Miami Heat's Udonis Haslem drives to the basket against the Phoenix Suns in the first half during their NBA basketball game in Miami

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Heat hotter than the Suns

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What you missed while wondering why someone whose job it was to smuggle cocaine into the United States would get the personalized license plate “SMUGLER”

Heat 99, Suns 95: It looked like the Suns had a road upset in their pocket — they led most of the fourth quarter and were up 10 with just more than 7 minutes to go. Then LeBron James checked into the game and Miami went on a 17-0 run. It was the kind of awesome display of team defense, fast breaks and shot making that no team in the league can match. The Heat played some defense, the Suns made just two baskets from the field in the final seven minutes.

Chris Bosh was the best Heat player on the night, especially early when he scored 11 of Heat’s first 13 points on his way to 29. Credit should go to the Suns, they are playing well as a team right now. Grant Hill had 19 to lead them but it was really the Suns bench that was strong, led by Markieff Morris and his dozen.

Knicks 106, Raptors 97: Four wins in a row for the Knicks under Mike Woodson, and the Knicks are doing it with the kind of balance (four starters with 17 points or more) that Mike D’Antoni wanted but could not get the Knicks to execute. Jeremy Lin has not faded into oblivion, he had 18 points and has played a few good games in a row. They are playing good defense.

The real test is Wednesday night against the division leading 76ers.

Pacers 102, Clippers 89: Depth matters in a shortened season. The stars get the headlines — Danny Granger played well and had 25, Blake Griffin attacked since the Pacers chose not to double him and had 14 points in the first quarter, 23 for the contest — but that’s not who decided this game. Rather, it was Tyler Hansbrough with 17 points and the kind of effort that got under the Clippers skin. Lou Amundson was out working the Clippers, too. That was the difference.

Rockets 107, Lakers 104: No Kyle Lowry, no Kevin Martin, no problem. The Rockets had Goran Dragic (16 points, 13 dimes), and who do the Lakers have who can match that? This is a game played at the Rockets tempo (faster than the Lakers like) but Los Angeles adjusted well early and put up 40 first-quarter points behind a dozen from Pau Gasol. They were up 15 and led most of the game. But the Rockets went on a late 23-6 run to come back and take the lead. Kobe Bryant (29 points on 27 shots) hit a couple clutch shots to tie it, but then Dragic nailed the corner three off a Courtney Lee assist and Kobe missed the shots to match that. (By the way, Gasol looks like the guy late on the close out on Dragic’s game winner, but that was Metta World Peace’s man on the play and he completely leaves him to go into the paint and go after Lee. Gasol just left his man to try and help when he realized what was happening.)

Mike Brown had the Lakers playing good defense early in the season but they only do that in spurts now. Also, Andrew Bynum got ejected in the third quarter and the Lakers missed him late because it became Kobe hero ball time.

Jazz 97, Thunder 90: Phoenix and Utah are really putting on a push for those last playoff seeds in the West and a chance to maybe face the Thunder in the first round. And Utah would not be an easy out. The Jazz took the lead on a 14-1 run in the second quarter and never gave it back. The real key in this game was the Jazz owned the paint at both ends, outscoring the Thunder 50-20. Also, the Thunder had 20 turnovers. Paul Millsap had 20 to lead six Jazz players in double figures. The Thunder can write that off as just one of those games if they want, but they’ve had a few of those lately and are 5-5 in their last 10. We have kind of ordained them to come out of the West in the playoffs, but they are not playing like that right now.

Bucks 116, Blazers 87: Two teams going in opposite directions — the Bucks have now won six in a row while the Blazers have come apart at the seams and are basically tanking the rest of the season. The Bucks are scrapping and playing aggressive defense — they had 10 steals in this game, and according to Bucks PR they are the first team to have 10 steals or more in three straight games in nine seasons. The Bucks started the second quarter on an 11-1 run and pulled away from there. Drew Gooden had 19 to lead six Bucks in double figures (Monta Ellis had 14, if you were wondering).

Kings 119, Grizzlies 110: The Kings are a good team if you let them get out and run, and this was an up-tempo game. Marcus Thornton had 31 on 22 shots, Tyreke Evans came off the bench but played when it mattered and had 9 of his 13 in the fourth quarter. Isaiah Thomas also had 9 in the fourth and finished with 18.

Hornets coach Steve Clifford suggests allowing teams to advance ball in final two minutes without timeout

Steve Clifford
AP Photo/Chuck Burton
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The final minutes of a close NBA game rank among the best moments in sports – which is pretty remarkable, considering frequent stoppages interrupt and impede enjoyment of the game.

Clutch play. Timeout. Clutch play. Timeout. Clutch play. Timeout.

Coaches should probably call fewer timeouts, because drawing up a play also allows the defense to set. But timeouts give the offense the option of advancing the inbound spot into the frontcourt, a key advantage. So, teams will keep calling timeouts.

Unless…

Steve Aschburner of NBA.com:

For Charlotte’s Steve Clifford, the ability in the final two minutes of a game to advance the ball without requiring a timeout to be called could speed up the action. That has been used on a trial basis in the D League and in Summer League, and several coaches felt it worked well.

“The game is at an all-time high in popularity, but a lot of people complain about the last two minutes,” Clifford said. “I think it would add a different dimension but it would also be a good thing in addressing our biggest issue.”

Not that the coaches would be willing to lose any of their timeouts, though. They just wouldn’t save them specifically for that purpose.

I’m here for that.

I’m unsurprised control-seeking coaches want to keep all their timeouts, and reducing those seems unlikely, anyway. The NBA pays its bills through commercial breaks.

Would moving those advertising opportunities earlier in the game pay off? Audiences are probably larger in crunch time, but an action-packed closing stretch could hook fans and grow overall audiences. It’s always a difficult decision to forgo maximizing immediate revenue in pursuit of more later.

But I’m fairly certain fans would appreciate the change, which is at least a starting point in considering it.

Kyrie Irving feels validated after hitting game-winning shot to bring title to Cleveland

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Back in July during the pre-Olympics USA Camp in Las Vegas, I asked Kyrie Irving what had changed for him, what was different for him after winning an NBA title. His answer was about the doors it opened, the possibilities that suddenly felt available to him. A month after winning the title he still seemed a little overwhelmed by the experience, and he hadn’t fully processed it yet. Which is completely understandable.

Now, as training camp is set to open for the Cavaliers and their defense of that title, Irving clearly has gotten used to being a champion — and he feels validated. Look at what he told Joe Varden of the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

“Yes, my life’s changed drastically,” Irving told cleveland.com Saturday, during Irving’s friendship walk and basketball challenge downtown for Best Buddies, Ohio — an organization that gives social growth and employment opportunities to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

“It’s kind of, you’re waiting for that validation from everyone, I guess, to be considered one of the top players in the league at the highest stage,” Irving said. “That kind of changed. I was just trying to earn everyone’s respect as much as I could.”

It’s amazing to think of the impact one shot — Irving’s three over Stephen Curry with 53 seconds left in Game 7 — can have. If he misses, there is less pressure on the Warriors to answer with a three, maybe they come down and get a bucket inside for two (one could argue they should have done that anyway rather than hunt for the three), from there maybe the Warriors win. If so, that could change everything from Kevin Durant‘s summer plans to what the Cavaliers’ roster looks like today — there’s a good chance Cleveland’s lineup would have changed if they lost to the Warriors two Finals in a row.

One shot can have that kind of impact on a player, too.

Kyrie Irving was one of the top five point guards in the NBA for a while, a score first guy but one who had some floor general in him and got some steals. A lot of time seemed to be spent focusing on his flaws defensively and passing. But with that shot, he feels validated. If he carries that confidence into next season, the Cavaliers just got better.

Check out top 50 plays from Kevin Garnett’s Hall of Fame career (VIDEO)

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First Kobe Bryant. Then Tim Duncan.

Now Kevin Garnett. The Hall of Fame class in five years is going to be stacked.

But before we move on from Garnett’s announcement this week that he is retiring after 21 years in the NBA, let’s look back at his greatest plays (compiled by the folks at NBA.com). Enjoy this for 11 minutes rather than watching your NFL fantasy team flounder. Again.

D’Angelo Russell said he used to play as Luke Walton on NBA 2K; Stephen Jackson calls that crap

LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 30: D'Angelo Russell #1 of the Los Angeles Lakers speaks during a news conference to discuss the controversy with teammate Nick Young before the start of the NBA game against the Miami Heat at Staples Center March 30, 2016, in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using the photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
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Did anyone ever fire up NBA 2K9 back in the day, decide to be the soon-to-be-champion Lakers, look at a roster with Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol, and Lamar Odom then say “I’m going to be Luke Walton”?

D'Angelo Russell says he did.

The Lakers young point guard has praised the new Laker coach at every turn — Russell and Byron Scott did not get along, the point guard is much happier now — and that includes talking about Walton’s playing days to Kevin Ding of Bleacher Report.

“I told him I remember playing with him on (NBA) 2K; I used to always play as him. I’m a fan. I’m definitely a fan. Because he was a point forward. I can’t speak on Elgin Baylor and all those guys, but my era, I know he was a point forward.”

Really? NBA veteran and current analyst Stephen Jackson called Russell out on that.

Jackson has a point.