, France’s Joffrey Lauvergne and Turkey’s Ersan Ilyasova. Donovan said he likes the maturity foreign players add to a team. Abrines played for Spain’s national team that earned bronze medals at the Olympics. Lauvergne played for France in Rio.


Andre Roberson has shifted from the starting shooting guard to starting small forward. That means the Thunder still have Roberson’s dynamic athletic ability, defensive prowess and nose for the ball on the boards in the lineup. He was a liability on offense in the past, but he started becoming more of a factor on offense during the playoffs last season.

“I think he feels more comfortable and confident offensively,” Donovan said. “He’s put forth effort in that area. It’s just him continuing to grow offensively and trying to put him in situations where he slashes to the basket and he can cut and he can get out in transition and he can take his open corner threes.”

Follow Cliff Brunt on Twitter (at)CliffBruntAP

Raptors’ Jared Sullinger to have foot surgery, miss “extended time”

ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 19:  Jared Sullinger #7 of the Boston Celtics looks on from the bench against the Atlanta Hawks in Game Two of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Philips Arena on April 19, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  NOTE TO USER User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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The Toronto Raptors are counting on Jared Sullinger to cover for the loss of Bismack Biyombo by crashing the boards, helping them space the floor on offense, and just being solid.

But they are going to have to get by without him for a while, something first reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports, and confirmed by the team.

There is no timeline for Sullinger’s return, but it’s going to be a while. Sullinger had battled a stress reaction in his foot a year ago, this is likely an extension of that problem.

This certainly hurts the Raptors’ depth up front, but it’s also not a massive setback for a team with lofty aspirations this season. Patrick Patterson will get more minutes, which is a good thing, plus the Raptors need to play DeMarre Carroll more at the four. They can wait for Sullinger (who they signed this summer after Boston let him walk in the wake of signing Al Horford.

Heat waive Beno Udrih, Briante Webber, two others to keep Rodney McGruder

MIAMI, FL - FEBRUARY 09:  Beno Udrih #19 of the Miami Heat drives on Tony Parker #9 of the San Antonio Spurs during a game  at American Airlines Arena on February 9, 2016 in Miami, Florida. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory copyright notice:  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
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Beno Udrih sacrificed $90,000 last season to get the Heat an additional $2.7 million last season.

They repaid him with more than $1.5 million this season (though less than $1 million of it from their own pockets).

And that’s all they gave him.

Miami won’t even give Udrih a regular-season roster spot, waiving him to allow Rodney McGruder to make the team.

Heat release:

The Miami HEAT announced today that they have waived Vashil Fernandez, Luis Montero, Beno Udrih, Brianté Weber and Okaro White.

To recap: Out for the rest of the final season of his guaranteed contract due to injury, Udrih took a buyout that lowered his compensation by $90,000 last season. That brought the Heat under the luxury-tax line, preventing them from paying the repeater rate and allowing them to receive about $2.5 million given to non-tax-paying teams. Miami then re-signed Udrih this offseason, giving him a one-year, $1,551,659 fully guaranteed contract. Most players with guaranteed salaries stick into the regular season, but it seems the Heat paid Udrih for a reason other than their faith in him as a backup point guard.

Here’s the kicker: Because Udrih was a 12-year veteran on a one-year minimum contract, the league – funded by the very teams that rightfully protested Miami’s arrangement – has to fund $571,228 of his salary.

The Heat seemed high on Briante Weber, but he’s young and needs polish. McGruder, who went undrafted out of Kansas State in 2013, is probably more capable of helping now.

This leaves Miami without a clear backup point guard behind Goran Dragic, but combo guards Tyler Johnson and Josh Richardson can handle the role.

Chris Paul hopes Clippers develop real home court advantage this year

PLAYA VISTA, CA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Chris Paul #3 of the Los Angeles Clippers, Blake Griffin #32 and DeAndre Jordan #6 share a laugh during media day at the Los Angeles Clippers Training Center on September 26, 2016 in Playa Vista, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory copyright notice. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)
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At Clippers home games, you generally wouldn’t use the word “rockin'” to describe the atmosphere. With that, the Los Angeles Clippers are a good team at home, but not a whole lot better than they are on the road. Last season the Clippers won 29 games at Staples Center, 24 away from home. The season before they won 30 at home. The Clippers don’t defend their home court like other elite teams: The past two seasons combined the Clippers have won 19 fewer home games than the Warriors, 15 fewer than the Spurs, five less than the Cavaliers.

Chris Paul wants that to change.

Staples Center can get loud — it has for Kobe Bryant and the Lakers. Chris Paul isn’t laying the blame on the building or Clippers game operations, he told Dan Woike of the Orange County Register it’s on the players to give the fans something to cheer about.

“One of the biggest things for us is our home court hasn’t really been a home court,” Paul said. “I don’t know. For some reason we just haven’t made it a tough place to play.

“ … Obviously it’s our mentality. We’re the ones playing. We have to give our crowd something to cheer about, something to get behind. We’ve got to make Staples Center, for our home games, a tough place to play.”

“I feel like sometimes we’re a better road team than we are a home team, and that’s not good,” center DeAndre Jordan said. “I mean it’s good, but we want to be a great team at home and a really, really, really good team on the road. We need to figure out how to transition that, and we’ll be fine, but we’ve got to pick it up at home.”

Los Angeles is a city visiting players circle on the schedule — there’s a lot of fun to be had in the City of Angels. That can have opposing players less focused and not at 100 percent when they take the floor for the game, but the Clippers don’t seem to have that advantage. Do the Clippers relax more at home? Are they too comfortable?

The Clippers are an elite team, but if they are going to advance to the Western Conference Finals it’s not going to be one big thing but a lot of little ones that take them to the next level. Having Staples Center become a real house of horrors for opponents is one of those things. We’ll see if things are different for the Clippers this year.