New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin and Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony looks on against the Atlanta Hawks in the second quarter of their NBA basketball game at Madison Square Garden in New York

Baron Davis could eventually replace Jeremy Lin as Knicks starting point guard


As the media were allowed into Knicks practice on Friday, they saw something unexpected: Jeremy Lin and Baron Davis playing on the floor together, on the same team, with the rest of the starting unit during a scrimmage.

It’s certainly an interesting idea, and one that would be even more interesting to see in a real game situation. Beyond that, all it does is fire up the rumor mill, as Marc Berman of the New York Post explains:

D’Antoni has called Lin and Davis a potential “two-headed monster,’’ but his experimenting yesterday raised eyebrows, especially amid rumblings Davis could supplant Lin as starting point guard in April.

The Knicks front office probably would not want to see Lin lose his starting job because he has become a marketing cash cow for the organization on the sale of Linsanity shirts alone.

If Davis, who has played just four games after sitting out nearly two months because of a herniated disk, progresses to a very high level, the two-time All-Star could squeeze into the starting lineup at the expense of shooting guard Landry Fields with Lin playing off the ball.

Now, before Knicks fans head to the ledge of their nearest tall building, this isn’t implying that Davis would replace Lin in the starting lineup, or even gobble up any of Lin’s minutes. It’s just speculation that Davis, who plays at a slower pace and theoretically has more experience running an NBA offense, might have the ball in his hands more, with Lin being asked to score a little more and play (at times) without the ball to begin possessions.

The part about the Knicks front office not wanting to see Lin play with the reserves because of marketing and financial reasons is, frankly, just plain false. Whether Lin starts or comes off the bench isn’t relevant; his presence on this team has been cemented with his consistently stellar play. And, winning games and getting back to the playoffs will bring more money and positive attention to the franchise than the feel-good Lin story — which has already calmed down quite a bit, by the way — ever could.

Besides, that’s not even what we’re talking about.

D’Antoni is simply experimenting with adjusting Lin’s role, while trying to allow Davis to get more minutes alongside the team’s top talent — in practice, mind you, which is the place do such things. He’s going to try every combination possible to get the most from his roster, and rumors and speculation about what that might mean for Lin isn’t going to change that.

Barack Obama picks Warriors to win title. Like everyone else.

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The Baller and Chief is on his way out the door.

Barack Obama has been by far the biggest hoops fan to inhabit the White House (with John Quincy Adams a very distant second). He’s put up a basketball court at the White House, filled out NCAA Tournament brackets, jokingly applied for the Wizards’ coaching job, thought about becoming an owner, gone to NBA games, and just been a fan like the rest of us.

And he’s picking the Warriors to win it all. Like everyone else.

In what was primarily a “get out the vote” effort, President Obama called in to ‘Sway in the Morning’ hosted by Sway Calloway on Eminem’s SiriusXM channel Shade 45. Asked to pick the next NBA champ, the Bulls fan went exactly where everyone else did — Golden State.

“I’m going to go with the Warriors just because of [Kevin] Durant, that addition. I think they just have too much firepower,” Obama said. “Although they just got spanked in their first game, so it will take a while to figure things out.”

Obama also picked the Patriots to win the NFL title. He’s such a frontrunner.

Report: NBA owners rejecting expansion ‘at every turn’

Seattle SuperSonics v Denver Nuggets
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With rumors of NBA expansion swirling, it’s time to look at more concrete evidence.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver has repeatedly shot down expansion talk, and that’s not him going rogue. His bosses have apparently taken a firm stance.

Steve Kyler of Basketball Insiders:

Basketball Insiders reached out to an NBA owner and a voting member of the Board of Governors and was told flatly that any talk of expansion has been shot down at every turn inside the Board of Governors meetings. It’s been a non-starter.

There is a theoretical one-time expansion fee so high where the current 30 owners would divide their shares of revenue further. But the NBA takes in so much annually, it’s hard to imagine a new ownership group could and would front enough money.

Sorry, Seattle (and Louisville and Las Vegas and…). The evidence is overwhelmingly on the side of the league staying at 30 teams. You’ll probably just have to poach a team from another city.

Greg Oden on basketball career: ‘It’s over’

Indiana Pacers v Miami Heat - Game 6
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Greg Oden’s multiple injuries dictated the former No. 1 pick wouldn’t have the career forecasted for him.

But he returned from three years off an NBA court to play for the Heat in 2014. He followed that breakthrough with a couple tryouts and a stint in China.

Could he once again return to the league?

Dana Hunsinger Benbow of IndyStar:

Asked whether he’d play basketball again, he said, “I wish. It’s over.” Instead, he is back with the Buckeyes as a student coach, helping out the players and Matta any way he can.

Oden, who was picked one spot before Kevin Durant, once declared: “I know I’m one of the biggest busts in NBA history and I know that it’ll only get worse as Kevin Durant continues doing big things.” That statement is blunt, reality and sad all wrapped into one.

It’s a shame we never got to see Oden healthy for long. There was good reason for the Trail Blazers to pick him first, but injuries ruined what could’ve been an intriguing extend debate over him and Durant.

Hopefully, Oden finds fulfillment in the next chapter of his life.

Report: LeBron James didn’t want to play for Cavaliers before they drafted him

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The Cavaliers landing the No. 1 pick in the 2003 NBA draft seemed like a fairytale.

The consensus top choice and one of the most-hyped prospects of all-time was a local kid from nearby Akron, LeBron James.

But this happy accident didn’t come through rainbows and butterflies. To get the top seed in the lottery, Cleveland had to get bad – really bad. The Cavs missed the playoffs five straight years, bottoming out at 17-65 in 2002-03.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

When James was a teenager, he started attending games at the arena, and he couldn’t believe how bad the Cavs were, how empty the arena often was, with its bright blue seats seeming like a neon sign of disinterest. During his senior year of high school, he went to several games, was given courtside seats and visited the locker room. His thought was pretty clear after he watched that 17-win team with the lowest attendance in the league: They were awful, and he didn’t want to be a part of it.

Can we be surprised someone who grew up in Akron, Ohio, as a Bulls, Yankees and Cowboys fan didn’t want to join the Cavs? LeBron was a frontrunner.

What he didn’t realize at the time: He’d gain the power to singlehandedly transform a franchise, and he’d develop an emotional attachment to the Cavaliers.

Cleveland wasn’t going to remain unwatchable with him. He turned the Cavs into a credible championship contender. Then, after leaving for the Heat, he returned. He even delivered delivered its long-awaited title last season.

The tears of joy he cried afterward show just how much that area, including its NBA team, means to him.

That he was initially sour on the Cavaliers adds an interesting twist to the story. It doesn’t detract from it.