Monta Ellis, Chris Singleton

Warriors reach deal to send Ellis to Bucks for Bogut, Jackson


What happened to the Golden State franchise that would only trade Monta Ellis to Orlando if they got Dwight Howard back? This isn’t that.

In the first of the deadline trades this year, Golden State will send Ellis, Ekpe Udoh and Kwame Brown to the Milwaukee Bucks for Andrew Bogut and Stephen Jackson. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo broke the story, which has since been confirmed by multiple sources.

I don’t love this for either team, but I think it could be the start of some good things in Milwaukee.

I don’t get it at all for Golden State. The Warriors have been desperate in their search for a center and when healthy Andrew Bogut is one of the top five true centers in the league — but he has not been fully healthy for more than two seasons. Bogut suffered a serious elbow injury that caused him to miss the playoffs two seasons ago and led to a serious drop in shooting production last year (which he missed the first quarter of due to the injury and multiple surgeries). This season it was more of the same before he fractured his ankle, keeping him out at least until the playoffs start.

Stephen Jackson, who was in Scott Skiles doghouse in Milwaukee, will return to the Bay Area, where he had his best seasons and was a fan favorite. But he is not the same player now.

For Golden State, this is really a gamble on Bogut’s health. And Stephen Curry, who is now the unquested leader of this team but with a bum ankle. Also, for a team that wants to be known for defense I don’t really like this move.

The Bucks wanted to move on from Bogut and do well to add a prolific scorer from the perimeter in Monta Ellis, a guy who loves to run and is a fearless gunner. Their offense has been terrible for a couple seasons now and Ellis will score them points. It can help them as they fight for one of the final playoff spots in the East.

But a Brandon Jennings/Ellis backcourt on a Scott Skiles coached team? That is a potential minefield.

By getting Udoh, the Bucks get a defensive center for the future. Skiles will like that and he is young.

My question for the Bucks is what kind of team do they want to be, and is Skiles the guy to coach that team? They have the potential to run and have a high-scoring backcourt with Ellis and Jennings, but they have to really turn them loose.

I like what Milwaukee did here as a first step, this was a good haul for them for an injured center. The Warriors are really rolling the dice on both the health of Bogut and  Curry. Not sure I love those odds.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.