Blake Griffin’s response to DeMarcus Cousins calling him an actor: “You have to consider the source.”

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There’s a weird sort of rivalry brewing between the Kings and the Clippers, that, on the surface, doesn’t seem to make much sense. While L.A. has two current All-Stars and is likely to be a top-four seed when the playoffs begin in a few short weeks, Sacramento is a perennial lottery team with a couple of decent assets, but not much else.

When you look at the way Blake Griffin and DeMarcus Cousins each play the game with a chip on their shoulder, things begin to come into focus.

Griffin and Cousins went at it last Thursday, and the moody Sacramento big man didn’t like the way Griffin was treated by the officials. In his eyes, Blake received the benefit of the doubt far too often, so Cousins called him an “actor,” who “is in L.A. where actors belong.”

“It hurts. It hurts so bad,” Griffin did not say, and never would say under any circumstances.

Not a terribly creative jab from Cousins, and not a terribly offensive one, either. At least not to Griffin, who actually did respond Saturday night after his Clippers beat the Kings for the second time this week.

“Well, I first heard about it from my acting coach. He sent me an e-mail and obviously he was thrilled. It was a complement. I guess he’s seen some commercials and stuff, so I appreciate it. Nah, I don’t care. I’m not into going back and forth and name calling players through the media and all that, just let it go.”

Griffin was then asked if his reaction to Cousins speaks to who he is as a player:

“I mean this in the nicest possible way. You have to consider the source. If this is somebody that’s really has been in the league a long time, and really knows the ins and outs of the game, and has a great reputation for carrying himself the right way, then it’s something I would kind of look at and be like I really rubbed this guy the wrong way, but someone like that you just keep going.”

Cousins was fined by the league for his comments about the way the officials treat Griffin after Thursday’s game, so wisely, he didn’t want to go down that road again on Saturday.

“I’m in enough trouble as it is. … It’s not a (personal) rivalry,” he told reporters afterward. “We’re just playing ball. They’re a playoff team and we’re not, so it’s not much of a rivalry.”

Neither Cousins nor Griffin play a style of basketball that is endearing to anyone but fans of their respective teams. Griffin’s act is a little more widely-accepted due to playing in the large market alongside Chris Paul, and of course for the sensational (if sometimes illegal) way he’s able to dunk over his opponents.

Cousins, meanwhile, has emerged as one of the better rebounders in the game in his young career, and you can see a time in the not too distant future when his overall game takes him to an All-Star level, as well. But his brooding on-court personality is something only his teammates could love, so expect the majority of fans to side with Griffin in this silly back-and-forth that hopefully, mercifully, and thankfully appears to be over.

Victor Oladipo’s practice dunk better than anything he – or maybe anyone – did in dunk contest (video)

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Victor Oladipo has grown into far more than just a dunker.

In fact, in Saturday’s dunk contest, he didn’t look like a dunker at all.

The Pacers star missed all three attempts of his first dunk, and a Black Panther mask was by far the biggest draw of his second. Oladipo was eliminated after the first round.

Maybe Dennis Smith Jr. wasn’t the only eliminated dunker who left something in his bag. This Oladipo dunk – 180 degrees, throwing ball off the backboard with his left hand while in mid-air, dunking with his right hand – while preparing in Los Angeles was awesome.

Larry Nance Jr. had the contest’s best dunk. This would have rivaled it.

Pelicans owner Tom Benson hospitalized with flu symptoms

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METAIRIE, La. (AP) — New Orleans Saints and Pelicans Owner Tom Benson has been hospitalized with flu symptoms.

A statement released Wednesday by the NFL and NBA clubs says their 90-year-old owner is resting comfortably at Ochsner Medical Center, a hospital which also serves as a major sponsor and which owns naming rights to the teams’ training headquarters.

Benson has owned the New Orleans Saints since 1985 and bought the New Orleans Pelicans in 2012.

In recent years, Benson has overhauled his estate plan so that his third wife, Gayle, would be first in line to inherit control of the two major professional franchises.

 

Report: Seattle hosting Kings-Warriors preseason game

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Kevin Durant spent his rookie season in Seattle, before the SuperSonics moved to Oklahoma City and became the Thunder. He has said Seattle fans deserved to see him grow up in the NBA after supporting his promising start.

They’ll get their chance.

Ailene Voisin of The Sacramento Bee:

The Kings and Golden State Warriors have scheduled a preseason game next season in Seattle, according to multiple league sources.

The Oct. 6 meeting between Northern California teams will be the first NBA game in the Key Arena since the Sonics moved to Oklahoma City after the 2007-08 season and became the Thunder.

This game will be loaded with storylines. Not only Durant, but the Kings considered moving to Seattle a few years ago. And of course, the return of NBA basketball to Seattle.

At some point, Seattle will get its own team again. For now, this preseason game creates intrigue there.

Report: Kawhi Leonard cleared medically, seeking second opinion

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Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said he’d be surprised if Kawhi Leonard played again this season, a stark reversal from just a month ago. Back then, even while announcing Leonard was out indefinitely with a quad injury, the San Antonio coach said Leonard wouldn’t miss the rest of the season.

What’s going on?

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

After spending 10 days before the All-Star break in New York consulting with a specialist to gather a second opinion on his right quad injury, All-NBA forward Kawhi Leonard bears the burden of determining when he’s prepared to play again, sources told ESPN.

Leonard has been medically cleared to return from the right quad tendinopathy injury, but since shutting down a nine-game return to the Spurs that ended Jan. 13, he has elected against returning to the active roster, sources said.

The uncertainty surrounding this season — and Leonard’s future which could include free agency in the summer of 2019 — has inspired a palpable stress around the organization, league sources said.

At first glance, this sounds like Derrick Rose five years ago. Even after he was cleared to play following a torn ACL, the then-Bulls star remained mysterious about when he’d suit up. His confidence in his physical abilities seemed to be a major issue, and he was never the same player since (suffering more leg injuries).

But the Spurs famously favor resting players to preserve long-term health. They seem unlikely to rush back Leonard. They might even sit players who want to play more often. And Leonard isn’t Rose.

Still, it’s clear something is amiss in San Antonio. Maybe not amiss enough to end Leonard’s tenure there, but the longer this lingers, the more time for tension to percolate.