List of college underclassmen who declared for NBA draft, so far

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Tuesday is the big day — at least the NCAA says it’s the big day. The NBA says April 29 is the big day.

Let me explain (if you want more details as always DraftExpress has them). If you scan below you will see a list, courtesy our fine friends at the Associated Press, of all the college underclassmen who have announced for the NBA draft up to this point.

Under a new, unilateral NCAA rule, those players (if they have not hired an agent) have until this Tuesday (April 10) to withdraw their name from the NBA draft. Meaning if your name is still on that list as of April 11 you are in the draft.

But here’s the kicker — the NBA says you do not have to declare for the draft until April 29. Anthony Davis, the lock No. 1 pick out of Kentucky, has said he plans to take up to that deadline to make up his mind. A lot of guys are going to take their time. The thing is, after April 10 if you add your name to the draft list there is no backing out.

Why would the NCAA do this? Why would the NCAA do a lot of things? But in this case it’s to pressure players to make an early decision so that when the spring National Letter of Intent signing period opens the coaches will have a better idea of how many spots to fill. Forget about letting young men test the waters of the draft, get a real feel from teams where they stand, then make an informed decision. That doesn’t help the schools. So screw the kids, try to make them decide early.

Anyway, here is the list. Anybody on this list can back out before Wednesday, although most likely will stay in.

Harrison Barnes, forward, North Carolina
J’Covan Brown, guard, Texas
Moe Harkless, swingman, St. John’s
John Henson, forward, North Carolina
Meyers Leonard, center, Illinois
Damian Lillard, guard, Weber St.
Kendall Marshall, guard, North Carolina
Fab Melo, center, Syracuse
Arnett Moultrie, forward, Mississippi St.
Austin Rivers, guard, Duke
Terrence Ross, guard, Washington
Renardo Sidney, forward, Mississippi St.
Jared Sullinger, forward, Ohio State
Hollis Thompson, forward, Georgetown
Dion Waiters, guard, Syracuse
Maalik Wayns, guard, Villanova
Royce White, forward, Iowa State
Tony Wroten, guard, Washington
B.J. Young, guard, Arkansas

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.