Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Playoff impacts everywhere you look

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What you missed while getting drunk on peanut butter and jelly flavored vodka….

Heat 98, Thunder 93: Don’t read too much into “statements” before the playoffs start, but the Heat made one in one of our games of the night.

Lakers 113, Clippers 108: The Clippers had the big highlights, but the Lakers will take the win and likely the Pacific Division (and third seed) in our other game of the night.

Spurs 87, Celtics 86: Two veteran playoff teams put kept the Garden fans entertained in a close one… but when did Avery Bradley (19 points) become the best Celtic? For that matter, you could say Danny Green was the best Spur on the night (he had 14 and played good defense on Rajon Rondo). Stephen Jackson came off the bench for a good night for the Spurs. Be careful about saying this was a statement game of any kind — Boston scored 38 points in the second half, the Spurs 28 and both shot under 40 percent. This wasn’t pretty.

Mavericks 95, Grizzlies 85: Dallas used a 21-4 run in the fourth quarter to take the lead and get the win, a run sparked by Shawn Marion’s dozen in the final frame. Dirk Nowitzki had 23, Jason Terry changed the tone of the game with his 15 and energy off the bench. O.J. Mayo had 17 to lead the Grizzlies.

Raptors 99, Sixers 78: Philadelphia is just falling apart. The Sixers scored 15 points in the third quarter and 7 in the fourth, allowing Toronto to pull away behind Andrea Bargnani (24 on the night). Philly looked good in the first half (58 percent shooting) but a different team came out of the locker room for the second half. Which is starting to sound like the Sixers season.

Pacers 109, Wizards 96: Washington fell behind big early, fought back in the second and stayed close =until a 16-6 third quarter run by the Pacers broke the game open and from there the rout was on. Darren Collison had 17 points and 11 dimes, Danny Granger had 20 points. The Wizards traded Nick Young in part to get Jordan Crawford more run and he is responding, he had 28 in the loss.

Suns 107, Jazz 105: Utah went on a late 16-6 run in the fourth quarter to make this a close game and tied it on an Al Jefferson bucket, but Steve Nash hit the game winning bucket by splitting the defenders and hitting a 15-footer. With the win the Suns move to within a game Denver for the last playoff spot in the West and are now half a game ahead of the Jazz. Seven Suns scored in double figures. Paul Millsap had 25 for the Jazz.

Hawks 120, Bobcats 93: The Hawks shot 57 percent as a team. Good on them, but most of the reason for that falls on what the Bobcats call “defense.” This was over by halftime. Josh Smith had 24.

Hornets 94, Nuggets 92: Eric Gordon was back and he had 15 including the game-winning free throws after drawing the foul. They missed him so. The Hornets led pretty much the entire second half. If the Nuggets fall out of the playoffs by a game or so, they can look back to this one.

Warriors 97, Timberwolves 94: After the game Kevin Love said the Timberwolves deserved every boo they got. I say if you are booing the Timberwolves at home your perspective on what this team is right now is way, way out of line. Enjoy the improvement and support them. Love had 29, the Warriors took a night off from tanking behind David Lee’s 31.

Trail Blazers 101, Nets 88: LaMarcus Aldridge is better than Kris Humphries and dropped 24. Portland used a 16-1 run in the fourth quarter to take back the lead and pull away.

Bucks 107, Cavaliers 98: Milwaukee went on a 12-0 run in the first quarter to take the lead and never looked back. Monta Ellis dropped 30 and the Cavs had no answer for him.

NBA considering if jump-on-back foul should be flagrant foul

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The video above is an intentional foul — Chris Paul jumped on the back of Dwight Howard. The same thing has happened to Andre Drummond.

Is it a flagrant foul?

The Boston Celtics tweeted this out on Sunday.

The NBA was quick to let people know that this is just something under consideration — there has been no change in the rules. This may well be where the league is headed, but it’s not there yet.

The NBA defines a flagrant foul as “unnecessary contact committed by a player against an opponent.” To me, leaping on a player’s back like that qualifies. (A flagrant two foul is “unnecessary and excessive contact” and leads to an ejection; this is not that.)

Jared Dudley — one of the more vocal players on union issues — added a good point.

Consider this part of the coming changes on the intentional fouling rules period. But this one tweak could come much faster.

NBA: Foul on Cavaliers that sparked Celtics’ comeback called in error

Cleveland Cavaliers' J.R. Smith makes a move on Boston Celtics' Evan Turner (11) during the third quarter of a NBA basketball game in Boston Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)
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The Cavaliers were in great shape against the Celtics on Friday, leading by four points with seven seconds left.

Then, it all went so wrong for Cleveland.

J.R. Smith was called for fouling Evan Turner on a made layup, cutting the margin to two points. Turner missed the free throw, but the ball went out of bounds off the Cavs. Then, Avery Bradley made a buzzer-beating 3-pointer to give Boston the win.

Rewind, though, and an incorrect call drove the sequence, according to the NBA.

Smith shouldn’t have been called for fouling Turner, per the Last Two Minute Report:

Smith (CLE) makes incidental contact with Turner’s (BOS) body as he attempts the layup.

If this were officiated correctly, the Cavs would’ve had the ball and a two-point lead with 5.9 seconds left. That’s not a lock to win – they’d still have to inbound the ball and make their free throws – but it’s close.

Cleveland is definitely entitled to feel the refs wronged them out of a victory.

Report: Kevin Durant has “done his due diligence on the Bay Area”

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Kevin Durant has not made up his mind about what he will do as a free agent this summer. Until his playoff run ends, whenever that may be for the Thunder, his focus will be on bringing a title to Oklahoma City.

But even he admits he can’t help but think about free agency a little.

The buzz around the league is Golden State is at the front of the line if Durant decides to leave OKC, and he has done some research, reports Marc Spears of Yahoo Sports.

The Warriors play in front of an intimidating Oracle Arena crowd and are expected to debut a new San Francisco arena in 2019. Durant has quietly done his due diligence on the Bay Area, too, sources told Yahoo Sports.

His people — specifically agent Rich Kleiman and personal manager Charlie Bell — would be stupid not to have done some research on not only Golden State but on every other team he might consider: Houston, Miami, Washington, both teams in Los Angeles, the Knicks, and on down the line. Golden State, playing with Stephen Curry, certainly would have its attractions.

I’m still in the camp that Durant signs a 1+1 deal to stay in Oklahoma City (meaning he can opt out after one more season, in 2017), and it’s all about the cash. While he could get 30 percent of a $90 million cap this summer (about $27 million a season to start), with one more year of service in 2017 Durant could get 35 percent of $108 million ($37.8 million to start). That’s a lot of cash. Plus he gets one more chance at a ring with Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka, who both are 2017 free agents.

But you can be sure whatever Durant decides, it will be well researched and thought out. And he’s not going to announce it in a live special on ESPN.

Byron Scott expected to start D’Angelo Russell after All-Star break, but hasn’t talked to him about it

Byron Scott D'Angelo Russell
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Communication.

When we talk about Lakers’ coach Byron Scott’s questioned player development skills with young players Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson, and particularly D'Angelo Russell, it is his old-school lack of communication that comes into question. It’s what is different from what Gregg Popovich or Quin Snyder or other guys developing strong young players have done. From the outside (we’re not in practices/film sessions), we see Scott was not letting Russell play through mistakes — feeling that was rewarding bad behavior — but then not doing a good job communicating what the player is doing wrong.

This comment from Scott, via Mark Medina of the Los Angeles Daily News, sums it up perfectly.

Scott plans to start Russell after NBA All-Star weekend (Feb. 12-14). But Scott said the two have not talked about that issue.

“He’s not old enough for me to have a meeting and discuss, ‘What do you think?’” Scott said.

I would say you should have that meeting — it’s called a teachable moment. “What do you think? Well here is what I see that is different.”

Part of what is going on with Scott and Russell is the concern from some in the Lakers’ camp that Russell is a little too full of himself, that his ego is too big, and it could become a problem. So they are trying to take him down a peg. I would say that for a smart player — and Russell is that — the game is humbling and will take care of the ego issue. But you’ve got to give him run to develop him.

Play him, and then communicate with him. It’s a system that does worth with modern players.