Andrew Bynum’s “two steps up, one step back” dance with maturity continues

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I remember seeing Andrew Bynum as a 17-year-old at Summer League — then held in Long Beach, California — just weeks after being drafted. Two things stuck out to me at those games and interviews:

1) He and his game were so immature. Raw doesn’t even do his game justice. This was raw like sharks eating a seal. His footwook was non-existent as he took little hooks off the wrong foot and got pushed around in the post by the men who had come to earn a spot on an NBA roster. There were flashes of what was to come — his incredible length and potential were evident — but it was going to be a long road.

2) He was confident. He was convinced even then he would be the starting All-Star center one day. Early in his rookie year he said he hoped Kobe Bryant would still be playing at an All-Star level when he got there. He was sure he would grow to be the anchor of the Lakers front line.

Kevin Ding reminded me of this is a fantastic column at the Orange County Register Friday, which touches on the maturation of Bynum.

How does Andrew Bynum now compare to the Andrew Bynum the Lakers have employed the previous six years? The simple answer is that Bynum, 24, is rather the same yet critically better in all the most important ways.

Yes, there’s more edge, impatience and ego. (And those are some of things that swelled in Bryant over the years, no?)… We want it all now. If Bynum can score like a grown man now, he should act like one!

Well, all teams want their star players to be all things, and the reality is none of those guys are going to be. Deal with it, work with it and in some cases even cater to it to keep your star around for a chance to win.

Andrew Bynum’s edge has come out a lot in recent weeks — most recently in a silly ejection in the Lakers Friday night loss to the Rockets. He picked up an early technical and was clearly frustrated with physical play from Samuel Dalembert. The Lakers coaches warned him he had a tech and to keep his cool. But he couldn’t — after one play he jawed at the Rockets bench and the refs hit him with a second technical. He wasn’t there when the Lakers needed him late (his defense really wasn’t there all night, he had taken a mental vacation).

It was stupid — Bynum still puts himself ahead of his teammates. That is frustrating to Lakers fans and coaches, and certainly teammates.

But to suggest (as some have done) that Bynum hasn’t matured is a mistake. First and foremost, his game has matured. He worked hard to fill out his frame, he worked on drop steps, power moves and more until he is a deserving All-Star center. He even can throw in some threes at the end of quarters or the end of meaningless games — just not early in the shot clock in the third quarter of a tight game.

That is the next step in Bynum’s maturation — picking a time and place. There are times he can take a three and the Lakers coaches will not care. There are times to bark at the opposing bench and times to hold it in. Bynum hasn’t got that timing down.

But Bynum has grown up — he is a complex person, not a two-dimensional NBA player. You’ll be hard pressed to find a more avid reader in the league. He is thoughtful. To every game he wears an English Premiere League soccer jersey because he’s a fan. He is not a simple person.

He has matured. But it remains a “two steps up, one step back” process. As it did with me when I was 24, and it probably was with most of you. He just is doing it on a big stage under bright lights, and so we expect him not to make the mistakes we did.

That’s not going to happen. Mistakes will.

But in the end what is the Lakers real option? They have to pick up his option for next year and work to get him to sign a max extension to stay with the Lakers. He is their bridge to the future. Which gives Bynum real leverage in all this. And young people with leverage can be unpredictable.

Deal with it.

Jazz boost international bona fides with new minor-league coach

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Martin Schiller has been named coach of the Salt Lake City Stars, the Utah Jazz’s NBA G League affiliate.

Schiller previously served as an assistant coach of MHP Riesen Ludwigsburg in Germany and replaces Dean Cooper. He was an assistant coach for the Artland Dragons from 2010-15.

Schiller has also been an assistant coach on the German National Team since 2015, where he worked with Jazz assistant coach Alex Jensen.

Schiller hails from Vienna, Austria, and Stars vice president of basketball operations Bart Taylor lauded him for his international experience and player development background.

The Jazz organization is known to have close relationships with the international basketball community. The Jazz currently have eight international players.

Kyrie Irving will wear No. 11 with Celtics

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BOSTON (AP) — Newly acquired guard Kyrie Irving will wear No. 11 in Boston because the Celtics already have retired the numbers he wore in college and with the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Irving wore No. 11 at two New Jersey high schools before switching to No. 1 at Duke. He wore No. 2 with the Cavaliers for the first six years of his NBA career.

The Celtics retired No. 1 for founder and original owner Walter Brown. They retired No. 2 for former coach and general manager Red Auerbach.

In all, the Celtics have retired 21 numbers, with Paul Pierce’s No. 34 next in line for the TD Garden rafters.

 

PBT Extra: Cavaliers’ new GM aces first big test with Kyrie Irving trade

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Everyone in the NBA — heck, nearly everyone living in the Western hemisphere — knew Kyrie Irving wanted out of Cleveland. That should kill the Cavaliers’ leverage and make it hard to get enough quality back.

New GM Koby Altman — the guy thrust into the job when David Griffin was shown the door — pulled it off brilliantly.

That’s what I talk about in this new PBT Extra. With Isaiah Thomas and Jae Crowder, the Cavaliers remain the team to beat in the East this season. The Brooklyn Nets pick gives them flexibility going forward, whatever LeBron James decides to do next season.

First time at the plate in the big leagues and Altman crushed it to straight away center field.

Cavaliers-Celtics deal first offseason trade involving players who just met in NBA Finals or conference finals

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The Cavaliers and Celtics played in last year’s Eastern Conference finals. The teams were widely expected to meet there again.

Yet, Cleveland and Boston just completed a blockbuster trade – Kyrie Irving for Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic and the Nets’ 2018 first-round pick.

That seemed odd.

In fact, it’s unprecedented.

That is an incredible fact, one which speaks to LeBron Jamescachet. The Cavs are emphasizing this season, LeBron’s last before a player option, by loading up with veterans Thomas and Crowder. With LeBron still reigning in Cleveland, the Celtics are delaying their peak by acquiring the younger Irving.

Adding to the intrigue: the Cavs and Celtics are still favored to meet in this year’s conference finals. At minimum, they’ll face off in a(n even more) highly anticipated opening-night matchup.