Derrick Rose, Taj Gibson, Ronnie Brewer, Joakim Noah

Baseline to Baseline recaps: Bulls look every bit the contender

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What you missed while realizing that it’s time to turn off the autocorrect on your phone before someone gets hurt….

Bulls 96, Spurs 89: That is why the Chicago Bulls are contenders. They played a fantastic game behind Derrick Rose, who had 29 points and made all the big plays at the end, including a pull up jumper and a pretty floater off the glass. However it was Luol Deng who knocked down the dagger jumper at the end off some pretty ball movement by the Bulls when the Spurs defense focused on Rose. The Bulls also attacked the Spurs up front, where San Antonio is weakest. Tim Duncan had 18 points but needed 21 shots to get there.

San Antonio took an early lead, fell back and mounted a charge at the end as good teams will do. The Bulls were able to hold them off behind Rose. Yes, no Manu Ginobili, but if you beat the Spurs in San Antonio you’ve got a quality win.

Bulls fans had their hearts in their throats when Rose was on the floor clutching his knee at one point — there was a knee-on-knee collision with Tony Parker, but both eventually walked away from it.

Magic 102, Wizards 95: With the Wizards on the second night of a back-to-back it looked like the Magic would run away and hide, getting up 17 in the first quarter. But the Magic took their foot off the gas and credit the Wizards for fighting back and actually leading for a chunk of the third quarter (Washington started the second half on a 10-0 run). Orlando came back because they hit 10-of-15 threes in the second half, led by Ryan Anderson who had 11 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter, plus he had 15 boards. John Wall had 33 to lead the Wizards.

Thunder 92, Sixers 88: Philly looked like they were going to steal this one until the Thunder closed the game on a 12-1 run and took the win. This was the kind of closeout win on the road you see contenders make. The key stat in this one — Oklahoma City grabbed the offensive rebound on 42.2 percent of their missed shots (19 total, seven by guard Russell Westbrook). Kevin Durant had 23.

Celtics 102, Bucks 96: That was a vintage Kevin Garnett performance — 25 points, 10 boards and he was a force on defense. Rajon Rondo had 15 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists, his third triple-double of the year. Boston owned this game after a big third quarter and was up 17 in the fourth — but a late 13-0 run by the Bucks made this one very tight at the end. Ersan Ilyasova continued his strong play of late with 25 points.

Warriors 85, Hawks 82: The Hawks shot 33.7 percent as a team, “led” by Josh Smith who was 5-of-20 and couldn’t hit a jumper to save his life. You think that was because of the Warriors 26th ranked defense? Exactly. Monta Ellis had 24 points but needed 27 shots to get there, David Lee had 22 points and 12 rebounds.

Knicks 120, Cavaliers 103: Cleveland was in control in the first half of this game and led by as many as 17. Rookie Kyrie Irving was looking good controlling play, Antwan Jamison had a dozen in the first quarter and Daniel Gibson had 10 in the second. But in the third quarter the Knicks exploded for 33 points, played fantastic defense (led by Tyson Chandler) and took the lead back. The Knicks bench continued that in the second and they pulled away for the win. Carmelo Anthony had 22 points, Jeremy Lin had 19 and 13 assists.

Grizzlies 96, Mavericks 85: Dirk Nowitzki left the game in the second quarter with a minor back injury and did not return. (He is expected to be available on Friday.) When he is not in to hold it together, the entire Mavericks offense falls apart, and they lose. Marc Gasol had 22 points and 11 boards for Memphis.

Pistons 109, Bobcats 94: In a battle of bad teams, the Bobcats prove they are worse than anyone in the league this year.

Raptors 95, Hornets 84: Toronto can play pretty good defense at times and they held the Hornets to 37.5 percent shooting (39.4 percent eFG%). Do that and you win. DeMar DeRozan and Linas Kleiza each had 21 for the Raptors — good to see from DeRozan after coach Dwane Casey benched him in the fourth last game. DeRozan sparked an 11-1 fourth quarter run that was key for the Raptors in this one.

Nuggets 104, Trail Blazers 95: Ty Lawson was back and had 18 points, but it was great play from Kenneth Faried down the stretch that helped Denver hold on for this win.

Jazz 104, Rockets 83: The night after the looked so good, the Rockets came out and shot 39.1 percent and just were unimpressive. C.J. Miles had a monster game with 27 points and Devin Harris continues to try to up his trade value with 19 points on just 11 shots.

Lakers 104, Timberwolves 85: The Lakers front line is tough to contain as it is, but take Kevin Love out of the equation — he missed this one with the cover-all excuse of “flu like symptoms” — the Timberwolves didn’t really stand much of a chance. Andrew Bynum had 13 and 13, while Pau Gasol owned the third quarter (11 points in that frame) when the Lakers pulled away. Kobe Bryant had 31 and if he shoots like this he should wear a mask every game. Note to Mike Brown: Sit your star starters at the end of blowout games. What exactly are you trying to do?

51Q: How quickly will the Lakers’ young core progress?

Los Angeles Lakers' D'Angelo Russell, left, poses with with Jordan Clarkson (6) during the team's NBA basketball media day in El Segundo, Calif., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
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We continue PBT’s 2016-17 NBA preview series, 51 Questions. For the past few weeks, and through the start of the NBA season, we tackle 51 questions we cannot wait to see answered during the upcoming NBA season. We will delve into one almost every day between now and the start of the season.

D'Angelo Russell, Jordan Clarkson and Julius Randle placed somewhere between promising and good for their ages last season.

None of that is to say plain “good.”

When Russell, Clarkson and Randle shared the court, the Lakers scored fewer points per possession than the NBA’s worst offense and allowed more points per possession than the league’s worst defense. In all, those units got outscored by a dreadful 16.0 points per 100 possessions. A teenage Brandon Ingram, the draft’s No. 2 pick, is unlikely to swing fortunes quickly.

Ingram (19), Russell (20), Randle (21) and Clarkson (24) carry significant value, but little of it is tied to their ability to produce right now. When will that change?

It’s important to acknowledge reality of the present before setting expectations for the future.

Here’s how each core piece ranked in ESPN’s Real Plus-Minus last season:

  • Russell: 69th among 82 point guards
  • Clarkson: 119th among 175 guards
  • Randle: 90th among 93 power forwards

Russell ranked in just the 36th percentile in points per possession when finishing a play as pick-and-roll ball-handler. With Russell guarding, his man shot 47%.

Clarkson’s man shot even better, 48%. Not limited to defense, Clarkson has yet to turn any skill in his all-around game into a major asset.

For all the hype about his ball-handling and passing, Randle turned the ball over more than he assisted baskets last season. He also blocked fewer shots than Jeremy Lamb, a shooting guard who played more than 1,000 fewer minutes.

Ingram is a skinny teenager. Like most rookies, he’ll face growing pains as he jumps to the NBA.

These players have a long way to go – and that’s fine. Time is on their side.

The Thunder once went 23-59 with Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. LeBron James missed the playoffs his first two seasons. Even Michael Jordan spent his first three years on losing teams.

Simply, young teams rarely win in the NBA. At least a modicum of experience is crucial.

But don’t assume these young Lakers are destined for success.

At one point, Charlotte thought it had something with Emeka Okafor (No. 2 pick, Rookie of the Year in 2005), Raymond Felton (No. 5 pick, All-Rookie second team in 2006) and Adam Morrison (No. 3 pick, All-Rookie second team in 2007).

Drafting highly touted players who produce immediately doesn’t guarantee long-term success.

If the Lakers look at the bigger picture, they’ll monitor their young core’s development and proceed as they gain more information. They won’t overreact to the most likely outcome: another losing season.

It could be another year or two or even three until Russell, Clarkson, Ingram and Randle ascend into playoff contention. As long as they show progress, that’s OK. Those four should be graded on a curve for their age.

The Lakers might be in a good place if they don’t get in their own way. But with a fan base accustomed to championship contention and a front office on a self-imposed deadline to advance in the playoffs, do you trust he Lakers to remain patient?

DeMarre Carroll considers this his first season with Raptors

TORONTO, ON - MAY 15:  DeMarre Carroll #5 of the Toronto Raptors dribbles the ball in the first half of Game Seven of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals against the Miami Heat during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Air Canada Centre on May 15, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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BURNABY, British Columbia (AP) — DeMarre Carroll is ready to start over.

A prized free-agent acquisition for the Toronto Raptors last year, Carroll played only 26 regular-season games because of a right knee injury that had to be surgically repaired in January.

The small forward worked hard to rejoin the club in time for Toronto’s run to the NBA’s Eastern Conference finals, but wasn’t the same player the Raptors signed to be difference-maker from the Atlanta Hawks.

And while not yet 100 percent after a month of rest followed by a strenuous summer of rehabilitation, Carroll is looking forward to hitting the reset button.

“I look at it as basically my first season (with Toronto),” the 30-year-old Carroll said as the Raptors opened training camp this week. “A new season, a new beginning. I’ve just got to come in and get back to playing DeMarre Carroll basketball when I’m healthy.”

Apart from locking up DeMar DeRozan to a long-term contract and bringing in Jared Sullinger, the Raptors had a relatively quiet break.

However, finally having a healthy Carroll would be a major bonus for a club looking to take the next step.

“A big difference,” DeRozan said. “It was tough for us last year to figure out ways to play without him. Even when he was playing early on he was hurt (and) even when came back he wasn’t his full self and we still managed to make history.

“To have him back at the start of camp, start of preseason, to be able to implement him fully is going to give us everything that we’ve been searching for.”

The 6-foot-8, 215-pound Carroll only returned to the court for live action last week, and said his offseason regimen included making sure all the proper steps were taken to ensure his knee is ready for the season.

“We took a hard approach about it and we did it the right way,” said Carroll, who took a month off after the playoffs in hopes of reducing the swelling. “Last season it was more of a rush, trying to get me back. We didn’t go through the whole thing we needed to go through to get the knee to where it needs to be. I feel that we’re on the right track.”

Carroll, who averaged 11.4 points and 4.7 rebounds last season, came through the first two days of camp unscathed for the Raptors, who open their exhibition schedule on Saturday at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena against the Golden State Warriors.

“(The team) has talked about bringing me along slowly, not trying to kill myself in pre-season,” Carroll said. “Just be ready and healthy for the first game of the season.”

Raptors coach Dwane Casey said Carroll’s presence on the floor, including his ability to hit from three, helps create openings on a team that is thin at small forward.

“Really gives us the spacing that we need with Kyle (Lowry) and DeMar handling the ball, attacking of the dribble,” Casey said. “That’s what we need from him, his spacing and his defensive presence. He did a great job accepting that role last year. He takes us from a good team to a pretty good team when he does that.”

For his part, Carroll said the mental side of the injury was tough, but something he forced himself to push through.

“You’ve got to stay strong, especially in this league. Nobody’s going to feel sorry for you,” he said. “It can be draining to keep on going through the same thing, having the same setbacks. But I’m happy right now because I haven’t had any setbacks. I’ve just got to look at the positives and keep trying to work towards the future.”

ESPN’s new NBA contract lowers value of Disney stock

ANAHEIM, CA - JUNE 22:  In this handout image provided by Disney, Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant (L) celebrates the Lakers' NBA championship with Goofy at Disneyland on June 22, 2010 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Paul Hiffmeyer/Disney via Getty Images)
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ESPN and Turner signed new national TV contracts worth $24 billion over nine years, a huge revenue increase triggering a corresponding salary-cap rise.

That wasn’t the only consequence of the deal.

Richard Morgan of the New York Post:

Drexel Hamilton analyst Tony Wible downgraded Disney stock on Monday in response to “a massive increase in NBA costs” for ESPN.

Disney’s deal to televise NBA games, with its increase in step-up costs over last year, could shave as much as 5 percent off pre-tax profits.

This isn’t necessarily bad for Disney-owned ESPN. It just shows how much more favorable the old national TV deals were for the TV networks.

The NBA is now getting a fair share of the money – which, if you’re the one paying the money, isn’t as good as paying a bargain rate.

Serge Ibaka says he wants to stay with Magic forever, and they want him long-term

Serge Ibaka jokes around while posing for a photo holding a plastic Flamingo during Orlando Magic's NBA basketball media day, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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The Magic took a major risk trading for Serge Ibaka, who’s heading into unrestricted free agency next summer. Rather than have Victor Oladipo (who’ll be a restricted free agent) and the No. 11 pick (who’s on a four-year contract), Orlando could come away empty-handed within a year if Ibaka leaves.

So far, everyone is saying the right things.

Ibaka, via Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel:

“I’m looking to stay here to play forever — for [as] many, many years as possible,” Serge Ibaka said during the Magic’s media day.

“I’m not really worried about my contract year or my long-term,” Ibaka said.

“One of the things I learned playing on a good team is when the team wins, when you make the playoffs, everybody looks good. So that’s what will be my focus right now, because if we win and make the playoffs, everything will take care of itself.”

Magic general manager Rob Hennigan, via Robbins:

“We certainly traded for Serge thinking long-term, and that’s our expectation,” Magic general manager Rob Hennigan said.

I’d be surprised if the Magic and Ibaka didn’t discuss the parameters of his next contract, with the Thunder’s permission, before making the trade. But the Collective Bargaining Agreement prevents any binding unofficial arrangements, so nothing is set in stone.

Ibaka is already talking about making the playoffs, and that would go a long way toward convincing him to stay in Orlando. But what if the Magic miss the postseason, a distinct possibility? How keen will Ibaka be on returning then?

He’ll have other suitors – unless he has a down year. Then, how badly will Orlando want him back?

That Ibaka and the Magic are entering the season with the stated intention of a long-term arrangement means something. But it means only so much.