Bulls owner was willing to go into luxury tax to get Pau Gasol… generous bajillionaire he is

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So that Pau-Gasol-to-Chicago rumor before the dealing fell apart pretty quick because, to be honest, the idea of anyone saying “Heck yeah, we want Carlos Boozer!” right now is like the joke in a trailer for one of those teen romcoms. You know it’s coming and though it is technically humorous, it’s not actually funny. But ESPN.com’s Marc Stein reported Friday that the Bulls were so serious about it, they were willing to give the most serious commitment their organization can. It was willing to go into the luxury tax.

Gasp!

From ESPN.com:

Chicago’s talks with the Los Angeles Lakers regarding Pau Gasol before the trade deadline never got too far, largely because the Lakers had no interest in taking back Carlos Boozer … and because the Bulls weren’t about to find a third team willing to join the talks to absorb the three years and $47 million remaining on Boozer’s deal to help Chicago get the Spaniard.

File this away, though.

Sources with knowledge of Chicago’s thinking told ESPN.com that Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf was prepared last week to go into the luxury tax if necessary if a legit trade scenario involving Gasol had materialized.

via Weekend Dime — Scouts on Lakers, Knicks and more – ESPN.

For those that don’t know, this is a really big deal. Despite consistently being one of the most profitable teams as the owner of Jordan’s former and Rose’s current club in a large market, Reinsdorf basically acts like paying the tax is pulling teeth. So maybe, if things went really well, he’d consider paying the tax if he were to get one of the top five big men in the NBA. That’s just swell. Reinsdorf has been pushing the “maybe I’ll pay the tax!” line for a while. This is from November:

Chicago Bulls Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf on Wednesday reiterated through a team spokesman that he would give strong consideration to incurring the luxury tax if the player acquisition gave the team a reasonable chance to win a championship.

That answer is similar in sentiment to Reinsdorf’s response on the subject from a 2009 interview. However, with a more punitive luxury tax poised to take effect in 2013-14 of the pending 10-year collective bargaining agreement, as well as increased revenue sharing, the question applied anew.

via Reinsdorf: Luxury tax won’t preclude Bulls’ bid for key addition – Chicago Tribune.

This actually may show more about the Bulls’ realization regarding Boozer than anything. With Rose’s extension kicking into high gear next season and with the luxury tax rates set to raise to painful levels in two seasons, the Bulls are probably starting to understand that giving Boozer his huge deal may have been, oh, what’s the word, a complete and total disaster.

Which is a bit of an exaggeration. Look, Tom Thibodeau has found a way to make Boozer a competent member of an elite defense. Boozer’s ability to hit the mid-range jumper is something the Bulls have needed for years and that Joakim Noah will probably never have consistently. Is he overpaid? Sure. But in a few years, Kobe Bryant will be, too. These are pretty standard problems. At least Reinsdorf is saying that if the team is good enough and worthy of the investment he’ll make it, even if that belies the obscene amount of money he makes off the team anyway.

And if you think no one will take Boozer, I would ask that you look around the league and witness the kind of deals which have been moved over the past three seasons. There’s always a sucker out there somewhere.

Report: Clippers take Chris Paul-to-Spurs rumor ‘very seriously’

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Want to laugh off that Chris Paul-to-Spurs rumor?

The Clippers aren’t joining you.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

The Clippers should be concerned. Losing Paul would unravel their entire foundation, dropping them from the fringe of championship contention to out of the title picture completely. It could even help usher out Blake Griffin, who will also be an unrestricted free agent this summer. (To be fair, Paul leaving could also help convince Griffin to stay.)

About a month ago, the Clippers reportedly expected Paul to stay. They even reportedly struck a verbal agreement with him to re-sign before that. But they can’t officially sign him until July, and that leaves the door open for him to leave.

The Clippers should be heartened by their advantages – a prime market and a projected max offer of $205 million over five years.

The most another team projects to be able to offer is $152 million over four years, and San Antonio will have a hard time doing that. Even if they trim their roster to Kawhi Leonard, LaMarcus Aldridge, Pau Gasol, Danny Green and Tony Parker, the Spurs would still have to shed two of those players to clear max cap space.

So, never say never, but the Clippers’ concern might be rooted more in the dire consequences of Paul leaving rather than the likelihood of it.

Report: Raptors, Magic can’t trade with each other for a year

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The Magic will send the Raptors a 2018 second-round pick for hiring Jeff Weltman, who was Toronto’s general manager.

But that’s not the only consequence of hire.

Yahoo Sports:

The move invoked the NBA provision that Toronto and Orlando are not permitted to trade players with each other until the earlier of May 24, 2018, or the conclusion of the 2017-18 season for either organization, league sources told The Vertical’s Shams Charania.

The NBA made a similar ruling when the Clippers sent the Celtics a first-rounder to hire Doc Rivers, and I don’t like it now, either. It’s needlessly restrictive, preventing talent from flowing to the optimal locations.

At least Orlando isn’t a logical destination for the Raptor most likely to be dealt: Jonas Valanciunas. The Magic already have enough centers with Nikola Vucevic and Bismack Biyombo – a lesson that influenced their last trade with Toronto, dealing Serge Ibaka.

2017 NBA playoffs have been historically uncompetitive

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The NBA Finals so many wanted to see – Cavaliers-Warriors III – is here.

At least it will be.

Today is the first of six off days before the 2017, which begin June 1 in Oakland.

The lengthy delay is the product of an underwhelming postseason featuring few competitive series and numerous blowouts.

Golden State swept its way through the West, and Cleveland dropped only one game (to the Celtics in the conference finals) while winning the East. There have been only two Game 7s, but considering the magnitude, neither felt that compelling. Blake Griffin‘s injury undercut the Clippers against the Jazz, and Celtics over Wizards felt inevitable with home teams winning each game of the series. Between, there have been several lackluster games and series.

There have been just 74 playoff games this year – the fewest before the Finals since since the NBA instituted a best-of-seven first round in 2003:

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That’s 74 of a possible 98 games – 76%, the lowest since 1999 and seventh-lowest ever.

Even if the Finals go seven games, it will be the fewest games in a postseason since 2007. If the Finals go five or fewer games, it’ll be the shortest postseason in this playoff format.

And it hasn’t just been quantity. The quality of games has been lacking, too.

Though there were more blowouts last year by nearly any measure, the 2017 postseason’s average margin in pre-Finals games (13.5) is fifth-highest all-time and second-highest since 1959 (behind 2016, 14.2).

Combine the two factors, and these are the drabbest playoffs in nearly 50 years. Here’s each postseason plotted by average margin in pre-Finals games and percentage of possible games pre-Finals:

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This probably just confirms what you’ve seen: The 2017 playoffs have been in a rut.

We’re all counting on the Cavaliers and Warriors to salvage this postseason, but considering how deep the hole is, anything less than an epic Finals probably won’t cut it.

Kyrie Irving crosses over Avery Bradley, hits 3-pointer (video)

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Avery Bradley got around one screen then, thanks to Kyrie Irving‘s excellent ball-handling, lunged at another that wasn’t coming as Irving hit a 3-pointer.